United Nations General Assembly resolution ES-10/L.22

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
UN General Assembly
Resolution ES‑10/L.22
United Nations General Assembly resolution A ES 10 L 22 vote.png

  Voted in favor
  Voted against
  Abstained
  Not present
Date 21 December 2017
Meeting no. 10th Emergency Special Session (continuation)
Code A/RES/ES‑10/L.22 (Document)
Subject Status of Jerusalem
Voting summary
128 voted for
9 voted against
35 abstained
21 absent
Result Recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital as “null and void”

United Nations General Assembly resolution ES‑10/L.22 is a emergency session resolution declaring the status of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital as “null and void.”.[1] It was adopted by the 37th Plenary meeting of the tenth emergency special session of the United Nations General Assembly[2] during the tenure of the seventy-second session of the United Nations General Assembly on 21 December 2017. The draft resolution was drafted by Yemen and Turkey.[3]Though strongly contested by the United States, it passed by 128 votes to nine against with 21 absentees and 35 abstentions.

Background[edit]

On 6 December 2017, US President Donald Trump said that he would recognise the status of Jerusalem as being Israel’s sovereign capital[4] in a departure from previous UNGA resolutions as well prevailing international norms where no state either recognises Jerusalem as a national capital nor has an embassy there. The move prompted protests from states and communities in many parts of the world.[5]

Following the failure of an United Nations Security Council resolution three days earlier, after an U.S. veto, to rescind the recognition by any states of Jerusalem as a national capital, Palestinian UN Ambassador Riyad Mansour said that the General Assembly would vote on a draft resolution calling for Trump’s declaration to be withdrawn. He sought to invoke Resolution 377, known as the “Uniting for Peace” resolution, to circumvent a veto. The resolution states that the General Assembly can call an Emergency Special Session to consider a matter “with a view to making appropriate recommendations to members for collective measures” if the Security Council fails to act.[6]

Campaign[edit]

On 20 December, US President Donald Trump threatened to cut US aid to countries voting against the US’ side.[7] The day before the vote, he said: “Let them vote against us…We don’t care…this isn’t like it used to be where they could vote against you and then you pay them hundreds of millions of dollars. We’re not going to be taken advantage of any longer.”[8]Ambassador Nikki Haley warned her country would remember and “take names” of every country that voted in favour of the resolution.[9][10][11][12] The governments of Turkey and Iran denounced USA’s threats as “anti-democratic” and “blackmail“.[13][14] She had sent to a letter to dozens of member states that warned Trump had asked her to “report back on those countries who voted against us.”[15] Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan warned Trump that “he cannot buy Turkey’s democratic will with petty dollars” and “that opposition of other countries will teach the United States a good lesson”.[16][17]

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stated that Israel rejects this vote before it passes and called the UN “house of lies”.[18]

Canada’s, which was seeking re-negotiations of the NAFTA, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland‘s spokesman confirmed its intention to abstain from the vote and that the resolution should not have come to the General Assembly.[19]

Content[edit]

The text of the resolution includes the following key statements:[20]

The General Assembly,

  • Bearing in mind the specific status of the Holy City of Jerusalem and, in particular, the need for the protection and preservation of the unique spiritual, religious and cultural dimensions of the City, as foreseen in the relevant United Nations resolutions,
  • Stressing that Jerusalem is a final status issue to be resolved through negotiations in line with relevant United Nations resolutions,
  • Expressing in this regard its deep regret at recent decisions concerning the status of Jerusalem,
  • Affirms that any decisions and actions which purport to have altered, the character, status or demographic composition of the Holy City of Jerusalem have no legal effect, are null and void and must be rescinded in compliance with relevant resolutions of the Security Council, and in this regard, calls upon all States to refrain from the establishment of diplomatic missions in the Holy City of Jerusalem, pursuant to resolution 478 (1980) of the Security Council;
  • Demands that all States comply with Security Council resolutions regarding the Holy City of Jerusalem, and not to recognize any actions or measures contrary to those resolutions;
  • Reiterates its call for the reversal of the negative trends on the ground that are imperiling the two-State solution and for the intensification and acceleration of international and regional efforts and support aimed at achieving, without delay, a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East on the basis of the relevant United Nations resolutions, the Madrid terms of reference, including the principle of land for peace, the Arab Peace Initiative and the Quartet Roadmap and an end to the Israeli occupation that began in 1967.

It concluded in reading that “any decisions and actions, which purport to have altered the character, status or demographic composition of the Holy City of Jerusalem have no legal effect, are null and void and must be rescinded in compliance with relevant resolutions of the Security Council.”[21]

Motion[edit]

The motion was proposed by Yemen and Turkey.[22]

Debate[edit]

In introducing the resolution as Chair of the Arab Group, Yemen’s Amabassador said the US decision was a “blatant violation of the rights of the Palestinian people, as well as those of all Christians and Muslims.” He emphasized that it constituted a “dangerous breach of the Charter of the United Nations and a serious threat to international peace and security, while also undermining the chances for a two‑State solution and fuelling the fires of violence and extremism.”[23]

Turkey, who was the co-sponsor of the draft resolution, also spoke as current Chair of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation(OIC).[23] Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said that Trump’s decision was an outrageous assault to all universal values. “The Palestinians have the right to their own state based on 1967 borders with East Jerusalem as its capital. This is the main parameter and only hope for a just and lasting peace in the region. However, the recent decision of a UN Member State to recognise Jerusalem, or Al-Quds, as the capital of Israel, violates international law, including all relevant UN resolutions.”[22]

The General Assembly heard from Palestinian Foreign Minister Riad Al‑Malki, who said that the meeting was “not because of any animosity to the United States of America” but instead the sessions was “called to make the voice of the vast majority of the international community — and that of people around the world — heard on the question of Jerusalem/Al‑Quds Al‑Sharif.” He called the US decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and to move its embassy there “an aggressive and dangerous move” which could inflame tensions and lead to a religious war that “has no boundaries.” He added that though the decision would have no impact on the city’s status, it would nevertheless compromise the role of the United States in the Middle East peace process.[23] He urged member states to reject “blackmail and intimidation.”[5]

US Ambassador Nikki Haley then said that her country was “singled out for attack” because of its recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. She added that: “The United States will remember this day in which it was singled out for attack in the General Assembly for the very act of exercising our right as a sovereign nation,” Haley said. We will remember it when we are called upon to once again make the world’s largest contribution to the United Nations, and so many countries come calling on us, as they so often do, to pay even more and to use our influence for their benefit.”[15] She added that: “America will put our embassy in Jerusalem. That is what the American people want us to do, and it is the right thing to do. No vote in the United Nations will make any difference on that…this vote will make a difference in how Americans view the UN.”[22]

Israel’s Ambassador Danny Danon then told the assembly that the vowed that “no General Assembly resolution will ever drive us from Jerusalem.”[4]

Venezuela’s Ambassador, speaking for the Non‑Aligned Movement (NAM), expressed “grave concern about Israel’s ongoing violations in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including attempts to alter the character, status and demographic composition of the City of Jerusalem. [It was] slso concerned about the decision to relocate the United States embassy [and] warned that such provocative actions would further heighten tensions, with potentially far‑reaching repercussions given the extremely volatile backdrop.[23]

Other speakers included, Pakistan, Indonesia, Maldives, Syria, Bangladesh, Cuba, Iran and China.[23]

Malaysia’s Ambassador Datuk Seri Mohammed Shahrul Ikram Yaakob said that, as a member of the OIC and NAM, “Malaysia joins the international community in expressing our deep concern and rejects the decision by the United States to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. It is also an infringement of the Palestinian people’s rights and their right to self determination.” He called for a peaceful two-state solution and that Malaysia is concerned the situation will only feed into the agenda of extremists.”[2]

Other speakers included, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and South Africa. The Permanent Observer for the Holy See, Tomasz Grysa, emphasised that Jerusalem was most sacred to the Abrahamic faiths and a symbol for millions of believers around the world who considered it their “spiritual capital.” Its significance went “beyond the question of borders, a reality that should be considered a priority in every negotiation for a political solution.” The Holy See, he said, called for a “peaceful resolution that would ensure respect for the sacred nature of Jerusalem and its universal value…reiterating that only international guarantee could preserve its unique character and status and provide assurance of dialogue and reconciliation for peace in the region.”[23]

After the motion was passed, more speeches continued with Estonia, who also spoke on behalf of other states. Australia’s Ambassador then explained her country’s government did “not support unilateral action that undermined the peace process [and] it did not believe today’s text would help to bring the parties back to the negotiating table.”[23]

Other speakers included, Paraguay, whose Ambassador said that the country would abstain because “the question of Jerusalem was a matter for the Security Council, as the primary body responsible for the maintenance of international peace and security.”[23] This was followed by El Salvador, Argentina and Romania.[23]

Canada’s Ambassador Marc-Andre Blanchard called the proposal “one-sided”[23] and said: “We are disappointed that this resolution is one sided and does not advance prospects for peace to which we aspire, which is why we have abstained on today’s vote.” He, however, added that Canada wanted to emphasise Jerusalem’s special significance to the Abrahamic religions of Jews, Muslims and Christians. “Denying the connection between Jerusalem and the Jewish, Muslim and Christian faiths undermines the integrity of the site for all. We also reiterate the need to maintain the status quo at Jerusalem’s Holy sites.[19]

Nicaragua’s explained its support of the resolution, as it “rebuffed recent unilateral attempts to modify the character and status of Jerusalem. Such unilateral actions were in blatant violation of resolution 2234 (2016) and others…unilateral actions jeopardised peace and stability in the Middle East and drew the international community further away from a solution.”[23]

Mexico’s Ambassador then explained the abstention and emphasised that convening an emergency session was a disproportionate response. “The United States must become part of the solution, not a stumbling block that would hamper progress…the international community was further than ever from agreement.”[23]

The Czech Republic then said that while it supported the European Union position, it had abstained because it “did not believe the draft resolution would contribute to the peace process.”[23]

Armenia said that is position “remained unchanged. The situation should be resolved through negotiations paving the way for lasting peace and security.”[23]

Hungary echoed Armenia’s stance and said it would not comment on the foreign relations of the United States.[23]

Latvia then spoke, before Estonia re-took the floor to say it had also spoken on behalf of Albania, Lithuania and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.[23]

Result[edit]

Vote[24] Quantity States
Approve 128 Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cape Verde, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Republic of the Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Ivory Coast, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Monaco, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.
Reject 9 Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, Togo, United States.
Abstain 35 Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cameroon, Canada, Colombia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Haiti, Hungary, Jamaica, Kiribati, Latvia, Lesotho, Malawi, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Rwanda, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu.
Absent 21 Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, East Timor, El Salvador, Georgia, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Mongolia, Myanmar, Moldova, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, São Tomé and Príncipe, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Zambia.

Reactions[edit]

States

Israel – Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu rejected the result shortly after it was announced in call it “preposterous,” while he also thanked the states that supported “the truth” by not participating in “the theatre of the absurd.” He added that: “Jerusalem is our capital. Always was, always will be…But I do appreciate the fact that a growing number of countries refused to participate in this theatre of the absurd. So I appreciate that, and especially I want to again express our thanks to [US] President (Donald) Trump and Ambassador [Nikki] Haley, for their stalwart defence of Israel and their stalwart defence of the truth.” Defence Minister Avigdor Liberman, reminded Israelis of the longstanding Israeli disdain for such votes. “Let us just remember that this is the same UN about which our first ambassador to the organisation, Abba Eban, once said: ‘If Algeria introduced a resolution declaring that the earth was flat and that Israel had flattened it, it would pass by a vote of 164 to 13 with 26 abstentions’. There is nothing new in what just happened at the UN.” He also praised the US as “the moral beacon shining out of the darkness.” Minister of Strategic Affairs and Public Security Gilad Erdan said: “The historic connection between Israel and Jerusalem is stronger than any vote by the ‘United Nations’ — nations who are united only by their fear and their refusal to recognise the simple truth that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel and the Jewish people.”

    • However, opposition Joint List Chairman and MK Ayman Odeh called the vote a wake-up call for Israel: “In the international arena, there still exists a large and definitive majority that believes that the Palestinian people, like all other nations, deserve a place in this world and the right to self-determination. This evening’s vote by the majority of the world’s nations against Trump’s announcement, in spite of the pressure and threats, flies in the face of Trump’s and Netanyahu’s diplomatic policy and is a clear statement by the international community in support of peace and the right of the Palestinians to an independent state, whose capital is East Jerusalem,”[8]
Media

Haaretz‘s Noa Landau, wrote, in citing unnamed diplomatic sourced, that Israel was particularly disappointed with countries like India that have enhanced bilateral relations with it recently. “The main disappointment in Israel was with the countries that have enhanced bilateral relations in recent years, especially those that share a particularly conservative worldview with the Netanyahu government. For example, India – whose Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, visited Israel in July, a tour that was memorable mainly for the pastoral photographs of him and Netanyahu embracing and wading in the waves – voted for the resolution against Israel and the United States.”[8]

Others

At a “Solidarity to Save Jerusalem” rally organised by the Barisan National government in Malaysia, one of the attendees Association of NextGen Christians of Malaysia President Joshua Hong said at the Putra Mosque: “We are here because we feel that the decision made by President Trump on announcing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel is merely a political decision. He added that the decision also hurts Christian and Arabic churches in Palestine and not just the Muslims. “To us as Christians, Jerusalem is a city of peace and after that announcement, we feel there is no more peace.I think it is not right and unjust. We believe we should continue pursuing the sustainable peace solution for Palestine and Israel, rather than just a single nation declaring it just like that.” He claimed that about 50 members of the group turned up in a show of support for the Palestinian people..[2]

Badminton at the 2016 Summer Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Badminton
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Badminton, Rio 2016.png
Venue Riocentro – Pavilion 4
Dates 11–20 August
Competitors 172
«2012 2020»

The badminton tournaments at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro took place from 11 to 20 August at the fourth pavilion ofRiocentro. A total of 172 athletes competed in five events: men’s singles,men’s doubles, women’s singles, women’s doubles, and mixed doubles.[1]

Similar to 2012 format, a combination of group play and knockout stages had been maintained at these Games. In all the doubles tournaments, theBadminton World Federation instituted several changes to the competition rules after the match fixing scandal from the previous Olympics, as all pairs finishing second in their groups would be placed into another draw to determine who they face in the next round, while the top pair in each group must have a fixed position matched to its designated seed in the knockout phase.[2]

The Games made use of about 8,400 shuttlecocks.[3]

Qualification[edit]

The Olympic qualification period took place between May 4, 2015 and May 1, 2016, and the Badminton World Federationrankings list, scheduled to publish on May 5, 2016, was used to allocate spots.[4] Unlike the previous Games, nations could only enter a maximum of two players each in the men’s and women’s singles, if both were ranked in the world’s top 16; otherwise, one quota place until the roster of thirty-eight players had been completed. Similar regulations in the singles tournaments also applied to the players competing in the doubles, as the NOCs could only enter a maximum of two pairs if both were ranked in the top eight, while the remaining NOCs were entitled to one until the quota of 16 highest-ranked pairs was filled.[5]

For each player who had qualified in more than one discipline, an additional quota place in each of the singles tournaments would have became free. If no player from one continent had qualify, the best ranked player from a respective continent would have got a quota place.[4]

Schedule[edit]

P Preliminaries R Round of 16 ¼ Quarterfinals ½ Semifinals F Final
Date → Thu 11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tues 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20
Event ↓ M A E M A E M A E M A E M E M E M E M E M E M E
Men’s singles P R ¼ ½ F
Men’s doubles P ¼ ½ F F
Women’s singles P R ¼ ½ F
Women’s doubles P ¼ ½ F
Mixed doubles P ¼ ½ F

M = Morning session, A = Afternoon session, E = Evening session

Participation[edit]

Participating nations[edit]

List of badminton players at the 2016 Summer Olympics

NOC Name Age Event and World Ranking (21 July 2016)
MS WS MD WD XD
 Australia Matthew Chau 9 November 1994 (age 23) 36
 Australia Robin Middleton 8 February 1985 (age 33) 28
 Australia Sawan Serasinghe 21 February 1994 (age 23) 36
 Australia Chen Hsuan-yu 1 June 1993 (age 24) 72
 Australia Leanne Choo 5 June 1991 (age 26) 28
 Austria David Obernosterer 30 May 1989 (age 28) 69
 Austria Elisabeth Baldauf 3 August 1990 (age 27) 75
 Belgium Yuhan Tan 21 April 1987 (age 30) 51
 Belgium Lianne Tan 20 November 1990 (age 27) 62
 Brazil Ygor Coelho de Oliveira 24 November 1996 (age 21) 64
 Brazil Lohaynny Vicente 2 May 1996 (age 21) 66
 Brunei Jaspar Yu Woon 14 November 1988 (age 29) 413
 Bulgaria Gabriela Stoeva 15 July 1994 (age 23) 16
 Bulgaria Stefani Stoeva 23 September 1995 (age 22) 16
 Bulgaria Linda Zechiri 27 July 1987 (age 30) 31
 Canada Martin Giuffre 5 October 1990 (age 27) 76
 Canada Michelle Li 3 November 1991 (age 26) 19
 China Chai Biao 10 October 1990 (age 27) 5
 China Chen Long 18 January 1989 (age 29) 2
 China Fu Haifeng 2 January 1984 (age 34) 4
 China Hong Wei 4 October 1989 (age 28) 5
 China Lin Dan 14 October 1983 (age 34) 3
 China Xu Chen 29 November 1984 (age 33) 6
 China Zhang Nan 1 March 1990 (age 27) 4 1
 China Li Xuerui 24 January 1991 (age 27) 3
 China Luo Ying 11 January 1991 (age 27) 7
 China Luo Yu 11 January 1991 (age 27) 7
 China Ma Jin 7 May 1988 (age 29) 6
 China Tang Yuanting 2 August 1994 (age 23) 2
 China Wang Yihan 18 January 1988 (age 30) 2
 China Yu Yang 7 April 1986 (age 31) 2
 China Zhao Yunlei 25 August 1986 (age 31) 1
 Chinese Taipei Chou Tien-chen 8 January 1990 (age 28) 7
 Chinese Taipei Lee Sheng-mu 3 October 1986 (age 31) 20
 Chinese Taipei Tsai Chia-hsin 25 July 1982 (age 35) 20
 Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 20 June 1994 (age 23) 8
 Cuba Osleni Guerrero 18 October 1989 (age 28) 60
 Czech Republic Petr Koukal 14 December 1985 (age 32) 83
 Czech Republic Kristína Gavnholt 12 September 1988 (age 29) 36
 Denmark Viktor Axelsen 4 June 1994 (age 23) 4
 Denmark Mathias Boe 11 July 1980 (age 37) 6
 Denmark Joachim Fischer Nielsen 23 November 1978 (age 39) 4
 Denmark Jan Østergaard Jørgensen 31 December 1987 (age 30) 5
 Denmark Carsten Mogensen 24 July 1983 (age 34) 6
 Denmark Line Kjærsfeldt 20 April 1994 (age 23) 24
 Denmark Christinna Pedersen 12 May 1986 (age 31) 6 4
 Denmark Kamilla Rytter Juhl 23 November 1983 (age 34) 6
 Estonia Raul Must 9 November 1987 (age 30) 40
 Estonia Kati Tolmoff 3 December 1983 (age 34) 71
 Finland Nanna Vainio 29 May 1991 (age 26) 63
 France Brice Leverdez 9 April 1986 (age 31) 39
 France Delphine Lansac 18 July 1995 (age 22) 51
 Great Britain Chris Adcock 27 April 1989 (age 28) 7
 Great Britain Marcus Ellis 14 September 1989 (age 28) 22
 Great Britain Chris Langridge 2 May 1985 (age 32) 22
 Great Britain Rajiv Ouseph 30 August 1986 (age 31) 15
 Great Britain Gabrielle Adcock 30 September 1990 (age 27) 7
 Great Britain Kirsty Gilmour 21 September 1993 (age 24) 15
 Great Britain Heather Olver 15 March 1986 (age 31) 25
 Great Britain Lauren Smith 26 September 1991 (age 26) 25
 Germany Michael Fuchs 22 April 1982 (age 35) 27 18
 Germany Johannes Schöttler 27 August 1984 (age 33) 27
 Germany Marc Zwiebler 13 March 1984 (age 33) 14
 Germany Johanna Goliszewski 9 May 1986 (age 31) 24
 Germany Birgit Michels 28 September 1984 (age 33) 18
 Germany Carla Nelte 21 September 1990 (age 27) 24
 Germany Karin Schnaase 14 February 1985 (age 33) 28
 Guatemala Kevin Cordón 28 November 1986 (age 31) 44
 Hong Kong Hu Yun 31 August 1981 (age 36) 12
 Hong Kong Lee Chun Hei 25 January 1994 (age 24) 16
 Hong Kong Ng Ka Long
24 June 1994 (age 23) 13
 Hong Kong Chau Hoi Wah 5 June 1986 (age 31) 16
 Hong Kong Poon Lok Yan 22 August 1991 (age 26) 31
 Hong Kong Tse Ying Suet 9 November 1991 (age 26) 31
 Hong Kong Yip Pui Yin 6 August 1987 (age 30) 34
 Hungary Laura Sárosi 11 November 1992 (age 25) 68
 India Manu Attri 31 December 1992 (age 25) 21
 India Srikanth Kidambi 7 February 1993 (age 25) 11
 India B. Sumeeth Reddy 26 September 1991 (age 26) 21
 India Jwala Gutta 7 September 1983 (age 34) 21
 India Saina Nehwal 17 March 1990 (age 27) 5
 India Ponnappa, AshwiniAshwini Ponnappa 18 September 1989 (age 28) 21
 India Sindhu, PusarlaPusarla Sindhu 5 July 1995 (age 22) 10
 Indonesia Ahmad, TontowiTontowi Ahmad 18 July 1987 (age 30) 3
 Indonesia Ahsan, MohammadMohammad Ahsan 7 September 1987 (age 30) 2
 Indonesia Jordan, PraveenPraveen Jordan 26 April 1993 (age 24) 5
 Indonesia Setiawan, HendraHendra Setiawan 25 August 1984 (age 33) 2
 Indonesia Sugiarto, TommyTommy Sugiarto 31 May 1988 (age 29) 8
 Indonesia Fanetri, LindaweniLindaweni Fanetri 18 January 1990 (age 28) 25
 Indonesia Maheswari, Nitya KrishindaNitya Krishinda Maheswari 16 December 1988 (age 29) 4
 Indonesia Natsir, LilyanaLilyana Natsir 9 September 1985 (age 32) 3
 Indonesia Polii, GreysiaGreysia Polii 11 August 1987 (age 30) 4
 Indonesia Susanto, DebbyDebby Susanto 3 May 1989 (age 28) 5
 Ireland Evans, ScottScott Evans 26 September 1987 (age 30) 74
 Ireland Magee, ChloeChloe Magee 29 November 1988 (age 29) 58
 Israel Zilberman, MishaMisha Zilberman 30 January 1989 (age 29) 52
 Italy Cicognini, JeanineJeanine Cicognini 14 November 1986 (age 31) 61
 Japan Endo, HiroyukiHiroyuki Endo 16 December 1986 (age 31) 8
 Japan Hayakawa, KenichiKenichi Hayakawa 5 April 1986 (age 31) 8
 Japan Kazuno, KentaKenta Kazuno 25 November 1985 (age 32) 15
 Japan Sasaki, ShoSho Sasaki 30 June 1982 (age 35) 25
 Japan Kurihara, AyaneAyane Kurihara 27 September 1989 (age 28) 15
 Japan Matsutomo, MisakiMisaki Matsutomo 8 February 1992 (age 26) 1
 Japan Okuhara, NozomiNozomi Okuhara 13 March 1995 (age 22) 6
 Japan Takahashi, AyakaAyaka Takahashi 19 April 1990 (age 27) 1
 Japan Yamaguchi, AkaneAkane Yamaguchi 6 June 1997 (age 20) 12
 Malaysia Peng Soon, ChanChan Peng Soon 27 April 1988 (age 29) 10
 Malaysia V Shem, GohGoh V Shem 20 May 1989 (age 28) 12
 Malaysia Chong Wei, LeeLee Chong Wei 21 October 1982 (age 35) 1
 Malaysia Wee Kiong, TanTan Wee Kiong 21 May 1989 (age 28) 12
 Malaysia Liu Ying, GohGoh Liu Ying 30 May 1989 (age 28) 10
 Malaysia Hoo Kah Mun, VivianVivian Hoo Kah Mun 19 March 1990 (age 27) 15
 Malaysia Jing Yi, TeeTee Jing Yi 8 February 1991 (age 27) 29
 Malaysia Khe Wei, WoonWoon Khe Wei 18 March 1989 (age 28) 15
 Mexico Muñoz, LinoLino Muñoz 8 February 1991 (age 27) 73
 Mauritius Foo Kune, KateKate Foo Kune 29 March 1993 (age 24) 69
 Netherlands Arends, JaccoJacco Arends 28 January 1991 (age 27) 17
 Netherlands Muskens, EefjeEefje Muskens 17 June 1989 (age 28) 11
 Netherlands Piek, SelenaSelena Piek 30 September 1991 (age 26) 11 17
 Poland Cwalina, AdamAdam Cwalina 26 January 1985 (age 33) 25
 Poland Dziółko, AdrianAdrian Dziółko 22 February 1990 (age 27) 53
 Poland Mateusiak, RobertRobert Mateusiak 13 January 1976 (age 42) 13
 Poland Wacha, PrzemysławPrzemysław Wacha 31 January 1981 (age 37) 25
 Poland Zięba, NadieżdaNadieżda Zięba 21 May 1984 (age 33) 13
 Portugal Martins, PedroPedro Martins 14 February 1990 (age 28) 63
 Portugal Santos, TelmaTelma Santos 1 August 1983 (age 34) 67
 South Africa Maliekal, JacobJacob Maliekal 1 January 1991 (age 27) 78
 Russia Ivanov, VladimirVladimir Ivanov 3 July 1987 (age 30) 13
 Russia Malkov, VladimirVladimir Malkov 9 April 1986 (age 31) 61
 Russia Sozonov, IvanIvan Sozonov 6 July 1989 (age 28) 13
 Russia Perminova, NataliaNatalia Perminova 14 November 1991 (age 26) 55
 Singapore Wong Zi Liang, DerekDerek Wong Zi Liang 13 January 1989 (age 29) 57
 Singapore Xiaoyu, LiangLiang Xiaoyu 11 January 1996 (age 22) 30
 South Korea Gi-jung, KimKim Gi-jung 14 August 1990 (age 27) 3
 South Korea Sa-rang, KimKim Sa-rang 22 August 1989 (age 28) 3
 South Korea Sung-hyun, KoKo Sung-hyun 21 May 1987 (age 30) 2
 South Korea Dong-keun, LeeLee Dong-keun 20 November 1990 (age 27) 16
 South Korea Yong-dae, LeeLee Yong-dae 11 September 1988 (age 29) 1
 South Korea Wan-ho, SonSon Wan-ho 17 May 1988 (age 29) 9
 South Korea Yeon-seong, YooYoo Yeon-seong 19 August 1986 (age 31) 1
 South Korea Yeon-ju, BaeBae Yeon-ju 26 October 1990 (age 27) 17
 South Korea Ye-na, ChangChang Ye-na 13 December 1989 (age 28) 9
 South Korea Kyung-eun, JungJung Kyung-eun 20 March 1990 (age 27) 5
 South Korea Ha-na, KimKim Ha-na 27 December 1989 (age 28) 2
 South Korea So-hee, LeeLee So-hee 14 June 1994 (age 23) 9
 South Korea Seung-chan, ShinShin Seung-chan 6 December 1994 (age 23) 5
 South Korea Ji-hyun, SungSung Ji-hyun 29 July 1991 (age 26) 7
 Spain Abian, PabloPablo Abian 12 June 1985 (age 32) 43
 Spain Marin, CarolinaCarolina Marin 15 June 1993 (age 24) 1
 Sri Lanka Karunaratne, NilukaNiluka Karunaratne 13 February 1985 (age 33) 95
 Switzerland Jaquet, SabrinaSabrina Jaquet 21 June 1987 (age 30) 82
 Suriname Opti, SorenSoren Opti 16 May 1997 (age 20) 326
 Sweden Hurskainen, HenriHenri Hurskainen 13 September 1986 (age 31) 50
 Thailand Issara, BodinBodin Issara 12 December 1990 (age 27) 14
 Thailand Ponsana, BoonsakBoonsak Ponsana 22 February 1982 (age 35) 32
 Thailand Amitrapai, SavitreeSavitree Amitrapai 19 November 1988 (age 29) 14
 Thailand Buranaprasertsuk, PorntipPorntip Buranaprasertsuk 24 October 1991 (age 26) 16
 Thailand Intanon, RatchanokRatchanok Intanon 5 February 1995 (age 23) 4
 Thailand Supajirakul, PuttitaPuttita Supajirakul 29 March 1996 (age 21) 17
 Thailand Taerattanachai, SapsireeSapsiree Taerattanachai 18 April 1992 (age 25) 17
 Turkey Bayrak, ÖzgeÖzge Bayrak 14 February 1992 (age 26) 52
 Ukraine Pochtarev, ArtemArtem Pochtarev 24 July 1993 (age 24) 75
 Ukraine Ulitina, MarijaMarija Ulitina 5 November 1991 (age 26) 64
 United States Chew, PhillipPhillip Chew 16 May 1994 (age 23) 35 27
 United States Pongnairat, SattawatSattawat Pongnairat 8 May 1990 (age 27) 35
 United States Shu, HowardHoward Shu 28 November 1990 (age 27) 62
 United States Lee, EvaEva Lee 7 August 1986 (age 31) 26
 United States Obanana, Paula LynnPaula Lynn Obanana 19 March 1985 (age 32) 26
 United States Subandhi, JamieJamie Subandhi 15 February 1989 (age 29) 27
 United States Wang, IrisIris Wang 2 September 1994 (age 23) 35
 Vietnam Tiến Minh, NguyễnNguyễn Tiến Minh 12 February 1983 (age 35) 33
 Vietnam Thị Trang, VũVũ Thị Trang 19 May 1992 (age 25) 44

This is the list of the Badminton players who participated at the 2016 Summer Olympicsin Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 11–20 August 2016.

Medal summary

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 China 2 0 1 3
2 Indonesia 1 0 0 1
Japan 1 0 1 2
Spain 1 0 0 1
5 Malaysia 0 3 0 3
6 Denmark 0 1 1 2
7 India 0 1 0 1
8 Great Britain 0 0 1 1
South Korea 0 0 1 1
Total 5 5 5 15

Medalists[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men’s singles
details
Chen Long
 China
Lee Chong Wei
 Malaysia
Viktor Axelsen
 Denmark
Men’s doubles
details
 China (CHN)
Fu Haifeng
Zhang Nan
 Malaysia (MAS)
Goh V Shem
Tan Wee Kiong
 Great Britain (GBR)
Chris Langridge
Marcus Ellis
Women’s singles
details
Carolina Marin
 Spain
P.V. Sindhu
 India
Nozomi Okuhara
 Japan
Women’s doubles
details
 Japan (JPN)
Misaki Matsutomo
Ayaka Takahashi
 Denmark (DEN)
Christinna Pedersen
Kamilla Rytter Juhl
 South Korea (KOR)
Jung Kyung-eun
Shin Seung-chan
Mixed doubles
details
 Indonesia (INA)
Tontowi Ahmad
Liliyana Natsir
 Malaysia (MAS)
Chan Peng Soon
Goh Liu Ying
 China (CHN)
Zhang Nan
Zhao Yunlei

Results[edit]

Men’s singles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Lee Chong Wei (MAS) 21 21
C1   Chou Tien-chen (TPE) 9 15
A1   Lee Chong Wei (MAS) 15 21 22
E1   Lin Dan (CHN) 21 11 20
E1   Lin Dan (CHN) 21 11 21
H1   Srikanth Kidambi (IND) 6 21 18
A1   Lee Chong Wei (MAS) 18 18
P1   Chen Long (CHN) 21 21
I1   Rajiv Ouseph (GBR) 12 16
L1   Viktor Axelsen (DEN) 21 21
L1   Viktor Axelsen (DEN) 14 15
P1   Chen Long (CHN) 21 21 Bronze Medal Match
N1   Son Wan-ho (KOR) 11 21 11
P1   Chen Long (CHN) 21 18 21 E1   Lin Dan (CHN) 21 10 17
L1   Viktor Axelsen (DEN) 15 21 21

Women’s singles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Carolina Marín (ESP) 21 21
C1   Sung Ji-hyun (KOR) 12 16
A1   Carolina Marín (ESP) 21 21
E1   Li Xuerui (CHN) 14 16
E1   Li Xuerui (CHN) 21 21
H1   Porntip Buranaprasertsuk (THA) 12 17
A1   Carolina Marín (ESP) 19 21 21
M1   P. V. Sindhu (IND) 21 12 15
J1   Nozomi Okuhara (JPN) 11 21 21
K1   Akane Yamaguchi (JPN) 21 17 10
J1   Nozomi Okuhara (JPN) 19 10
M1   P. V. Sindhu (IND) 21 21 Bronze Medal Match
M1   P. V. Sindhu (IND) 22 21
P1   Wang Yihan (CHN) 20 19 E1   Li Xuerui (CHN) w / o
J1   Nozomi Okuhara (JPN)

Men’s doubles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Vladimir Ivanov (RUS)
 Ivan Sozonov (RUS)
13 21 16
D2   Chai Biao (CHN)
 Hong Wei (CHN)
21 16 21
D2   Chai Biao (CHN)
 Hong Wei (CHN)
18 21 17
B1   Goh V Shem (MAS)
 Tan Wee Kiong (MAS)
21 12 21
B1   Goh V Shem (MAS)
 Tan Wee Kiong (MAS)
17 21 21
A2   Lee Yong-dae (KOR)
 Yoo Yeon-seong (KOR)
21 18 19
B1   Goh V Shem (MAS)
 Tan Wee Kiong (MAS)
21 11 21
B2   Fu Haifeng (CHN)
 Zhang Nan (CHN)
16 21 23
B2   Fu Haifeng (CHN)
 Zhang Nan (CHN)
11 21 24
C1   Kim Gi-jung (KOR)
 Kim Sa-rang (KOR)
21 18 22
B2   Fu Haifeng (CHN)
 Zhang Nan (CHN)
21 21
C2   Marcus Ellis (GBR)
 Chris Langridge (GBR)
14 18 Bronze Medal Match
C2   Marcus Ellis (GBR)
 Chris Langridge (GBR)
21 21
D1   Hiroyuki Endo (JPN)
 Kenichi Hayakawa (JPN)
19 17 D2   Chai Biao (CHN)
 Hong Wei (CHN)
18 21 10
C2   Chris Langridge (GBR)
 Marcus Ellis (GBR)
21 19 21

Women’s doubles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Misaki Matsutomo (JPN)
 Ayaka Takahashi (JPN)
21 18 21
C2   Vivian Hoo Kah Mun (MAS)
 Woon Khe Wei (MAS)
16 21 9
A1   Misaki Matsutomo (JPN)
 Ayaka Takahashi (JPN)
21 21
B1   Jung Kyung-eun (KOR)
 Shin Seung-chan (KOR)
16 15
B1   Jung Kyung-eun (KOR)
 Shin Seung-chan (KOR)
21 20 21
A2   Eefje Muskens (NED)
 Selena Piek (NED)
13 22 14
A1   Misaki Matsutomo (JPN)
 Ayaka Takahashi (JPN)
18 21 21
B2   Christinna Pedersen (DEN)
 Kamilla Rytter Juhl (DEN)
21 9 19
D2   Tang Yuanting (CHN)
 Yu Yang (CHN)
21 21
C1   Nitya Krishinda Maheswari (INA)
 Greysia Polii (INA)
11 14
D2   Tang Yuanting (CHN)
 Yu Yang (CHN)
16 21 19
B2   Christinna Pedersen (DEN)
 Kamilla Rytter Juhl (DEN)
21 14 21 Bronze Medal Match
B2   Christinna Pedersen (DEN)
 Kamilla Rytter Juhl (DEN)
28 18 21
D1   Chang Ye-na (KOR)
 Lee So-hee (KOR)
26 21 15 B1   Jung Kyung-eun (KOR)
 Shin Seung-chan (KOR)
21 21
D2   Tang Yuanting (CHN)
 Yu Yang (CHN)
8 17

Mixed doubles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Zhang Nan (CHN)
 Zhao Yunlei (CHN)
21 21
D2   Kenta Kazuno (JPN)
 Ayane Kurihara (JPN)
14 12
A1   Zhang Nan (CHN)
 Zhao Yunlei (CHN)
16 15
C1   Tontowi Ahmad (INA)
 Liliyana Natsir (INA)
21 21
C1   Tontowi Ahmad (INA)
 Liliyana Natsir (INA)
21 21
A2   Praveen Jordan (INA)
 Debby Susanto (INA)
16 11
C1   Tontowi Ahmad (INA)
 Liliyana Natsir (INA)
21 21
C2   Chan Peng Soon (MAS)
 Goh Liu Ying (MAS)
14 12
C2   Chan Peng Soon (MAS)
 Goh Liu Ying (MAS)
21 21
B1   Robert Mateusiak (POL)
 Nadiezda Zieba (POL)
17 10
C2   Chan Peng Soon (MAS)
 Goh Liu Ying (MAS)
21 21
B2   Xu Chen (CHN)
 Ma Jin (CHN)
12 19 Bronze Medal Match
B2   Xu Chen (CHN)
 Ma Jin (CHN)
21 21
D1   Ko Sung-hyun (KOR)
 Kim Ha-na (KOR)
17 18 A1   Zhang Nan (CHN)
 Zhao Yunlei (CHN)
21 21
B2   Xu Chen (CHN)
 Ma Jin (CHN)
7 11

Athletics at the 2016 Summer Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Athletics
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Athletics, Rio 2016.png
Venue Pontal (race walk)
Estádio Olímpico João Havelange
(track & field)
Sambódromo (marathon)
Dates 12–21 August
«2012 2020»
Athletics at the
2016 Summer Olympics
Athletics pictogram.svg
List of athletes
Track events
100 m men women
200 m men women
400 m men women
800 m men women
1500 m men women
5000 m men women
10,000 m men women
100 m hurdles women
110 m hurdles men
400 m hurdles men women
3000 m
steeplechase
men women
4 × 100 m relay men women
4 × 400 m relay men women
Road events
Marathon men women
20 km walk men women
50 km walk men
Field events
Long jump men women
Triple jump men women
High jump men women
Pole vault men women
Shot put men women
Discus throw men women
Javelin throw men women
Hammer throw men women
Combined events
Heptathlon women
Decathlon men

Athletics at the 2016 Summer Olympics were held during the last 10 days of the games, from 12–21 August 2016, at the Olympic Stadium. The sport of athletics in the 2016 Summer Olympics was split into three distinct sets of events: track and field events, road running events, and racewalking events.

Competition schedule[edit]

Track and field events were held at João Havelange Olympic Stadium, while the race walks and marathon start and finish in Recreio dos Bandeirantes and Sambódromo, respectively. Apart from the race walks and marathon, ten track and field events held finals in the morning session for the first time since 1988. This was implemented upon the request of the Rio 2016 Organizing Committee and the Olympic Broadcasting Service to be supported by the International Olympic Committee, ensuring that they received maximum visibility for the sport across all time zones.[2][3]

In the tables below, M stands for morning and A for afternoon.

Q Qualifiers H Heats ½ Semifinals F Final
Men[4]
Date → Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20 Sun 21
Event ↓ M A M A M A M A M A M A M A M A M A M A
100 m Q H ½ F
200 m H ½ F
400 m H ½ F
800 m H ½ F
1500 m H ½ F
5000 m H F
10,000 m F
110 m hurdles H ½ F
400 m hurdles H ½ F
3000 m steeplechase H F
4 × 100 m relay H F
4 × 400 m relay H F
Marathon F
20 km walk F
50 km walk F
Long jump Q F
Triple jump Q F
High jump Q F
Pole vault Q F
Shot put Q F
Discus throw Q F
Javelin throw Q F
Hammer throw Q F
Decathlon F
Women[4]
Date → Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20 Sun 21
Event ↓ M A M A M A M A M A M A M A M A M A M A
100 m Q H ½ F
200 m H ½ F
400 m H ½ F
800 m H ½ F
1500 m H ½ F
5000 m H F
10,000 m F
100 m hurdles H ½ F
400 m hurdles H ½ F
3000 m steeplechase H F
4 × 100 m relay H F
4 × 400 m relay H F
Marathon F
20 km walk F
Long jump Q F
Triple jump Q F
High jump Q F
Pole vault Q F
Shot put Q F
Discus throw Q F
Javelin throw Q F
Hammer throw Q F
Heptathlon F

Qualification[edit]

The Olympic qualification criteria were simplified by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) from a two-tiered “A” and “B” standard approach to a single qualification standard. Each National Olympic Committee was entitled to send up to three athletes per event that had reached that standard in the period from 2015 to 11 July 2016. Nations without a qualified athlete could enter one male and one female athlete who had not achieved the standard. Marathon runners had additional ways to qualify in that top 20 World Championship or top 10 IAAF Gold Label race finishers were treated as having achieved the standard.[5]

The relay teams entered were the top eight finishers at the 2015 IAAF World Relays plus the next eight highest ranking teams on the seasonal lists (based on an aggregate of their best two times).[6]

Nations with a strong tradition in athletics which had many qualified athletes available for events typically held selection trials to determine their teams (such as the 2016 United States Olympic Trials), or relied on panel decisions by their national governing bodies to determine which athletes could compete.

Daily summaries[edit]

Marathon runner Vanderlei de Limalighting the Olympic flame

At the opening ceremony two figures from the sport of athletics played a key role: Olympic medallist in the marathon, Vanderlei de Lima, lit the Olympic flame for his home nation, while Kenya’s Kipchoge Keino became the first recipient of theOlympic Laurel for his efforts in promoting sport.[7] Unlike most Suummer Olympic Gams, the athletics stadium was not the venue for the opening ceremony in Rio de Janeiro – that honour went to Brazil’s foremost soccer venue, the Maracanã Stadium.[8]

First three days[edit]

On the first day, the first gold medal was won by Almaz Ayana of Ethiopia, who broke a long-standing world record in the women’s 10,000 metres by almost fifteen seconds. The race as a whole was historically fast, setting four of the five fastest times ever for the distance and seeing eight national records broken. China’s Wang Zhen was the first male winner of the 2016 Olympic athletics, topping the 20 kilometres race walk podium. With her final throw of the event, Michelle Carter won the United States’ first ever title in the women’s shot put, preventing Valerie Adams from winning a third straight title. The first half of the heptathlon saw two athletes set a world heptathlon best: Belgium’s Nafissatou Thiam and Great Britain’s Katarina Johnson-Thompson both cleared 1.98 m (6 ft 534 in) for the high jump.[9] (Their marks would have been sufficient for the individual high jump gold.)[10]

Mo Farah leading in the men’s 10,000 metres final

The second day opened with a first in Olympic history as a man succeeded his brother as Olympic champion. In a dramatic final round, German discus throwerChristoph Harting moved up from fourth to gold medal position with a personal best throw and topped the podium as his brother Robert Harting had four years earlier.Mo Farah – a double-Olympic champion from 2012 – defended his 10,000 m crown in spite of a fall which saw him slip to the back of the pack during the middle of race. Farah had been one of three gold medallists for Great Britain on a “Super Saturday” for the host nation at the 2012 London Games, but the two others of that day did not prevail in Rio de Janeiro. Jessica Ennis entered as favourite for the Olympic heptathlon but was runner-up to Belgian Nafissatou Thiam in an upset which saw the 21-year-old add over three hundred points to her personal best score. Defending Olympic long jump champion Greg Rutherford was reduced to third place as American Jeff Henderson won the closely fought men’s competition. Another defending champion was dethroned in the women’s 100 metres: Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce‘s attempt to become the first person to win three straight Olympic track titles was thwarted by Jamaican teammate Elaine Thompson.[11]

Usain Bolt winning the 100 m final

The morning final for the third day was the women’s marathon, which saw Jemima Sumgong win Kenya’s first Olympic gold medal for that event. The race was unusual in that two sets of twins crossed the line together: North Korea’s Kim Hye-song andKim Hye-gyong took tenth and eleventh while Germans Anna and Lisa Hahner were 81st and 82nd. Furthermore Estonia’s Lily, Leila and Liina Luik became the first triplets to feature in an Olympic final. In the women’s triple jump Caterine Ibargüenwon Colombia’s first Olympic gold medal in athletics. Usain Bolt achieved the feat fellow Jamaican Fraser-Pryce had failed to do one day earlier by taking his third straight Olympic 100 m title. This made him the most decorated athlete in the 100 metres at the Olympics. South Africa’s Wayde van Niekerk provided the second world record performance of the athletics programme with his win of the men’s 400 metres in 43.03 seconds. This knocked 0.15 seconds of Michael Johnson‘s time which had gone unbeaten since 1999.[12]

Days 4, 5 and 6[edit]

The third and last athletics world record at the Olympics came on day four. Poland’s Anita Włodarczyk was dominant in thehammer throw, becoming the first woman to throw beyond eighty metres three times in a competition and adding over a metre to her own world record with 82.29 m (269 ft 1134 in). Four of her six throws would have been sufficient to win. Another record was in sight for Ruth Jebet in the women’s 3000 metres steeplechase, though she missed the mark by a second after slowing to celebrate winning Bahrain’s first Olympic gold in any sport. In the women’s 400 m Allyson Felix was stopped from winning an historic fifth Olympic gold by Shaunae Miller of the Bahamas, who dived at the line to win the race. Men’s 800 metres world record holder David Rudisha defended his 800 m Olympic title, being the first man in over half a century to achieve that. A surprise victory for the hosts came via Thiago Braz da Silva, who added ten centimetres to his previous best to win in an Olympic record of 6.03 m ahead of world record holder Renaud Lavillenie of France.[13] Departing from Olympic traditions, the home crowd booed Lavillenie while he was attempting his final vault and he was booed again at the medal ceremony after comparing his treatment to that of Jesse Owens at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Nazi Germany. The partisan treatment was criticised by da Silva, IOC President Thomas Bach and IAAF president Sebastian Coe, though defended by some as an intrinsic part of Brazilian sporting culture.[14][15][16]

On the fifth morning, Croatia’s Sandra Perković became the only woman to defend an individual Olympic athletics title that year, topping the discus podium. Christian Taylor became the only man in the field events to defend his 2012 Olympic title, repeating his American 1–2 finish with teammate Will Claye. The United States was less successful in the men’s 110 metres hurdles: its athletes failed to gain a medal for the first time ever (bar the 1980 boycott) while Jamaican Omar McLeod won by over a tenth of a second. Faith Kipyegon was a clear winner in the women’s 1500 metres ahead of Ethiopia’s Genzebe Dibaba. Derek Drouin won Canada’s first Olympic gold in athletics in twenty years in the men’s high jump.[17] In the women’s 5000 m heats American Abbey D’Agostino and Nikki Hamblin of New Zealand fell during the race. D’Agostino stopped to help Hamblin to her feet, but then struggled herself with an injured ankle, which led Hamblin to help in turn so the pair could finish. The pair were later given the Fair Play award by the International Fair Play Committee for their show of sportsmanship.[18]

Conseslus Kipruto en route to the steeplechase title

In his last Olympic outing, Ezekiel Kemboi failed to defend his Olympic steeplechase title, which went to his Kenyan teammate Conseslus Kipruto in an Olympic record time. Kemboi’s initial bronze medal would have made him the first person to win three Olympic steeplechase medals, but a single step into the infield later saw him disqualified and Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad of France achieve that feat in his place. Tianna Bartoletta beat the favourite in the women’s long jump, clearing a personal best of 7.17 m in the second to last round to leave her American rivalBrittney Reese with a silver medal. Americans also occupied the top spots in the women’s 100 metres hurdles with Brianna Rollins, Nia Ali and Kristi Castlin forming the first ever Olympic medal sweep by a nation in that event. The 100 m gold medallist Elaine Thompson completed a sprint double for Jamaica by defeating Dutch athlete Dafne Schippers in the women’s 200 metres final. High profile eliminations came in the men’s qualifiers as two strong contenders for Olympic titles, Paweł Fajdek in the hammer and Justin Gatlin in the 200 m, failed to progress.[19]

Final three days[edit]

Bolt with his third 200 m victory

The 400 metres hurdles finals were contested on day seven: Kerron Clement won the United States’s 19th men’s title and in contrast Dalilah Muhammad became the first American female winner. On a day of strong American performances, Ashton Eaton defended his decathlon title in an Olympic record score of 8893 points and in the men’s shot put Ryan Crouser greatly improved his best to 22.52 m (73 ft 1012 in) to break Ulf Timmermann‘s Olympic record from 1988 (among men’s Olympic records, only Bob Beamon‘s long jump had stood for longer).[20] The women’s javelin throw had an unexpected winner in Croatia’s Sara Kolak, whose winning mark of 66.18 m (217 ft 112 in) meant the 21-year-old had improved her best by over eight metres that year. The favourite delivered in the men’s 200 m, with Usain Bolt taking his third straight Olympic 200 m title by a margin of a quarter of a second. The women’s 4 × 100 metres relay heats featured the first ever re-run – Brazil has obstructed the American baton handover and the United States were allowed a solo run to qualify for the final on time, which they did.[21]

The American team after winning 4 × 100 m relay gold

The morning of the penultimate day began with two racewalking finals. In the men’s 50 km walk Matej Tóth overtook defending champion Jarred Tallent to win Slovakia’s first Olympic gold in athletics while Liu Hong return China to the top of the women’s 20 km walk podium. Ekaterini Stefanidi of Greece won the women’s pole vault after the pre-event favourites faltered. Dilshod Nazarov made history in the men’s hammer throw by becoming Tajikistan’s first Olympic gold medallist. Vivian Cheruiyot achieved a first for her country in the women’s 5000 metres by outrunning 10,000 m champion Almaz Ayana to take Kenya’s first ever gold in the distance event. In that race, Cheruiyot set the last of eight Olympic records in Rio. The 4 × 100 m finals delivered new highs for Olympic athletics. The American women overcame their qualification troubles by winning from lane one, making Allyson Felix the most successful female Olympian in athletics at five gold medals. Usain Bolt anchored the Jamaican men to the gold to complete a set of three consecutive victories across the 100 m, 200 m and relay (referred to as a “treble treble”). Bolt equalled Carl Lewis and Paavo Nurmi‘s record of nine Olympic gold medals in athletics.[22][23]

Vivian Cheruiyot celebrating Kenya’s first 5000 m women’s title

On the ninth and final day of action in the track and field stadium, Matthew Centrowitz Jr. secured a tactical win in the men’s 1500 m while Caster Semenyaused her sheer speed to win the women’s 800 m. Behind her Francine Niyonsabawon only the second ever medal for Burundi at the Olympics. In the women’s high jump, Ruth Beitia became Spain’s first female Olympic champion in athletics, though this was overshadowed by the fact her winning mark was the lowest since 1980 and she was outperformed by two heptathletes in Rio.[24] Thomas Röhler cleared ninety metres to win the men’s javelin throw. Mo Farah became the second most successful track athlete of the 2016 Rio Olympics by defending his 5000 m title, making him one of only two men alongside Finland’s Lasse Virén to have defended both long-distance titles at consecutive Olympics. In the last track events of the games, the United States won both the 4 × 400 metres relays. Their victory in the women’s race meant Allyson Felix set a record high for women’s Olympic athletics with six gold medals and nine medals overall.[25] The men’s marathon was contested on the last day of the Olympics and Eliud Kipchoge comfortably won by the largest margin since 1972.[26]

As in previous years, the United States won the most medals in athletics and at thirteen golds and 32 overall they won more than double the next most successful nations. In the absence of Russia, Kenya and Jamaica placed second and third with six gold medals and the only other nations to win more than ten medals in total. In the 2016 Olympic athletics programme, 141 medals were awarded and 43 nations reached the medal table.

Medal summary[edit]

Men[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 metres
details
Usain Bolt
 Jamaica
9.81 Justin Gatlin
 United States
9.89 Andre De Grasse
 Canada
9.91
200 metres
details
Usain Bolt
 Jamaica
19.78 Andre De Grasse
 Canada
20.02 Christophe Lemaitre
 France
20.12
400 metres
details
Wayde van Niekerk
 South Africa
43.03 WR Kirani James
 Grenada
43.76 LaShawn Merritt
 United States
43.85
800 metres
details
David Rudisha
 Kenya
1:42.15 Taoufik Makhloufi
 Algeria
1:42.61NR Clayton Murphy
 United States
1:42.93
1500 metres
details
Matthew Centrowitz, Jr.
 United States
3:50.00 Taoufik Makhloufi
 Algeria
3:50.11 Nick Willis
 New Zealand
3:50.24
5,000 metres
details
Mo Farah
 Great Britain
13:03.30 Paul Kipkemoi Chelimo
 United States
13:03.90 Hagos Gebrhiwet
 Ethiopia
13:04.35
10,000 metres
details
Mo Farah
 Great Britain
27:05.17 Paul Tanui
 Kenya
27:05.64 Tamirat Tola
 Ethiopia
27:06.26
110 metres hurdles
details
Omar McLeod
 Jamaica
13.05 Orlando Ortega
 Spain
13.17 Dimitri Bascou
 France
13.24
400 metres hurdles
details
Kerron Clement
 United States
47.73 Boniface Mucheru Tumuti
 Kenya
47.78 NR Yasmani Copello
 Turkey
47.92NR
3000 metres steeplechase
details
Conseslus Kipruto
 Kenya
8:03.28 OR Evan Jager
 United States
8:04.28 Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad
 France
8:11.52
4 × 100 metres relay
details
 Jamaica (JAM)
Asafa Powell,
Yohan Blake,
Nickel Ashmeade,
Usain Bolt,
Jevaughn Minzie,
Kemar Bailey-Cole
37.27  Japan (JPN)
Ryota Yamagata,
Shota Iizuka,
Yoshihide Kiryu,
Asuka Cambridge
37.60 AR  Canada (CAN)
Akeem Haynes,
Aaron Brown,
Brendon Rodney,
Andre De Grasse,
Mobolade Ajomale
37.64NR
4 × 400 metres relay
details
 United States (USA)
Arman Hall,
Tony McQuay,
Gil Roberts,
LaShawn Merritt,
Kyle Clemons,
David Verburg,
2:57.30  Jamaica (JAM)
Peter Matthews,
Nathon Allen,
Fitzroy Dunkley,
Javon Francis,
Rusheen McDonald
2:58.16  Bahamas (BAH)
Alonzo Russell,
Michael Mathieu,
Steven Gardiner,
Chris Brown,
Stephen Newbold
2:58.49
Marathon
details
Eliud Kipchoge
 Kenya
2:08:44 Feyisa Lilesa
 Ethiopia
2:09:54 Galen Rupp
 United States
2:10:05
20 kilometres walk
details
Wang Zhen
 China
1:19:14 Cai Zelin
 China
1:19:26 Dane Bird-Smith
 Australia
1:19:37
50 kilometres walk
details
Matej Tóth
 Slovakia
3:40:58 Jared Tallent
 Australia
3:41:16 Hirooki Arai
 Japan
3:41:24
High jump
details
Derek Drouin
 Canada
2.38 m Mutaz Essa Barshim
 Qatar
2.36 m Bohdan Bondarenko
 Ukraine
2.33 m
Pole vault
details
Thiago Braz da Silva
 Brazil
6.03 m OR,AR Renaud Lavillenie
 France
5.98 m Sam Kendricks
 United States
5.85 m
Long jump
details
Jeff Henderson
 United States
8.38 m Luvo Manyonga
 South Africa
8.37 m Greg Rutherford
 Great Britain
8.29 m
Triple jump
details
Christian Taylor
 United States
17.86 m Will Claye
 United States
17.76 m Dong Bin
 China
17.58 m
Shot put
details
Ryan Crouser
 United States
22.52 mOR Joe Kovacs
 United States
21.78 m Tomas Walsh
 New Zealand
21.36 m
Discus throw
details
Christoph Harting
 Germany
68.37 m Piotr Małachowski
 Poland
67.55 m Daniel Jasinski
 Germany
67.05 m
Hammer throw
details
Dilshod Nazarov
 Tajikistan
78.68 m Ivan Tsikhan
 Belarus
77.79 m Wojciech Nowicki
 Poland
77.73 m
Javelin throw
details
Thomas Röhler
 Germany
90.30 m Julius Yego
 Kenya
88.24 m Keshorn Walcott
 Trinidad and Tobago
85.38 m
Decathlon
details
Ashton Eaton
 United States
8893 ptsOR Kévin Mayer
 France
8834 ptsNR Damian Warner
 Canada
8666 pts

* Indicates the athlete only competed in the preliminary heats and received medals.

Women[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 metres
details
Elaine Thompson
 Jamaica
10.71 Tori Bowie
 United States
10.83 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
 Jamaica
10.86
200 metres
details
Elaine Thompson
 Jamaica
21.78 Dafne Schippers
 Netherlands
21.88 Tori Bowie
 United States
22.15
400 metres
details
Shaunae Miller
 Bahamas
49.44 Allyson Felix
 United States
49.51 Shericka Jackson
 Jamaica
49.85
800 metres
details
Caster Semenya
 South Africa
1:55.28NR Francine Niyonsaba
 Burundi
1:56.49 Margaret Wambui
 Kenya
1:56.89
1500 metres
details
Faith Kipyegon
 Kenya
4:08.92 Genzebe Dibaba
 Ethiopia
4:10.27 Jennifer Simpson
 United States
4:10.53
5000 metres
details
Vivian Cheruiyot
 Kenya
14:26.17OR Hellen Onsando Obiri
 Kenya
14:29.77 Almaz Ayana
 Ethiopia
14:33.59
10,000 metres
details
Almaz Ayana
 Ethiopia
29:17.45WR Vivian Cheruiyot
 Kenya
29:32.53NR Tirunesh Dibaba
 Ethiopia
29:42.56
100 metres hurdles
details
Brianna Rollins
 United States
12.48 Nia Ali
 United States
12.59 Kristi Castlin
 United States
12.61
400 metres hurdles
details
Dalilah Muhammad
 United States
53.13 Sara Petersen
 Denmark
53.55 NR Ashley Spencer
 United States
53.72
3000 metres steeplechase
details
Ruth Jebet
 Bahrain
8:59.75AR Hyvin Jepkemoi
 Kenya
9:07.12 Emma Coburn
 United States
9:07.63AR
4 × 100 metres relay
details
 United States (USA)
Tianna Bartoletta,
Allyson Felix,
English Gardner,
Tori Bowie,
Morolake Akinosun
41.02  Jamaica (JAM)
Christania Williams,
Elaine Thompson,
Veronica Campbell-Brown,
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce,
Simone Facey,
Sashalee Forbes
41.36  Great Britain (GBR)
Asha Philip,
Desiree Henry,
Dina Asher-Smith,
Daryll Neita,
41.77 NR
4 × 400 metres relay
details
 United States (USA)
Allyson Felix,
Phyllis Francis,
Natasha Hastings,
Courtney Okolo,
Taylor Ellis-Watson,
Francena McCorory
3:19.06  Jamaica (JAM)
Stephenie Ann McPherson,
Anneisha McLaughlin-Whilby,
Shericka Jackson,
Novlene Williams-Mills,
Christine Day,
Chrisann Gordon
3:20.34  Great Britain (GBR)
Eilidh Doyle,
Anyika Onuora,
Emily Diamond,
Christine Ohuruogu,
Kelly Massey
3:25.88
Marathon
details
Jemima Sumgong
 Kenya
2:24:04 Eunice Kirwa
 Bahrain
2:24:13 Mare Dibaba
 Ethiopia
2:24:30
20 kilometres walk
details
Liu Hong
 China
1:28:35 María Guadalupe González
 Mexico
1:28:37 Lü Xiuzhi
 China
1:28:42
High jump
details
Ruth Beitia
 Spain
1.97 m Mirela Demireva
 Bulgaria
1.97 m Blanka Vlašić
 Croatia
1.97 m
Pole vault
details
Ekaterini Stefanidi
 Greece
4.85 m Sandi Morris
 United States
4.85 m Eliza McCartney
 New Zealand
4.80 mNR
Long jump
details
Tianna Bartoletta
 United States
7.17 m Britney Reese
 United States
7.15 m Ivana Španović
 Serbia
7.08 mNR
Triple jump
details
Caterine Ibargüen
 Colombia
15.17 m Yulimar Rojas
 Venezuela
14.98 m Olga Rypakova
 Kazakhstan
14.74 m
Shot put
details
Michelle Carter
 United States
20.63 mNR Valerie Adams
 New Zealand
20.42 m Anita Márton
 Hungary
19.87 m NR
Discus throw
details
Sandra Perković
 Croatia
69.21 m Mélina Robert-Michon
 France
66.73 mNR Denia Caballero
 Cuba
65.34 m
Hammer throw
details
Anita Włodarczyk
 Poland
82.29 mWR Zhang Wenxiu
 China
76.75 m Sophie Hitchon
 Great Britain
74.54 mNR
Javelin throw
details
Sara Kolak
 Croatia
66.18 mNR Sunette Viljoen
 South Africa
64.92 m Barbora Špotáková
 Czech Republic
64.80 m
Heptathlon
details
Nafissatou Thiam
 Belgium
6810 ptsNR Jessica Ennis-Hill
 Great Britain
6775 pts Brianne Theisen-Eaton
 Canada
6653 pts

* Indicates the athlete only competed in the preliminary heats and received medals.

Medal table[edit]

Key

*   Host nation (Brazil)

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 United States 13 10 9 32
2 Kenya 6 6 1 13
3 Jamaica 6 3 2 11
4 China 2 2 2 6
5 South Africa 2 2 0 4
6 Great Britain 2 1 4 7
7 Croatia 2 0 1 3
Germany 2 0 1 3
9 Ethiopia 1 2 5 8
10 Canada 1 1 4 6
11 Poland 1 1 1 3
12 Bahrain 1 1 0 2
Spain 1 1 0 2
14 Bahamas 1 0 1 2
15 Belgium 1 0 0 1
Brazil* 1 0 0 1
Colombia 1 0 0 1
Greece 1 0 0 1
Slovakia 1 0 0 1
Tajikistan 1 0 0 1
21 France 0 3 3 6
22 Algeria 0 2 0 2
23 New Zealand 0 1 3 4
24 Australia 0 1 1 2
Japan 0 1 1 2
26 Belarus 0 1 0 1
Bulgaria 0 1 0 1
Burundi 0 1 0 1
Denmark 0 1 0 1
Grenada 0 1 0 1
Mexico 0 1 0 1
Netherlands 0 1 0 1
Qatar 0 1 0 1
Venezuela 0 1 0 1
36 Cuba 0 0 1 1
Czech Republic 0 0 1 1
Hungary 0 0 1 1
Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1
Serbia 0 0 1 1
Trinidad and Tobago 0 0 1 1
Turkey 0 0 1 1
Ukraine 0 0 1 1
Total 47 47 47 141

Records[edit]

World and Olympic records[edit]

Event Date Name Nationality Result Type
Women’s 10,000 metres 12 August Almaz Ayana Ethiopia 29:17.45 min WR
Men’s 400 metres 14 August Wayde van Niekerk South Africa 43.03 sec WR
Women’s hammer throw 15 August Anita Włodarczyk Poland 82.29 m WR
Men’s pole vault 15 August Thiago Braz da Silva Brazil 6.03 m OR
Men’s 3000 metres steeplechase 17 August Conseslus Kipruto Kenya 8:03.28 min OR
Men’s shot put 18 August Ryan Crouser United States 22.52 m OR
Men’s decathlon 18 August Ashton Eaton United States 8893 pts =OR
Women’s 5000 metres 19 August Vivian Cheruiyot Kenya 14:26.17 min OR

Continental records[edit]

The women’s 10,000 metres provided the first two continental records of the Olympics, in Almaz Ayana’s African record andMolly Huddle‘s record for the North, Central American and Caribbean region.[27]

Event Date Name Nationality Result Type
Women’s 10,000 metres 12 August Almaz Ayana Ethiopia 29:17.45 min AR
Women’s 10,000 metres 12 August Molly Huddle United States 30:13.17 min AR
Men’s 400 metres 14 August Wayde van Niekerk South Africa 43.03 sec AR
3000 metres steeplechase 15 August Ruth Jebet Bahrain 8:59.75 min AR
3000 metres steeplechase 15 August Emma Coburn United States 9:07.63 min AR
Women’s hammer throw 15 August Anita Włodarczyk Poland 82.29 m AR
Men’s 4 × 100 m relay 18 August Tang Xingqiang
Xie Zhenye
Su Bingtian
Zhang Peimeng
China 37.82 sec AR
Men’s 4 × 100 m relay 18 August Ryota Yamagata
Shota Iizuka
Yoshihide Kiryu
Asuka Cambridge
Japan 37.68 sec AR
Men’s 4 × 100 m relay 19 August Ryota Yamagata
Shota Iizuka
Yoshihide Kiryu
Asuka Cambridge
Japan 37.60 sec AR

Participation[edit]

Participating nations[edit]

Russia’s athletics team was banned from competing at the 2016 Summer Olympics on June 17, 2016, when the IAAF voted unanimously to prevent them from competing. This punishment is because of the ongoing Russian doping scandal.[28][29]Darya Klishina was the only Russian athlete allowed to participate.

The Refugee Olympic Team, in its first appearance, included six track and field athletes among it 10-strong team.[7]

[hide]Participating National Olympic Committees

Competitors[edit]

Doping[edit]

Russian Darya Klishina

The Olympic athletics competition was majorly affected by the ban of the All-Russia Athletic Federation (ARAF) by the sports governing body, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). The IAAF undertook this action to exclude all Russian athletes following the discovery of state-sponsored doping in Russia.[30] The Russian President accused the body of discrimination against his country’s athletes, saying the ban was a “collective punishment which has nothing to do with justice”. The Russian Minister for Sport, Vitaly Mutko, was directly implicated in the investigations.[31]

The members of Russia’s 68-strong team were allowed to appeal the ban and compete under a neutral flag if they could present evidence that they did not have links with the doping scandal and received testing independent of the Russian national anti-doping body. Only one athlete, United States-based long jumperDarya Klishina, met the criteria and was allowed to compete. Her selection garnered negative press in her home country.[32][33] The situation led pole vaulter Yelena Isinbayeva, one of Russia’s top athletes, to announce her intention to stand for ARAF President to resolve the crisis.[34]

Doping whistleblower Yuliya Stepanova was not allowed to compete

Yuliya Stepanova, a Russian runner who was key in unveiling the doping issue through her whistleblowing, attempted to gain permission from the international Olympic Committee to compete at the Games as an independent athlete, but was unsuccessful on the basis of her having previously failed a doping test. Her husband and coach Vitaly Stepanov, who also acted as whistleblower, said that the decision sent “a message that the World Anti-Doping Code and the values of Olympism are merely words on a page”.[35] The couple’s actions were widely denounced in Russia, with the president’s spokesman labelling the couple as “Judas”.[36]Stepanova received strong support from Travis Tygart, the head of the United States Anti-Doping Agency, who approved of her application to compete.[37]

Silvia Danekova of Bulgaria was the first athletics doping suspension at the Olympics, as the sample she had given on arrival was positive for EPO.[38] Two Kenyan officials were also sent home on doping points: coach John Anzrah impersonated runner Ferguson Rotich to give a doping control and Michael Rotich was expelled following allegations of forewarning athletes of unannounced drug tests.[39]

ICC Under-19 Cricket World Cup

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
ICC Under-19 Cricket World Cup
Administrator International Cricket Council
Format One Day International
First tournament 1988
Last tournament 2014
Tournament format Round-robin
Knock-out
Number of teams 16
Current champion  South Africa (1st title)
Most successful  Australia (3 titles)
 India (3 titles)

The ICC Under-19 Cricket World Cup is an international cricket tournament contested by national Under-19 teams. The tournament was not staged after its first edition in 1988 till 1998 and since then has been organised by the ICC as a biennial event. The number of competing teams in the tournament has increased from eight in 1988 to the present 16 giving an opportunity for a number of associate and affiliate teams to showcase their talent.

Summary of all teams in all tournaments[edit]

The table below provides an overview of the performances of teams over past Under 19 World Cups, as at the end of the2014 tournament. Teams are sorted by best performance, then winning percentage, then (if equal) by alphabetical order.

No longer exist.

Team Appearances Best result Statistics
Total First Latest Played Won Lost Tie NR Win%
 Australia 10 1988 2014 Champions (1988, 2002,2010) 67 50 15 0 2 76.92
 India 10 1988 2014 Champions (2000, 2008,2012) 65 47 17 0 1 73.43
 Pakistan 10 1988 2014 Champions (2004, 2006) 63 45 18 0 0 74.42
 South Africa 9 1998 2014 Champions (2014) 55 40 14 0 1 71.07
 England 10 1988 2014 Champions (1998) 63 36 26 0 1 58.06
 West Indies 10 1988 2014 Runners-up (2004) 65 39 26 0 0 60.00
 Sri Lanka 10 1988 2014 Runners-up (2000) 62 33 28 0 1 54.09
 New Zealand 10 1988 2014 Runners-up (1998) 60 28 31 0 1 47.45
 Bangladesh 9 1998 2014 5th place (2006) 58 40 16 1 1 71.05
 Zimbabwe 9 1998 2014 6th place (2004) 56 25 31 0 0 44.64
 Afghanistan 3 2010 2014 7th place (2014) 18 7 11 0 0 38.88
   Nepal 6 2000 2012 8th place (2000) 37 19 17 0 1 52.77
 Ireland 7 1998 2012 10th place (2010) 43 14 28 1 0 33.72
 Scotland 6 1998 2014 11th place (2012) 36 11 25 0 0 30.55
 Kenya 3 1998 2002 11th place (1998) 17 5 12 0 0 29.41
 Canada 4 2002 2014 11th place (2010) 23 3 18 1 1 15.90
 Namibia 7 1998 2014 11th place (2008) 41 6 34 1 0 15.85
 United States 2 2006 2010 12th place (2006) 11 2 8 0 1 20.00
 United Arab Emirates 1 2014 2014 12th place (2014) 6 1 5 0 0 16.66
 Papua New Guinea 7 1998 2014 12th place (2008,2010) 41 3 38 0 0 7.31
 Denmark 1 1998 1998 13th place (1998) 6 2 4 0 0 33.33
 Netherlands 1 2000 2000 14th place (2000) 6 1 4 0 1 20.00
 Hong Kong 1 2010 2010 14th place (2010) 6 1 5 0 0 16.66
 Uganda 2 2004 2006 14th place (2004,2006) 12 2 10 0 0 16.66
 Bermuda 1 2008 2008 15th place (2008) 5 1 4 0 0 20.00
 Malaysia 1 2008 2008 16th place (2008) 5 1 4 0 0 20.00
Americas 1 2000 2000 16th place (2000) 6 0 6 0 0 0.00
ICC Associates 1 1988 1988 8th place (1988) 7 0 7 0 0 0.00

No longer exist.

The result percentage excludes no results and counts ties as half a win

Team result by tournament[edit]

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • Q – Qualified for upcoming tournament
  • * – Team was ineligible for tournament
  • italics – Team is defunct
  •     — Hosts

History[edit]

1988 (Winner: Australia)[edit]

The inaugural event was titled the McDonald’s Bicentennial Youth World Cup, and was held in 1988 as part of theAustralian Bicentenary celebrations. It took place in South Australia and Victoria. Teams from the seven Test-playing nations, as well as an ICC Associates XI, competed in a round-robin format. Australia lost only one match, their final round-robin game against Pakistan by which time they had qualified for the semis. They went on to beat Pakistan by five wickets in the final, thanks to an unbeaten hundred from Brett Williams. England and West Indies made up the last four, but India were the real disappointments. After opening with a good win against England, they suffered hefty defeats in four matches to be knocked out early. The tournament was notable for the number of future international players who competed. Future England captains Nasser Hussain and Mike Atherton played, as did Indian spinner Venkatapathy Raju, New Zealand all-rounder Chris Cairns, Pakistanis Mushtaq Ahmed and Inzamam-ul-Haq, Sri Lankan Sanath Jayasuriya, and West IndiansBrian Lara, Ridley Jacobs, and Jimmy Adams. Australia’s Brett Williams was the leading run-scorer, with 471 runs at anaverage of 52.33. Wayne Holdsworth from Australia and Mushtaq Ahmed were the leading wicket-takers, with 19 wickets ataverages of 12.52 and 16.21 respectively.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 8 teams were: 1.Australia, 2.Pakistan, 3.West Indies, 4.England, 5.Sri Lanka, 6.India, 7.New Zealand, 8.ICC Associates

1998 (Winner: England)[edit]

England were the unexpected winners of the second Under-19 World Cup in South Africa. In 1998, the event was relaunched in South Africa as a biennial tournament. The only previous tournament of its kind was held ten years earlier. In addition to the nine Test-playing nations, there were teams from Bangladesh, Kenya, Scotland, Ireland, Denmark, Namibiaand Papua New Guinea. The teams were divided into four pools, named after Gavaskar, Sobers, Cowdrey and Bradman, and the top two sides from each progressed to two Super League pools, whose winners advanced to the final. In order to give everyone a decent amount of cricket, the non-qualifiers competed in a Plate League, won by Bangladesh, who beatWest Indies in the final. West Indies failed to qualify for the Super League after a fiasco concerning the composition of their squad – they arrived with seven players who contravened the age restrictions for the tournament. The Super League, in which every game was covered live on South African satellite television, also threw up a number of shocks and tense finishes; both pools came down to net run-rate at the finish. England, from being down and almost out, beat Pakistan – who surprisingly lost all three of their games – but lost a rain-affected match to India. Australia had beaten India and Pakistan and were favourites to reach the final. Only a massive defeat by England could deny them: but that is precisely what they suffered. In front of a crowd of about 6,000 at Newlands, they were bowled out for 147. New Zealand joined England in the final, where a century from England’s Stephen Peters won the day. Chris Gayle was the tournament’s leading run-scorer, with 364 runs at an average of 72.80. West Indian Ramnaresh Sarwan and Zimbabwean Mluleki Nkala were the leading wicket-takers, with 16 wickets at 10.81 and 13.06 respectively.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 16 teams were: 1.England, 2.New Zealand, 3.South Africa, 4.Australia, 5.India, 6.Sri Lanka, 7.Pakistan, 8.Zimbabwe, 9.Bangladesh, 10.West Indies, 11.Kenya, 12.Scotland, 13.Denmark, 14.Ireland, 15.Namibia, 16.Papua New Guinea

2000 (Winner: India)[edit]

The 2000 tournament was held in Sri Lanka, and replicated the format from 1998. Participating nations included the nine Test-playing nations, as well as Bangladesh, Kenya, Ireland, Namibia, Holland, Nepal and the Americas. To the disappointment of a large crowd at Colombo’s SSC, Sri Lanka fell at the final hurdle in a final dominated by India. The winners remained unbeaten throughout, and destroyed Australia by 170 runs in the semi-final to underline their supremacy. In the other semi-final, Sri Lanka delighted a crowd of 5000 at Galle by beating Pakistan. The fact that three of the four semi-finalists were from Asia and so more attuned to the conditions was coincidental – they played the better cricket and, in Pakistan’s case, had a very experienced squad. England, the defending champions, were most disappointing, and they won only one match against a Test-playing country, and that a last-ball victory over Zimbabwe. South Africa, one of the favourites, were desperately unlucky to be eliminated after three no-results gave them three points while Nepal, with four points courtesy of one win over Kenya, went through to the Super League instead. The format of the tournament was as in 1997-98, with four groups of four and then a Super League and final. Graeme Smith was the tournament’s leading run-scorer, with 348 runs at an average of 87.00. Pakistan’s Zahid Saeed was the leading wicket-taker, with 15 wickets at 7.60. India’s Yuvraj Singh was named Man of the Series. India clinched the title for the first time under the captaincy ofMohammed Kaif.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 16 teams were: 1.India, 2.Sri Lanka, 3.Pakistan, 4.Australia, 5.West Indies, 6.England, 7.New Zealand, 8.Nepal, 9.South Africa, 10.Bangladesh, 11.Zimbabwe, 12.Ireland, 13.Kenya, 14.Netherlands, 15.Namibia, 16.Americas

2002 (Winner: Australia)[edit]

The fourth Under-19 World Cup held in New Zealand only confirmed Australia’s dominance of the game, and from their opening match, when they obliterated Kenya by 430 runs, through to their comprehensive victory over South Africa in the final, they were never threatened. Participating nations included the ten Test-playing nations, plus Canada, Kenya, Namibia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, and Scotland. Their captain, Cameron White, was singled out for praise for his leadership, and he chipped in with 423 runs at 70.50. And they didn’t rely on pace either, playing only two seamers and four slow bowlers, with Xavier Doherty, a slow left-armer, leading the wicket-takers with 16 at 9.50 and all without a single wide. In contrast, India, the holders, underperformed in their semi-final against South Africa, a team they had easily beaten a week or so earlier. They also suffered embarrassing defeats to neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Pakistan, however, provided the main upset when they lost to Nepal by 30 runs, and Nepal also gave England a few uneasy moments. Zimbabwe won the plate competition, with their expected opponents, Bangladesh, beaten in the semi-final by Nepal. Australian Cameron Whitewas the tournament’s leading run-scorer, with 423 runs at an average of 70.50 and Xavier Doherty was the leading wicket-taker, with 16 wickets at 9.50. Tatenda Taibu, Zimbabwe’s captain, was Man of the Series for his 250 runs and 12 wickets, not to mention his wicket-keeping in between bowling stints.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 16 teams were: 1.Australia, 2.South Africa, 3.India, 4.West Indies, 5.Pakistan, 6.New Zealand, 7.England, 8.Sri Lanka, 9.Zimbabwe, 10.Nepal, 11.Bangladesh, 12.Namibia, 13.Scotland, 14.Kenya, 15.Canada, 16.Papua New Guinea

2004 (Winner: Pakistan)[edit]

The 2004 tournament was held in Bangladesh. More than 350,000 spectators saw the 54 matches played in the tournament. The finale ended with a close final between the two best teams – West Indies and Pakistan. It was won by Pakistan by 25 runs against West Indies and a 30,000 crowd acclaimed the victorious Pakistanis almost as their own. The players, from the ten Test countries and six other nations, were feted wherever they went, and the appetite for cricket was remarkable: even Zimbabwe v Canada sold out. The shock was the elimination from the main competition of holders Australia, bowled out for 73 and beaten by Zimbabwe in the group stage when Tinashe Panyangara took 6 for 31, the second-best figures in the competition’s history. And Australia then lost to Bangladesh in the plate final amid thumping drums and gleeful celebrations. The downside was the quality of the cricket, which was often mediocre on some indifferent pitches, and the reporting of six unidentified bowlers for having suspect actions. Pakistan would have finished unbeaten but for a hiccup against England – when both teams had already qualified for the semis. England reached the last four, which was progress, and Alastair Cook looked a class apart. But they came unstuck against West Indies’ spinners in the semi-final. India completed the semi-finalists. Dhawan and Suresh Raina were the backbone of a strong batting line-up, and Raina’s 90 from just 38 balls against the hapless Scots was as brutal an innings as one will see at any level. Both looked international-class already, though faced with a tough task breaking into their senior side’s formidable top order. The captain Ambati Rayudu had been hailed as the next great batting hope, having scored a century and a double in a first-class match at the age of 17. But he did not score the runs promised and was banned by the referee John Morrison from the semi-final after allowing a funereal over-rate during the Super League win against Sri Lanka: eight overs were bowled in the first 50 minutes. India’s Shikhar Dhawan was named Man of the Tournament, and was the tournament’s leading run-scorer, with 505 runs at an average of 84.16. Bangladeshi Enamul Haque was the leading wicket-taker, with 22 wickets at 10.18.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 16 teams were: 1.Pakistan, 2.West Indies, 3.India, 4.England, 5.Sri Lanka, 6.Zimbabwe, 7.South Africa, 8.New Zealand, 9.Bangladesh, 10.Australia, 11.Ireland, 12.Scotland, 13.Nepal, 14.Uganda, 15.Canada, 16.Papua New Guinea

2006 (Winner: Pakistan)[edit]

This tournament was always going to struggle to live up to the overwhelming response that greeted the previous event in Bangladesh. Despite free tickets the matches were sparsely attended even when the home side were in action, but it shouldn’t detract from an impressive two weeks which finished with Pakistan securing their second consecutive title in an extraordinary final against India at the Premadasa Stadium. Pakistan crumbled to 109, but in a thrilling passage of play reduced India to 9 for 6. Jamshed Ahmed and Anwar Ali, two of the success stories of the tournament, did the damage and there was no way back for India who fell 38 runs short. These two teams and Australia were the pick of the sides and along with England – who surpassed expectation to reach the semi-finals after beating a talented Bangladesh side – made up the final four. A number of players caught the eye, notably Australia captain Moises Henriques, the Indian batsmen Sumit thakur – the tournament’s leading run-scorer – and team-mate Rohit Sharma, along with legspinner Piyush Chawla, who a few weeks later made his Test debut against England. However, perhaps the best story of the tournament was Nepal claiming the Plate trophy after a thrilling victory against New Zealand having also beaten South Africa during the event.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 16 teams were: 1.Pakistan, 2.India, 3.Australia, 4.England, 5.Bangladesh, 6.Sri Lanka, 7.Zimbabwe, 8.West Indies, 9.Nepal, 10.New Zealand, 11.South Africa, 12.USA, 13.Ireland, 14.Uganda, 15.Namibia, 16.Scotland

2008 (Winner: India)[edit]

It was the first time the tournament was held in an Associate Member country. The 2008 Under-19 Cricket World Cup was held in Malaysia from 17 February to 2 March 2008. Along with hosts, 15 other teams battled in 44 matches packed into 15 days across three cities. India, still smarting from the loss in the previous edition had reason to be upbeat with Tanmay Srivastava, a mature batsman who eventually finished as the tournament’s leading run-getter, in their ranks. Australia and England had forgettable campaigns, coming up short against the big teams after making mincemeat of the minnows. Defending champions Pakistan were fortuitous to reach the semi-finals as their batsmen never really got going and, against South Africa in the semi-finals, their luck finally ran out while chasing 261. New Zealand, boosted by Man of the Tournament Tim Southee, were impressive before losing to India in a narrow run-chase under lights and cloudy skies in the other semi-final. South Africa’s captain Wayne Parnell had played a major role in ensuring their passage to the summit clash, picking up the most wickets in the tournament en route. But they had lost to India in the group stages and lightning did strike twice. India under the leadership of Virat Kohli, after being bowled out for 159, emerged triumphant by 12 runs under the D/L method and were crowned champions for the second time.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 16 teams were: 1.India, 2.South Africa, 3.Pakistan, 4.New Zealand, 5.England, 6.Australia, 7.Sri Lanka, 8.Bangladesh, 9.West Indies, 10.Nepal, 11.Namibia, 12.Papua New Guinea, 13.Ireland, 14.Zimbabwe, 15.Bermuda, 16.Malaysia [1]

2010 (Winner: Australia)[edit]

The 2010 Under-19 Cricket World Cup was held in New Zealand in January 2010. The tournament was hosted in New Zealand after the ICC took it away from Kenya on the flimsiest of reasons which ridiculed its own mission to spread the game. Kenya were further kicked by the ICC as their side was not allowed to participate as it had not won the African qualifying event – a weakened side had been fielded as at the time, as hosts, they did not need to qualify. As it was, New Zealand did a decent job but crowds were dismal and the group stages were as tediously predictable as in the senior tournament, with the better-funded big nations dominating. South Africa did beat Australia in a good match but a dead rubber. The competition came alive in the quarter-finals as West Indies beat England and Sri Lanka defeated South Africa. The best tie of the competition came when Pakistan beat fierce rivals India by two wickets with three balls remaining in a low-scoring match. The final between Australia and Pakistan was a rematch of the first tournament, and Australia won by 25 runs in a game where fortunes ebbed and flowed throughout.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 16 teams were: 1.Australia, 2.Pakistan, 3.West Indies, 4.Sri Lanka, 5.South Africa, 6.India, 7.New Zealand, 8.England, 9.Bangladesh, 10.Ireland, 11.Canada, 12.Papua New Guinea, 13.Zimbabwe, 14.Hong Kong, 15.USA, 16.Afghanistan

2012 (Winner: India)[edit]

2012 Under-19 Cricket World Cup was held in Tony Ireland Stadium, Australia. Along with the 10 ten test playing nations, Afghanistan, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Ireland, Scotland and Namibia also participated in this tournament. Australia lost against India in the final on 26 August 2012. India’s third U19 World Cup means they tie for the most with Australia. Sri Lanka could not go through into the last eight but won the Plate championship by defeating Afghanistan by 7 wickets. Reece Topley of England was the highest wicket taker whereas Anamul Haque of Banglasdesh was the top run getter. India won the final against Australia with 14 balls to spare and 6 wickets remaining. Captain Unmukt Chand played a match winning innings of 111* not out in 130 balls with the help of 6 sixes & 7 fours. Sandeep Sharma also excelled with four wickets under his belt.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 16 teams were: 1.India, 2.Australia, 3.South Africa, 4.New Zealand, 5.England, 6.West Indies, 7.Bangladesh, 8.Pakistan, 9.Sri Lanka, 10.Afghanistan, 11.Scotland, 12.Ireland, 13.Nepal, 14.Papua New Guinea, 15.Zimbabwe, 16.Namibia

2014 (Winner: South Africa)[edit]

2014 Under-19 Cricket World-Cup was held in Dubai(U.A.E) in 2014. It was the first time that U.A.E hosted an ICC event. Afghanistan was the only non-full member to qualify for the Quarter Finals. This was the first time that Afghanistan reached the last eight of this tournament, courtesy of their stellar performance against Australia in the group stage. In fact, this was the second time that a non-test playing nation qualified for the Super League/ Quarter Finals, Nepal being the first one in the 2000 edition. India wobbled in the Quarter Finals against England and finally lost in the final over. This was the first semi-final berth for England in last four editions. Pakistan beat England in the semis to reach its fifth Under-19 Final, becoming the first team to do so. South Africa beat Australia in the second semi-final. In a one-sided final, South Africa beat Pakistans and claimed its maiden U-19 World Cup title. Corbin Bosch, son of former South African cricketer Tertius Bosch, was the Man of the Match in the finals and Aiden Markram was the Man of the Series. South Africa did not lose even a single match in the entire tournament.

The final ranks in the tournament for the 16 teams were: 1.South Africa, 2.Pakistan, 3.England, 4.Australia, 5.India, 6.West Indies, 7.Afghanistan, 8.Sri Lanka, 9.Bangladesh, 10.New Zealand, 11.Zimbabwe, 12.UAE, 13.Namibia, 14.Scotland, 15.Canada, 16.Papua New Guinea

Results[edit]

Year Venue Winner Runners up Semi Finalist 1 (3rd Place) Semi Finalist 2 (4th Place) Plate Champions†
1988  Australia  Australia  Pakistan  West Indies  England Not Played
1998  South Africa  England  New Zealand  South Africa  Australia  Bangladesh
2000  Sri Lanka  India  Sri Lanka  Pakistan  Australia  South Africa
2002  New Zealand  Australia  South Africa  India  West Indies  Zimbabwe
2004  Bangladesh  Pakistan  West Indies  India  England  Bangladesh
2006  Sri Lanka  Pakistan  India  Australia  England    Nepal
2008  Malaysia  India  South Africa  Pakistan  New Zealand  West Indies
2010  New Zealand  Australia  Pakistan  West Indies  Sri Lanka  Bangladesh
2012  Australia  India  Australia  South Africa  New Zealand  Sri Lanka
2014  United Arab Emirates  South Africa  Pakistan  England  Australia  Bangladesh
2016  Bangladesh
2018  New Zealand
2020  South Africa

† The Plate Championship is played among teams not qualified for the second round and is treated as play-off for 9th position as 8 nations advance to the second round of the main tournament.

♦ Officially, no semi finals were played in this tournament. These teams were the 3rd and the 4th ranked teams in the Super League.

Team Australia
1988
South Africa
1998
Sri Lanka
2000
New Zealand
2002
Bangladesh
2004
Sri Lanka
2006
Malaysia
2008
New Zealand
2010
Australia
2012
United Arab Emirates
2014
Bangladesh
2016
New Zealand
2018
South Africa
2020
Total
 Afghanistan 16th 10th 7th Q 3
 Australia 1st 4th 4th 1st 10th 3rd 6th 1st 2nd 4th Q Q Q 10
 Bangladesh 9th 10th 11th 9th 5th 8th 9th 7th 9th Q Q Q 9
 Bermuda 15th 1
 Canada 15th 15th 11th 15th 4
 Denmark 13th 1
 England 4th 1st 6th 7th 4th 4th 5th 8th 5th 3rd Q Q Q 10
 Fiji Q 1
 Hong Kong 14th 1
 ICC Americas 16th 1
 ICC Associates 8th 1
 India 6th 5th 1st 3rd 3rd 2nd 1st 6th 1st 5th Q Q Q 10
 Ireland 14th 12th 11th 13th 10th 12th 6
 Kenya 11th 13th 14th 3
 Malaysia 16th 1
 Namibia 15th 15th 12th 15th 11th 16th 13th Q 7
 Netherlands 14th 1
   Nepal 8th 10th 13th 9th 10th 13th 6
 New Zealand 7th 2nd 7th 6th 8th 10th 4th 7th 4th 10th Q Q Q 10
 Pakistan 2nd 7th 3rd 5th 1st 1st 3rd 2nd 8th 2nd Q Q Q 10
 Papua New Guinea 16th 16th 16th 12th 12th 14th 16th 7
 South Africa * 3rd 9th 2nd 7th 11th 2nd 5th 3rd 1st Q Q Q 9
 Scotland 12th 13th 12th 16th 11th 14th 6
 Sri Lanka 5th 6th 2nd 8th 5th 6th 7th 4th 9th 8th Q Q Q 10
 Uganda 14th 14th 2
 United Arab Emirates 12th 1
 United States 12th 15th 2
 West Indies 3rd 10th 5th 4th 2nd 8th 9th 3rd 6th 6th Q Q Q 10
 Zimbabwe 8th 11th 9th 6th 7th 14th 13th 15th 11th Q Q Q 9

Women’s Cricket World Cup

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup
Administrator International Cricket Council
Format Women’s ODI
First tournament 1973, England
Last tournament 2013, India
Current champion  Australia (6th title)
Most successful  Australia (6 titles)
Most runs Debbie Hockley (1,501)
Most wickets Lyn Fullston (39)
2013 Women’s Cricket World Cup

The ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup is the premier international championship of women’s One Day International cricket. The event is organised by the sport’s governing body, the International Cricket Council(ICC). It was originally administered by the International Women’s Cricket Council until the two associations merged in 2005. The first tournament washeld in England in 1973, two years before the first men’s tournament.

Participation in the tournament has varied through the eight competitions: fifteen different teams have played, but only Australia, England and New Zealand have appeared in every tournament. India have appeared in all but two of the competitions. Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago and Young Englandhave all appeared in just one tournament: in each case, the first competition, in 1973.

The most recent tournament, the 2013 Women’s Cricket World Cup, was held in India for the third time in February. In the final Australia beat West Indies by 114 runs at the Brabourne Stadium.

History[edit]

First World Cup[edit]

Women’s international cricket was first played in 1934, when a party from England toured Australia and New Zealand. The first Test match was played on 28–31 December 1934, and was won by England.[1] The first Test against New Zealand followed early the following year. These three nations remained the only Test playing teams in women’s cricket until 1960, when South Africa played a number of matches against England.[1] Limited overs cricket was first played by first-classteams in England in 1962.[2] Nine years later, the first international one day match was played in men’s cricket, whenEngland took on Australia at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.[3]

Talks began in 1971 about holding a World Cup for women’s cricket, led by Jack Hayward.[4] South Africa, under pressure from the world for their apartheid laws, were not invited to take part in the competition.[5] Both of the other two Test playing nations, Australia and New Zealand were invited. Hayward had previously organised tours of the West Indies by England women, and it was from this region that the other two competing nations were drawn; Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago. To make up the numbers, England also fielded a “Young England” team, and an “International XI” was also included.[4] Five South Africans were invited to play for the International XI as a means of compensation for the team not being invited, but these invitations were later withdrawn.[5]

The inaugural tournament was held at a variety of venues across England in June and July 1973,[6] two years before the first men’s Cricket World Cup was played.[7] The competition was played as a round-robin tournament, and the last scheduled match was England against Australia. Australia went into the game leading the table by a solitary point: they had won four matches and had one abandoned. England had also won four matches, but they had lost to New Zealand.[6][8] As a result, the match also served as a de facto final for the competition. England won the match, held at Edgbaston, Birmingham by 92 runs to win the tournament.[9]

Tournament history[edit]

List of finals[edit]

Key to list of finals
dagger The final was played as a day/night game.
double-dagger The final was decided by the Duckworth–Lewis method.
  • The “Year” column refers to the year the World Cup was held, and links to the article about that tournament.
  • The links in the “Result” column point to the article about that tournament’s final game.
  • Links in the “Winners” and “Runners-up” columns point to the articles for the national cricket teams of the countries, not the articles for the countries.
  • There were no finals in 1973 and 1978 with the top team in the round robin competition being declared winners.
List of finals, along with the host nation and location and result of the final
Year Winner Result Runner-up Final venue Host nation(s)
1982[10]  Australia
152/7 (59 overs)
Australia won by 3 wickets  England
151/5 (60 overs)
Lancaster Park, Christchurch New Zealand
1988[11]  Australia
129/2 (44.5 overs)
Australia won by 3 wickets  England
127/7 (60 overs)
Melbourne Cricket Ground,Melbourne Australia
1993[12]  England
195/5 (60 overs)
England won by 67 runs  New Zealand
128 (55.1 overs)
Lord’s, London England
1997[13]  Australia
165/5 (47.4 overs)
Australia won by 5 wickets  New Zealand
164 (49.3 overs)
Eden Gardens, Kolkata India
2000[14]  New Zealand
184 (48.4 overs)
New Zealand won by 4 runs  Australia
180 (49.1 overs)
Bert Sutcliffe Oval, Lincoln New Zealand
2005[15]  Australia
215/4 (50 overs)
Australia won by 98 runs  India
117 (46 overs)
SuperSport Park, Centurion South Africa
2009  England
167/6 (46.1 overs)
England won by 4 wickets  New Zealand
166 (47.2 overs)
North Sydney Oval, Sydney Australia
2013  Australia
259/7 (50 overs)
Australia won by 114 runs  West Indies
145 (43.1 overs)
Brabourne Stadium, Mumbai India
2017 England
2021 New Zealand

Participation[edit]

Karen Rolton won the title twice as part of the Australian team.

Team 1973 1978 1982 1988 1993 1997 2000 2005 2009 2013
 Australia 2nd 1st 1st 1st 3rd 1st 2nd 1st 4th 1st
 Denmark 8th 1R
 England 1st 2nd 2nd 2nd 1st SF 5th SF 1st 3rd*
 India 4th 4th 4th SF SF 2nd 3rd* 7th
United Nations International XI 4th 5th
 Ireland 4th 5th QF 7th 8th
 Jamaica 6th
 Netherlands 5th 7th QF 8th
 New Zealand 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd* 2nd 2nd 1st SF 2nd 4th
 Pakistan 1R 6th 8th
 South Africa QF SF 6th 7th 6th
 Sri Lanka QF 6th 7th 8th 5th
 Trinidad and Tobago 5th
England Young England 7th
 West Indies 6th 1R 5th 5th 2nd

Note: * indicates only when there was a match exclusively played for the 3rd spot

Records[edit]

World Cup records
Batting
Most runs Debbie Hockley  New Zealand 1,501 1982–2000 [16]
Highest average (min. 10 innings) Karen Rolton  Australia 74.92 1997–2009 [17]
Highest score Belinda Clark  Australia 229 not out 1997 [18]
Highest partnership Haidee Tiffen & Suzie Bates  New Zealand 262 2009 [19]
Most runs in a tournament Debbie Hockley  New Zealand 456 1997 [20]
Bowling
Most wickets Lyn Fullston  Australia 39 1982–1988 [21]
Lowest average (min. 500 balls bowled) Katrina Keenan  New Zealand 9.72 1997–2000 [22]
Best bowling figures Jackie Lord  New Zealand 6/10 1982 [23]
Most wickets in a tournament Lyn Fullston  Australia 23 1982 [24]
Fielding
Most dismissals (wicket-keeper) Jane Smit  England 40 1993–2005 [25]
Most catches (fielder) Janette Brittin  England 19 1982–1997 [26]
Team
Highest score  Australia (v Denmark) 412/3 1997 [27]
Lowest score  Pakistan (v Australia) 27 1997 [28]
Highest win %  Australia 87.16 [29]

References