What is a Supermoon?

 

This August brings a “perigee” full Moon.  This is the time each month when the Moon is nearest to Earth in its orbit. In other words, the full Moon coincides with perigee this August.

When this happens, there are some physical effects, such as elevated tides. All full Moons raise the Earth’s tides, however, a full Moon at perigee elevates tides further.

In recent years, the term “Supermoon” has become popular. It’s just a catchy way to say “perigee full Moon.” In fact, there will be three Supermoons before the end of the year—in   August, September and October.

At its fullest, the Moon is a perfect circular disk—though we won’t see that in August. Read our new post, “When the Full Moon Isn’t Round.”

Looking forward . . . September’s full Moon will bring the closest Supermoon of the year.    Further, it will align with a total eclipse of the Moon!

 

Full Moon Names

 

Some Native American tribes called the August Moon the “Sturgeon Moon” because they knew that the sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain were most readily caught during this full Moon. They also called August’s Moon the “Full Green Corn Moon.”

Different tribes had different Moon name preferences. Other examples for August are: Wheat Cut Moon (San Ildefonso, and San Juan), or “Moon When All Things Ripen” (Dakotah Sioux) or “Blueberry Moon” (Ojibway).

 

Moon Folklore

  • Clothes washed for the first time in the full Moon will not last long.
  • If you glimpse the new Moon over your right shoulder, you will have good luck.
  • To have a project prosper, start it during the new Moon.

Babies born a day after the full Moon enjoy success and endurance.

 

(exceprt.almanac.com)