“SOCCER – ALL TIME IMPOSSIBLE Soccer Goals Compilation – Part 1”

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Modern pentathlon at the 2016 Summer Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Modern pentathlon
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Modern Pentathlon, Rio 2016.png
Venue Deodoro Aquatics Centre
Deodoro Stadium
Youth Arena
Dates 18–20 August
Competitors 72
«2012 2020»
Modern pentathlon at the
2016 Summer Olympics

Modern pentathlon pictogram.svg
Events
men  women

The modern pentathlon at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro took place from 19 to 20 August 2016 at Deodoro Aquatics Centre, Deodoro Stadium and Youth Arena.

Thirty-six athletes competed each in the men’s and women’s events.[1]Initially the Union Internationale de Pentathlon Moderne (UIPM) proposed that all five events be staged in the same arena. While this did not eventuate, all venues were within approximately 300 metres of each other.

Format[edit]

Modern pentathlon contained five events; pistol shooting, épée fencing, 200 m freestyle swimming, show jumping, and a 3.2 km cross-country run.[4]

The first three events (fencing, swimming, and show jumping) were scored on a points system. Those points were then converted into a time handicap for the final combined event (pistol shooting and cross-country running), with the points leader starting first and each other competitor having a delayed start based on how many points behind the leader they were. This results in the finish order of the run being the final ranking for the event.

Unlike previous games, the fencing event consisted of two rounds: the traditional round-robin stage plus a “bonus round.” In the round-robin, each competitor faced every other competitor in a one-touch bout. The competitors were ranked according to how many victories they earn. The bonus round was held on one piste in a ladder, knock-out system. The two lowest-ranked competitors from the round-robin faced each other in another one-touch bout; the winner was credited with the additional victory and advanced to face the next-lowest ranked competitor. This continued, up the ranking ladder, until all competitors had competed in the bonus round.[5][6]

The swimming portion consisted of a 200 metre freestyle race, with score based on time.[6]

The show jumping competition involved riding an unfamiliar horse over a course with 12 obstacles. The score was based on penalties for fallen bars, refusals, falls, and being over the time limit.[6]

The combined running and pistol shooting events remain unchanged from the new combined format from 2012; athletes face four rounds of shooting each followed by an 800 m run. In each of the four rounds of firing, they must shoot five targets, loading the gun after every shot, and then being permitted to resume their running. Misses are not explicitly penalized, but practically result in the competitor taking longer to score five hits. After 70 seconds, even if the competitor has not scored five hits, they move on to the next leg of the run.[4][6]

Qualification[edit]

Thirty-six athletes had to qualify for each of the two events; a maximum of two per gender from any nation. Qualification methods were the same for both the men’s and women’s events.[7]

The host nation Brazil had been guaranteed a single place each in the men’s and women’s events, while two invitational places would be allocated by UIPM once the rest of the qualifiers were decided.[7]

Between January and August 2015, the initial distribution of quotas to the athletes had taken place based on the competition results. Five continental championships afforded twenty places each per gender: one each from Africa and Oceania, five from Asia, eight from Europe, and five from the Americas with a maximum of one quota per NOC (winners from NORCECA and South America, and top three from the 2015 Pan American Games in Toronto, Canada).[7] Qualified athletes will also be the winner of the 2015 UIPM World Cup final (held in Minsk, Belarus from June 12 to 14) and the top three finishers at the World Championships in Berlin, Germany, held between June 28 and July 6, 2015.[7]

The top three ranked athletes, having not qualified by any means, were awarded a place at the 2016 UIPM World Championships in Moscow, Russia, while the remaining seven were based on the pentathlon’s world rankings as of June 1, 2016.[7]

Participating[edit]

Participating nations[edit]

Medalists[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men’s
details
Aleksander Lesun
 Russia
Pavlo Tymoshchenko
 Ukraine
Ismael Hernández
 Mexico
Women’s
details
Chloe Esposito
 Australia
Élodie Clouvel
 France
Oktawia Nowacka
 Poland

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Australia 1 0 0 1
Russia 1 0 0 1
3 France 0 1 0 1
Ukraine 0 1 0 1
5 Mexico 0 0 1 1
Poland 0 0 1 1
Total 2 2 2 6

References

Table tennis at the 2016 Summer Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Table tennis
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Table Tennis, Rio 2016.png
Venue Riocentro – Pavilion 3
Dates 6–17 August 2016
Competitors 172 from 56 nations
«2012 2020»
Table tennis at the
2016 Summer Olympics

Table tennis pictogram.svg
List of table tennis players
Singles men women
Teams men women

Table tennis at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro took place from 6 to 17 August 2016 at the third pavilion of Riocentro. Around 172 table tennis players (an equal distribution between men and women) competed in both the singles and team events.[1][2] Table tennis had appeared at the Summer Olympics on seven previous occasions beginning with the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul. In addition to men’s and women’s singles, the team events were staged for the third time since replacing doubles events at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing.

Qualification[edit]

As the host nation, Brazil had automatically qualified six athletes; a team of three men and women with one each competing in the singles.[3]

The top 22 male and top 22 female players on the International Table Tennis Federation‘s Olympic ranking list as of January 1, 2016 were qualified for the singles event at the Games. No nation could have more than two players per gender in the singles at these Games, so some players below the twenty-eighth position were given a qualifying place based on ranking.[3]

Forty places were awarded to the table tennis players with a maximum of two per NOC and gender through the following continental qualification tournaments between July 1, 2015 and April 24, 2016: six each from Africa and Latin America, eleven each from Asia and Europe, and three each from North America and Oceania. One invitational place per gender was allocated by the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF).[3]

For the team events, the highest-ranked NOC from each continent that already contained two qualified players for the singles added a quota place to form a team of three players and thereby secured a direct qualifying place for the Games based on the ITTF Olympic Team Ranking list. The remaining ten teams were allotted to the nine highest-ranked NOCs in any continent and to the host nation Brazil (if not qualified by any means) that have two players qualified for the singles. If less than nine nations, the next best teams with a single player would have secured a place for the Olympics.[3][2]

Competition schedule[edit]

P Preliminary rounds ¼ Quarterfinals ½ Semifinals F Final
Event↓/Date → Sat 6 Sun 7 Mon 8 Tue 9 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17
Men’s singles P ¼ ½ F
Men’s team P ¼ ½ F
Women’s singles P ¼ ½ F
Women’s team P ¼ ½ F

Participating[edit]

Participating nations[edit]

Competitors[edit]

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 China 4 2 0 6
2 Japan 0 1 2 3
3 Germany 0 1 1 2
4 North Korea 0 0 1 1
Total 4 4 4 12

Events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men’s singles
details
Ma Long
 China
Zhang Jike
 China
Jun Mizutani
 Japan
Men’s team
details
 China (CHN)
Zhang Jike
Ma Long
Xu Xin
 Japan (JPN)
Koki Niwa
Jun Mizutani
Maharu Yoshimura
 Germany (GER)
Timo Boll
Dimitrij Ovtcharov
Bastian Steger
Women’s singles
details
Ding Ning
 China
Li Xiaoxia
 China
Kim Song-i
 North Korea
Women’s team
details
 China (CHN)
Liu Shiwen
Ding Ning
Li Xiaoxia
 Germany (GER)
Han Ying
Petrissa Solja
Shan Xiaona
 Japan (JPN)
Ai Fukuhara
Kasumi Ishikawa
Mima Ito

See also

Handball at the 2016 Summer Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Handball at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Handball, Rio 2016.png
Tournament details
Host country  Brazil
Dates 6–21 August 2016
Teams 24 (from 5 confederations)
Venue(s) (in 1 host city)
Next
Handball at the
2016 Summer Olympics

Handball pictogram.svg
Tournament
men  women
Rosters
men  women

The handball tournaments at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeirowas held from 6 to 21 August at the Future Arena in the Barra Olympic Park.

Competition schedule[edit]

G Group stage ¼ Quarter-finals ½ Semi-finals B Bronze medal match F Final
Event↓/Date → Sat 6 Sun 7 Mon 8 Tue 9 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20 Sun 21
Men G G G G G ¼ ½ B F
Women G G G G G ¼ ½ B F

Qualification[edit]

Each National Olympic Committee might enter up to one men’s and one women’s team in the handball tournaments. The qualification processes for the men’s and women’s events were similar. The host country was guaranteed an entry in each event, as was the 2015 World Champion (runner-up if the Olympic host was the champion). 4 more spots were awarded to the winners of continental qualification tournaments (for Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas, with the runner-up qualifying if the winner was the Olympic host or the World Champion). Finally, 6 spots were awarded through 3 Olympic Qualification Tournaments. These tournaments were open to the top 6 teams from the World Championship that had not already qualified as well as 6 entrants determined through a complex continental qualification algorithm; the 12 teams were divided into 3 tournaments of 4 teams each, with the top 2 teams in each tournament qualifying.[2]

Men’s qualification[edit]

Mean of qualification

Date Host Vacancies Qualified
Host nation 2 October 2009 Denmark Copenhagen 1  Brazil
2015 World Championship 15 January – 1 February 2015  Qatar 1  France
2015 Pan American Games 16–25 July 2015 Canada Toronto 1  Argentina
2015 Asian Qualification Tournament 14–27 November 2015 Qatar Doha 1  Qatar
2016 European Championship 15–31 January 2016  Poland 1  Germany
2016 African Championship 21–30 January 2016 Egypt Cairo 1  Egypt
2016 Olympic Qualification Tournaments 8–10 April 2016 Poland Gdańsk 2  Poland
 Tunisia
Sweden Malmö 2  Slovenia
 Sweden
Denmark Herning 2  Denmark
 Croatia
Total 12

Women’s qualification[edit]

Mean of qualification

Date Host Vacancies Qualified
Host nation 2 October 2009 Denmark Copenhagen 1  Brazil
2014 European Championship 7–21 December 2014 Various 1  Spain[1]
2015 African Qualification Tournament 19–21 March 2015 Angola Luanda 1  Angola
2015 Pan American Games 15–24 July 2015 Canada Toronto 1  Argentina
2015 Asian Qualification Tournament 20–25 October 2015 Japan Nagoya 1  South Korea
2015 World Championship 5–20 December 2015  Denmark 1  Norway
2016 Olympic Qualification Tournaments 18–20 March 2016 France Metz 2  Netherlands
 France
Denmark Aarhus 2  Romania
 Montenegro
Russia Astrakhan 2  Russia
 Sweden
Total 12

^ 1. Norway won the European Championship, ensuring its qualification. Norway later also won the 2015 World Championship title, which took precedence in the qualification path. Therefore, the European Championship’s runner-up, Spain, received the European continental tournament berth.

Draw[edit]

The draw took place on 29 April 2016.[3]

Men’s competition[edit]

The competition consisted of two stages; a group stage followed by a knockout stage.

Group stage[edit]

The teams were divided into two groups of six nations, playing every team in their group once. Two points were awarded for a victory, one for a draw. The top four teams per group qualified for the quarter-finals.

Group A[edit]

Pos Team

Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Croatia 5 4 0 1 147 134 +13 8[a] Quarter-finals
2  France 5 4 0 1 152 126 +26 8[a]
3  Denmark 5 3 0 2 136 127 +9 6
4  Qatar 5 2 1 2 122 127 −5 5
5  Argentina 5 1 0 4 110 126 −16 2
6  Tunisia 5 0 1 4 118 145 −27 1
Source: IHF
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head points; 3) Head-to-head goal difference; 4) Head-to-head goals scored; 5) Goal difference; 6) Goals scored; 7) Draw.
Notes:
  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Croatia 29–28 France

Group B[edit]

Pos Team

Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Germany 5 4 0 1 153 141 +12 8[a] Quarter-finals
2  Slovenia 5 4 0 1 137 126 +11 8[a]
3  Brazil (H) 5 2 1 2 141 150 −9 5
4  Poland 5 2 0 3 139 140 −1 4
5  Egypt 5 1 1 3 129 143 −14 3
6  Sweden 5 1 0 4 132 131 +1 2
Source: IHF
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head points; 3) Head-to-head goal difference; 4) Head-to-head goals scored; 5) Goal difference; 6) Goals scored; 7) Draw.
(H) Host.
Notes:
  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Slovenia 25–28 Germany

Knockout stage[edit]

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Gold medal
17 August
 Croatia 27
19 August
 Poland 30
 Poland 28
17 August
 Denmark (OT) 29
 Denmark 37
21 August
 Slovenia 30
 Denmark 28
17 August
 France 26
 Brazil 27
19 August
 France 34
 France 29
17 August
 Germany 28 Bronze medal
 Germany 34
21 August
 Qatar 22
 Poland 25
 Germany 31

Women’s competition[edit]

The competition consisted of two stages; a group stage followed by a knockout stage.

Group stage[edit]

The teams were divided into two groups of six nations, playing every team in their group once. Two points were awarded for a victory, one for a draw. The top four teams per group qualified for the quarter-finals.

Group A[edit]

Pos Team

Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Brazil (H) 5 4 0 1 138 117 +21 8 Quarter-finals
2  Norway 5 4 0 1 141 121 +20 8
3  Spain 5 3 0 2 125 116 +9 6
4  Angola 5 2 0 3 116 128 −12 4
5  Romania 5 2 0 3 108 119 −11 4
6  Montenegro 5 0 0 5 107 134 −27 0
Source: IHF
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head points; 3) Head-to-head goal difference; 4) Head-to-head goals scored; 5) Goal difference; 6) Goals scored; 7) Draw.
(H) Host.

Group B[edit]

Pos Team

Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Russia 5 5 0 0 165 147 +18 10 Quarter-finals
2  France 5 4 0 1 118 93 +25 8
3  Sweden 5 2 1 2 150 141 +9 5
4  Netherlands 5 1 2 2 135 135 0 4
5  South Korea 5 1 1 3 130 136 −6 3
6  Argentina 5 0 0 5 101 147 −46 0
Source: IHF
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head points; 3) Head-to-head goal difference; 4) Head-to-head goals scored; 5) Goal difference; 6) Goals scored; 7) Draw.

Knockout stage[edit]

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Gold medal
16 August
 Brazil 23
18 August
 Netherlands 32
 Netherlands 23
16 August
 France 24
 Spain 26
20 August
 France (OT) 27
 France 19
16 August
 Russia 22
 Sweden 20
18 August
 Norway 33
 Norway 37
16 August
 Russia (OT) 38 Bronze medal
 Russia 31
20 August
 Angola 27
 Netherlands 26
 Norway 36

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Denmark 1 0 0 1
Russia 1 0 0 1
3 France 0 2 0 2
4 Germany 0 0 1 1
Norway 0 0 1 1
Total 2 2 2 6

Medalists[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men
details
 Denmark (DEN)
Niklas Landin Jacobsen
Mads Christiansen
Mads Mensah Larsen
Casper Ulrich Mortensen
Jesper Noddesbo
Jannick Green
Lasse Svan Hansen
Rene Toft Hansen
Henrik Mollgaard
Kasper Sondergaard
Henrik Toft Hansen
Mikkel Hansen
Morten Olsen
Michael Damgaard
 France (FRA)
Olivier Nyokas
Daniel Narcisse
Vincent Gérard
Nikola Karabatic
Kentin Mahé
Mathieu Grébille
Thierry Omeyer
Timothey N’Guessan
Luc Abalo
Cedric Sorhaindo
Michael Guigou
Luka Karabatic
Ludovic Fabregas
Adrien Dipanda
Valentin Porte
 Germany (GER)
Uwe Gensheimer
Finn Lemke
Patrick Wiencek
Tobias Reichmann
Fabian Wiede
Silvio Heinevetter
Hendrik Pekeler
Steffen Weinhold
Martin Strobel
Patrick Groetzki
Kai Häfner
Andreas Wolff
Julius Kühn
Christian Dissinger
Paul Drux
Women
details
 Russia (RUS)
Anna Sedoykina
Polina Kuznetsova
Daria Dmitrieva
Anna Sen
Olga Akopyan
Anna Vyakhireva
Marina Sudakova
Vladlena Bobrovnikova
Victoria Zhilinskayte
Yekaterina Marennikova
Irina Bliznova
Ekaterina Ilina
Maya Petrova
Tatyana Yerokhina
Victoriya Kalinina
 France (FRA)
Laura Glauser
Blandine Dancette
Camille Ayglon
Allison Pineau
Laurisa Landre
Grace Zaadi
Marie Prouvensier
Amandine Leynaud
Manon Houette
Siraba Dembélé
Chloé Bulleux
Béatrice Edwige
Estelle Nze Minko
Gnonsiane Niombla
Alexandra Lacrabère
 Norway (NOR)
Kari Aalvik Grimsbø
Mari Molid
Emilie Hegh Arntzen
Ida Alstad
Veronica Kristiansen
Heidi Løke
Nora Mørk
Stine Bredal Oftedal
Marit Malm Frafjord
Katrine Lunde
Linn-Kristin Riegelhuth Koren
Amanda Kurtović
Camilla Herrem
Sanna Solberg

References