United Nations General Assembly resolution ES-10/L.22

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
UN General Assembly
Resolution ES‑10/L.22
United Nations General Assembly resolution A ES 10 L 22 vote.png

  Voted in favor
  Voted against
  Abstained
  Not present
Date 21 December 2017
Meeting no. 10th Emergency Special Session (continuation)
Code A/RES/ES‑10/L.22 (Document)
Subject Status of Jerusalem
Voting summary
128 voted for
9 voted against
35 abstained
21 absent
Result Recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital as “null and void”

United Nations General Assembly resolution ES‑10/L.22 is a emergency session resolution declaring the status of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital as “null and void.”.[1] It was adopted by the 37th Plenary meeting of the tenth emergency special session of the United Nations General Assembly[2] during the tenure of the seventy-second session of the United Nations General Assembly on 21 December 2017. The draft resolution was drafted by Yemen and Turkey.[3]Though strongly contested by the United States, it passed by 128 votes to nine against with 21 absentees and 35 abstentions.

Background[edit]

On 6 December 2017, US President Donald Trump said that he would recognise the status of Jerusalem as being Israel’s sovereign capital[4] in a departure from previous UNGA resolutions as well prevailing international norms where no state either recognises Jerusalem as a national capital nor has an embassy there. The move prompted protests from states and communities in many parts of the world.[5]

Following the failure of an United Nations Security Council resolution three days earlier, after an U.S. veto, to rescind the recognition by any states of Jerusalem as a national capital, Palestinian UN Ambassador Riyad Mansour said that the General Assembly would vote on a draft resolution calling for Trump’s declaration to be withdrawn. He sought to invoke Resolution 377, known as the “Uniting for Peace” resolution, to circumvent a veto. The resolution states that the General Assembly can call an Emergency Special Session to consider a matter “with a view to making appropriate recommendations to members for collective measures” if the Security Council fails to act.[6]

Campaign[edit]

On 20 December, US President Donald Trump threatened to cut US aid to countries voting against the US’ side.[7] The day before the vote, he said: “Let them vote against us…We don’t care…this isn’t like it used to be where they could vote against you and then you pay them hundreds of millions of dollars. We’re not going to be taken advantage of any longer.”[8]Ambassador Nikki Haley warned her country would remember and “take names” of every country that voted in favour of the resolution.[9][10][11][12] The governments of Turkey and Iran denounced USA’s threats as “anti-democratic” and “blackmail“.[13][14] She had sent to a letter to dozens of member states that warned Trump had asked her to “report back on those countries who voted against us.”[15] Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan warned Trump that “he cannot buy Turkey’s democratic will with petty dollars” and “that opposition of other countries will teach the United States a good lesson”.[16][17]

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stated that Israel rejects this vote before it passes and called the UN “house of lies”.[18]

Canada’s, which was seeking re-negotiations of the NAFTA, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland‘s spokesman confirmed its intention to abstain from the vote and that the resolution should not have come to the General Assembly.[19]

Content[edit]

The text of the resolution includes the following key statements:[20]

The General Assembly,

  • Bearing in mind the specific status of the Holy City of Jerusalem and, in particular, the need for the protection and preservation of the unique spiritual, religious and cultural dimensions of the City, as foreseen in the relevant United Nations resolutions,
  • Stressing that Jerusalem is a final status issue to be resolved through negotiations in line with relevant United Nations resolutions,
  • Expressing in this regard its deep regret at recent decisions concerning the status of Jerusalem,
  • Affirms that any decisions and actions which purport to have altered, the character, status or demographic composition of the Holy City of Jerusalem have no legal effect, are null and void and must be rescinded in compliance with relevant resolutions of the Security Council, and in this regard, calls upon all States to refrain from the establishment of diplomatic missions in the Holy City of Jerusalem, pursuant to resolution 478 (1980) of the Security Council;
  • Demands that all States comply with Security Council resolutions regarding the Holy City of Jerusalem, and not to recognize any actions or measures contrary to those resolutions;
  • Reiterates its call for the reversal of the negative trends on the ground that are imperiling the two-State solution and for the intensification and acceleration of international and regional efforts and support aimed at achieving, without delay, a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East on the basis of the relevant United Nations resolutions, the Madrid terms of reference, including the principle of land for peace, the Arab Peace Initiative and the Quartet Roadmap and an end to the Israeli occupation that began in 1967.

It concluded in reading that “any decisions and actions, which purport to have altered the character, status or demographic composition of the Holy City of Jerusalem have no legal effect, are null and void and must be rescinded in compliance with relevant resolutions of the Security Council.”[21]

Motion[edit]

The motion was proposed by Yemen and Turkey.[22]

Debate[edit]

In introducing the resolution as Chair of the Arab Group, Yemen’s Amabassador said the US decision was a “blatant violation of the rights of the Palestinian people, as well as those of all Christians and Muslims.” He emphasized that it constituted a “dangerous breach of the Charter of the United Nations and a serious threat to international peace and security, while also undermining the chances for a two‑State solution and fuelling the fires of violence and extremism.”[23]

Turkey, who was the co-sponsor of the draft resolution, also spoke as current Chair of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation(OIC).[23] Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said that Trump’s decision was an outrageous assault to all universal values. “The Palestinians have the right to their own state based on 1967 borders with East Jerusalem as its capital. This is the main parameter and only hope for a just and lasting peace in the region. However, the recent decision of a UN Member State to recognise Jerusalem, or Al-Quds, as the capital of Israel, violates international law, including all relevant UN resolutions.”[22]

The General Assembly heard from Palestinian Foreign Minister Riad Al‑Malki, who said that the meeting was “not because of any animosity to the United States of America” but instead the sessions was “called to make the voice of the vast majority of the international community — and that of people around the world — heard on the question of Jerusalem/Al‑Quds Al‑Sharif.” He called the US decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and to move its embassy there “an aggressive and dangerous move” which could inflame tensions and lead to a religious war that “has no boundaries.” He added that though the decision would have no impact on the city’s status, it would nevertheless compromise the role of the United States in the Middle East peace process.[23] He urged member states to reject “blackmail and intimidation.”[5]

US Ambassador Nikki Haley then said that her country was “singled out for attack” because of its recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. She added that: “The United States will remember this day in which it was singled out for attack in the General Assembly for the very act of exercising our right as a sovereign nation,” Haley said. We will remember it when we are called upon to once again make the world’s largest contribution to the United Nations, and so many countries come calling on us, as they so often do, to pay even more and to use our influence for their benefit.”[15] She added that: “America will put our embassy in Jerusalem. That is what the American people want us to do, and it is the right thing to do. No vote in the United Nations will make any difference on that…this vote will make a difference in how Americans view the UN.”[22]

Israel’s Ambassador Danny Danon then told the assembly that the vowed that “no General Assembly resolution will ever drive us from Jerusalem.”[4]

Venezuela’s Ambassador, speaking for the Non‑Aligned Movement (NAM), expressed “grave concern about Israel’s ongoing violations in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including attempts to alter the character, status and demographic composition of the City of Jerusalem. [It was] slso concerned about the decision to relocate the United States embassy [and] warned that such provocative actions would further heighten tensions, with potentially far‑reaching repercussions given the extremely volatile backdrop.[23]

Other speakers included, Pakistan, Indonesia, Maldives, Syria, Bangladesh, Cuba, Iran and China.[23]

Malaysia’s Ambassador Datuk Seri Mohammed Shahrul Ikram Yaakob said that, as a member of the OIC and NAM, “Malaysia joins the international community in expressing our deep concern and rejects the decision by the United States to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. It is also an infringement of the Palestinian people’s rights and their right to self determination.” He called for a peaceful two-state solution and that Malaysia is concerned the situation will only feed into the agenda of extremists.”[2]

Other speakers included, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and South Africa. The Permanent Observer for the Holy See, Tomasz Grysa, emphasised that Jerusalem was most sacred to the Abrahamic faiths and a symbol for millions of believers around the world who considered it their “spiritual capital.” Its significance went “beyond the question of borders, a reality that should be considered a priority in every negotiation for a political solution.” The Holy See, he said, called for a “peaceful resolution that would ensure respect for the sacred nature of Jerusalem and its universal value…reiterating that only international guarantee could preserve its unique character and status and provide assurance of dialogue and reconciliation for peace in the region.”[23]

After the motion was passed, more speeches continued with Estonia, who also spoke on behalf of other states. Australia’s Ambassador then explained her country’s government did “not support unilateral action that undermined the peace process [and] it did not believe today’s text would help to bring the parties back to the negotiating table.”[23]

Other speakers included, Paraguay, whose Ambassador said that the country would abstain because “the question of Jerusalem was a matter for the Security Council, as the primary body responsible for the maintenance of international peace and security.”[23] This was followed by El Salvador, Argentina and Romania.[23]

Canada’s Ambassador Marc-Andre Blanchard called the proposal “one-sided”[23] and said: “We are disappointed that this resolution is one sided and does not advance prospects for peace to which we aspire, which is why we have abstained on today’s vote.” He, however, added that Canada wanted to emphasise Jerusalem’s special significance to the Abrahamic religions of Jews, Muslims and Christians. “Denying the connection between Jerusalem and the Jewish, Muslim and Christian faiths undermines the integrity of the site for all. We also reiterate the need to maintain the status quo at Jerusalem’s Holy sites.[19]

Nicaragua’s explained its support of the resolution, as it “rebuffed recent unilateral attempts to modify the character and status of Jerusalem. Such unilateral actions were in blatant violation of resolution 2234 (2016) and others…unilateral actions jeopardised peace and stability in the Middle East and drew the international community further away from a solution.”[23]

Mexico’s Ambassador then explained the abstention and emphasised that convening an emergency session was a disproportionate response. “The United States must become part of the solution, not a stumbling block that would hamper progress…the international community was further than ever from agreement.”[23]

The Czech Republic then said that while it supported the European Union position, it had abstained because it “did not believe the draft resolution would contribute to the peace process.”[23]

Armenia said that is position “remained unchanged. The situation should be resolved through negotiations paving the way for lasting peace and security.”[23]

Hungary echoed Armenia’s stance and said it would not comment on the foreign relations of the United States.[23]

Latvia then spoke, before Estonia re-took the floor to say it had also spoken on behalf of Albania, Lithuania and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.[23]

Result[edit]

Vote[24] Quantity States
Approve 128 Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cape Verde, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Republic of the Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Ivory Coast, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Monaco, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zimbabwe.
Reject 9 Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, Togo, United States.
Abstain 35 Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cameroon, Canada, Colombia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Haiti, Hungary, Jamaica, Kiribati, Latvia, Lesotho, Malawi, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Rwanda, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu.
Absent 21 Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, East Timor, El Salvador, Georgia, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Mongolia, Myanmar, Moldova, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, São Tomé and Príncipe, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Zambia.

Reactions[edit]

States

Israel – Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu rejected the result shortly after it was announced in call it “preposterous,” while he also thanked the states that supported “the truth” by not participating in “the theatre of the absurd.” He added that: “Jerusalem is our capital. Always was, always will be…But I do appreciate the fact that a growing number of countries refused to participate in this theatre of the absurd. So I appreciate that, and especially I want to again express our thanks to [US] President (Donald) Trump and Ambassador [Nikki] Haley, for their stalwart defence of Israel and their stalwart defence of the truth.” Defence Minister Avigdor Liberman, reminded Israelis of the longstanding Israeli disdain for such votes. “Let us just remember that this is the same UN about which our first ambassador to the organisation, Abba Eban, once said: ‘If Algeria introduced a resolution declaring that the earth was flat and that Israel had flattened it, it would pass by a vote of 164 to 13 with 26 abstentions’. There is nothing new in what just happened at the UN.” He also praised the US as “the moral beacon shining out of the darkness.” Minister of Strategic Affairs and Public Security Gilad Erdan said: “The historic connection between Israel and Jerusalem is stronger than any vote by the ‘United Nations’ — nations who are united only by their fear and their refusal to recognise the simple truth that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel and the Jewish people.”

    • However, opposition Joint List Chairman and MK Ayman Odeh called the vote a wake-up call for Israel: “In the international arena, there still exists a large and definitive majority that believes that the Palestinian people, like all other nations, deserve a place in this world and the right to self-determination. This evening’s vote by the majority of the world’s nations against Trump’s announcement, in spite of the pressure and threats, flies in the face of Trump’s and Netanyahu’s diplomatic policy and is a clear statement by the international community in support of peace and the right of the Palestinians to an independent state, whose capital is East Jerusalem,”[8]
Media

Haaretz‘s Noa Landau, wrote, in citing unnamed diplomatic sourced, that Israel was particularly disappointed with countries like India that have enhanced bilateral relations with it recently. “The main disappointment in Israel was with the countries that have enhanced bilateral relations in recent years, especially those that share a particularly conservative worldview with the Netanyahu government. For example, India – whose Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, visited Israel in July, a tour that was memorable mainly for the pastoral photographs of him and Netanyahu embracing and wading in the waves – voted for the resolution against Israel and the United States.”[8]

Others

At a “Solidarity to Save Jerusalem” rally organised by the Barisan National government in Malaysia, one of the attendees Association of NextGen Christians of Malaysia President Joshua Hong said at the Putra Mosque: “We are here because we feel that the decision made by President Trump on announcing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel is merely a political decision. He added that the decision also hurts Christian and Arabic churches in Palestine and not just the Muslims. “To us as Christians, Jerusalem is a city of peace and after that announcement, we feel there is no more peace.I think it is not right and unjust. We believe we should continue pursuing the sustainable peace solution for Palestine and Israel, rather than just a single nation declaring it just like that.” He claimed that about 50 members of the group turned up in a show of support for the Palestinian people..[2]

Badminton at the 2016 Summer Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Badminton
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Badminton, Rio 2016.png
Venue Riocentro – Pavilion 4
Dates 11–20 August
Competitors 172
«2012 2020»

The badminton tournaments at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro took place from 11 to 20 August at the fourth pavilion ofRiocentro. A total of 172 athletes competed in five events: men’s singles,men’s doubles, women’s singles, women’s doubles, and mixed doubles.[1]

Similar to 2012 format, a combination of group play and knockout stages had been maintained at these Games. In all the doubles tournaments, theBadminton World Federation instituted several changes to the competition rules after the match fixing scandal from the previous Olympics, as all pairs finishing second in their groups would be placed into another draw to determine who they face in the next round, while the top pair in each group must have a fixed position matched to its designated seed in the knockout phase.[2]

The Games made use of about 8,400 shuttlecocks.[3]

Qualification[edit]

The Olympic qualification period took place between May 4, 2015 and May 1, 2016, and the Badminton World Federationrankings list, scheduled to publish on May 5, 2016, was used to allocate spots.[4] Unlike the previous Games, nations could only enter a maximum of two players each in the men’s and women’s singles, if both were ranked in the world’s top 16; otherwise, one quota place until the roster of thirty-eight players had been completed. Similar regulations in the singles tournaments also applied to the players competing in the doubles, as the NOCs could only enter a maximum of two pairs if both were ranked in the top eight, while the remaining NOCs were entitled to one until the quota of 16 highest-ranked pairs was filled.[5]

For each player who had qualified in more than one discipline, an additional quota place in each of the singles tournaments would have became free. If no player from one continent had qualify, the best ranked player from a respective continent would have got a quota place.[4]

Schedule[edit]

P Preliminaries R Round of 16 ¼ Quarterfinals ½ Semifinals F Final
Date → Thu 11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14 Mon 15 Tues 16 Wed 17 Thu 18 Fri 19 Sat 20
Event ↓ M A E M A E M A E M A E M E M E M E M E M E M E
Men’s singles P R ¼ ½ F
Men’s doubles P ¼ ½ F F
Women’s singles P R ¼ ½ F
Women’s doubles P ¼ ½ F
Mixed doubles P ¼ ½ F

M = Morning session, A = Afternoon session, E = Evening session

Participation[edit]

Participating nations[edit]

List of badminton players at the 2016 Summer Olympics

NOC Name Age Event and World Ranking (21 July 2016)
MS WS MD WD XD
 Australia Matthew Chau 9 November 1994 (age 23) 36
 Australia Robin Middleton 8 February 1985 (age 33) 28
 Australia Sawan Serasinghe 21 February 1994 (age 23) 36
 Australia Chen Hsuan-yu 1 June 1993 (age 24) 72
 Australia Leanne Choo 5 June 1991 (age 26) 28
 Austria David Obernosterer 30 May 1989 (age 28) 69
 Austria Elisabeth Baldauf 3 August 1990 (age 27) 75
 Belgium Yuhan Tan 21 April 1987 (age 30) 51
 Belgium Lianne Tan 20 November 1990 (age 27) 62
 Brazil Ygor Coelho de Oliveira 24 November 1996 (age 21) 64
 Brazil Lohaynny Vicente 2 May 1996 (age 21) 66
 Brunei Jaspar Yu Woon 14 November 1988 (age 29) 413
 Bulgaria Gabriela Stoeva 15 July 1994 (age 23) 16
 Bulgaria Stefani Stoeva 23 September 1995 (age 22) 16
 Bulgaria Linda Zechiri 27 July 1987 (age 30) 31
 Canada Martin Giuffre 5 October 1990 (age 27) 76
 Canada Michelle Li 3 November 1991 (age 26) 19
 China Chai Biao 10 October 1990 (age 27) 5
 China Chen Long 18 January 1989 (age 29) 2
 China Fu Haifeng 2 January 1984 (age 34) 4
 China Hong Wei 4 October 1989 (age 28) 5
 China Lin Dan 14 October 1983 (age 34) 3
 China Xu Chen 29 November 1984 (age 33) 6
 China Zhang Nan 1 March 1990 (age 27) 4 1
 China Li Xuerui 24 January 1991 (age 27) 3
 China Luo Ying 11 January 1991 (age 27) 7
 China Luo Yu 11 January 1991 (age 27) 7
 China Ma Jin 7 May 1988 (age 29) 6
 China Tang Yuanting 2 August 1994 (age 23) 2
 China Wang Yihan 18 January 1988 (age 30) 2
 China Yu Yang 7 April 1986 (age 31) 2
 China Zhao Yunlei 25 August 1986 (age 31) 1
 Chinese Taipei Chou Tien-chen 8 January 1990 (age 28) 7
 Chinese Taipei Lee Sheng-mu 3 October 1986 (age 31) 20
 Chinese Taipei Tsai Chia-hsin 25 July 1982 (age 35) 20
 Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 20 June 1994 (age 23) 8
 Cuba Osleni Guerrero 18 October 1989 (age 28) 60
 Czech Republic Petr Koukal 14 December 1985 (age 32) 83
 Czech Republic Kristína Gavnholt 12 September 1988 (age 29) 36
 Denmark Viktor Axelsen 4 June 1994 (age 23) 4
 Denmark Mathias Boe 11 July 1980 (age 37) 6
 Denmark Joachim Fischer Nielsen 23 November 1978 (age 39) 4
 Denmark Jan Østergaard Jørgensen 31 December 1987 (age 30) 5
 Denmark Carsten Mogensen 24 July 1983 (age 34) 6
 Denmark Line Kjærsfeldt 20 April 1994 (age 23) 24
 Denmark Christinna Pedersen 12 May 1986 (age 31) 6 4
 Denmark Kamilla Rytter Juhl 23 November 1983 (age 34) 6
 Estonia Raul Must 9 November 1987 (age 30) 40
 Estonia Kati Tolmoff 3 December 1983 (age 34) 71
 Finland Nanna Vainio 29 May 1991 (age 26) 63
 France Brice Leverdez 9 April 1986 (age 31) 39
 France Delphine Lansac 18 July 1995 (age 22) 51
 Great Britain Chris Adcock 27 April 1989 (age 28) 7
 Great Britain Marcus Ellis 14 September 1989 (age 28) 22
 Great Britain Chris Langridge 2 May 1985 (age 32) 22
 Great Britain Rajiv Ouseph 30 August 1986 (age 31) 15
 Great Britain Gabrielle Adcock 30 September 1990 (age 27) 7
 Great Britain Kirsty Gilmour 21 September 1993 (age 24) 15
 Great Britain Heather Olver 15 March 1986 (age 31) 25
 Great Britain Lauren Smith 26 September 1991 (age 26) 25
 Germany Michael Fuchs 22 April 1982 (age 35) 27 18
 Germany Johannes Schöttler 27 August 1984 (age 33) 27
 Germany Marc Zwiebler 13 March 1984 (age 33) 14
 Germany Johanna Goliszewski 9 May 1986 (age 31) 24
 Germany Birgit Michels 28 September 1984 (age 33) 18
 Germany Carla Nelte 21 September 1990 (age 27) 24
 Germany Karin Schnaase 14 February 1985 (age 33) 28
 Guatemala Kevin Cordón 28 November 1986 (age 31) 44
 Hong Kong Hu Yun 31 August 1981 (age 36) 12
 Hong Kong Lee Chun Hei 25 January 1994 (age 24) 16
 Hong Kong Ng Ka Long
24 June 1994 (age 23) 13
 Hong Kong Chau Hoi Wah 5 June 1986 (age 31) 16
 Hong Kong Poon Lok Yan 22 August 1991 (age 26) 31
 Hong Kong Tse Ying Suet 9 November 1991 (age 26) 31
 Hong Kong Yip Pui Yin 6 August 1987 (age 30) 34
 Hungary Laura Sárosi 11 November 1992 (age 25) 68
 India Manu Attri 31 December 1992 (age 25) 21
 India Srikanth Kidambi 7 February 1993 (age 25) 11
 India B. Sumeeth Reddy 26 September 1991 (age 26) 21
 India Jwala Gutta 7 September 1983 (age 34) 21
 India Saina Nehwal 17 March 1990 (age 27) 5
 India Ponnappa, AshwiniAshwini Ponnappa 18 September 1989 (age 28) 21
 India Sindhu, PusarlaPusarla Sindhu 5 July 1995 (age 22) 10
 Indonesia Ahmad, TontowiTontowi Ahmad 18 July 1987 (age 30) 3
 Indonesia Ahsan, MohammadMohammad Ahsan 7 September 1987 (age 30) 2
 Indonesia Jordan, PraveenPraveen Jordan 26 April 1993 (age 24) 5
 Indonesia Setiawan, HendraHendra Setiawan 25 August 1984 (age 33) 2
 Indonesia Sugiarto, TommyTommy Sugiarto 31 May 1988 (age 29) 8
 Indonesia Fanetri, LindaweniLindaweni Fanetri 18 January 1990 (age 28) 25
 Indonesia Maheswari, Nitya KrishindaNitya Krishinda Maheswari 16 December 1988 (age 29) 4
 Indonesia Natsir, LilyanaLilyana Natsir 9 September 1985 (age 32) 3
 Indonesia Polii, GreysiaGreysia Polii 11 August 1987 (age 30) 4
 Indonesia Susanto, DebbyDebby Susanto 3 May 1989 (age 28) 5
 Ireland Evans, ScottScott Evans 26 September 1987 (age 30) 74
 Ireland Magee, ChloeChloe Magee 29 November 1988 (age 29) 58
 Israel Zilberman, MishaMisha Zilberman 30 January 1989 (age 29) 52
 Italy Cicognini, JeanineJeanine Cicognini 14 November 1986 (age 31) 61
 Japan Endo, HiroyukiHiroyuki Endo 16 December 1986 (age 31) 8
 Japan Hayakawa, KenichiKenichi Hayakawa 5 April 1986 (age 31) 8
 Japan Kazuno, KentaKenta Kazuno 25 November 1985 (age 32) 15
 Japan Sasaki, ShoSho Sasaki 30 June 1982 (age 35) 25
 Japan Kurihara, AyaneAyane Kurihara 27 September 1989 (age 28) 15
 Japan Matsutomo, MisakiMisaki Matsutomo 8 February 1992 (age 26) 1
 Japan Okuhara, NozomiNozomi Okuhara 13 March 1995 (age 22) 6
 Japan Takahashi, AyakaAyaka Takahashi 19 April 1990 (age 27) 1
 Japan Yamaguchi, AkaneAkane Yamaguchi 6 June 1997 (age 20) 12
 Malaysia Peng Soon, ChanChan Peng Soon 27 April 1988 (age 29) 10
 Malaysia V Shem, GohGoh V Shem 20 May 1989 (age 28) 12
 Malaysia Chong Wei, LeeLee Chong Wei 21 October 1982 (age 35) 1
 Malaysia Wee Kiong, TanTan Wee Kiong 21 May 1989 (age 28) 12
 Malaysia Liu Ying, GohGoh Liu Ying 30 May 1989 (age 28) 10
 Malaysia Hoo Kah Mun, VivianVivian Hoo Kah Mun 19 March 1990 (age 27) 15
 Malaysia Jing Yi, TeeTee Jing Yi 8 February 1991 (age 27) 29
 Malaysia Khe Wei, WoonWoon Khe Wei 18 March 1989 (age 28) 15
 Mexico Muñoz, LinoLino Muñoz 8 February 1991 (age 27) 73
 Mauritius Foo Kune, KateKate Foo Kune 29 March 1993 (age 24) 69
 Netherlands Arends, JaccoJacco Arends 28 January 1991 (age 27) 17
 Netherlands Muskens, EefjeEefje Muskens 17 June 1989 (age 28) 11
 Netherlands Piek, SelenaSelena Piek 30 September 1991 (age 26) 11 17
 Poland Cwalina, AdamAdam Cwalina 26 January 1985 (age 33) 25
 Poland Dziółko, AdrianAdrian Dziółko 22 February 1990 (age 27) 53
 Poland Mateusiak, RobertRobert Mateusiak 13 January 1976 (age 42) 13
 Poland Wacha, PrzemysławPrzemysław Wacha 31 January 1981 (age 37) 25
 Poland Zięba, NadieżdaNadieżda Zięba 21 May 1984 (age 33) 13
 Portugal Martins, PedroPedro Martins 14 February 1990 (age 28) 63
 Portugal Santos, TelmaTelma Santos 1 August 1983 (age 34) 67
 South Africa Maliekal, JacobJacob Maliekal 1 January 1991 (age 27) 78
 Russia Ivanov, VladimirVladimir Ivanov 3 July 1987 (age 30) 13
 Russia Malkov, VladimirVladimir Malkov 9 April 1986 (age 31) 61
 Russia Sozonov, IvanIvan Sozonov 6 July 1989 (age 28) 13
 Russia Perminova, NataliaNatalia Perminova 14 November 1991 (age 26) 55
 Singapore Wong Zi Liang, DerekDerek Wong Zi Liang 13 January 1989 (age 29) 57
 Singapore Xiaoyu, LiangLiang Xiaoyu 11 January 1996 (age 22) 30
 South Korea Gi-jung, KimKim Gi-jung 14 August 1990 (age 27) 3
 South Korea Sa-rang, KimKim Sa-rang 22 August 1989 (age 28) 3
 South Korea Sung-hyun, KoKo Sung-hyun 21 May 1987 (age 30) 2
 South Korea Dong-keun, LeeLee Dong-keun 20 November 1990 (age 27) 16
 South Korea Yong-dae, LeeLee Yong-dae 11 September 1988 (age 29) 1
 South Korea Wan-ho, SonSon Wan-ho 17 May 1988 (age 29) 9
 South Korea Yeon-seong, YooYoo Yeon-seong 19 August 1986 (age 31) 1
 South Korea Yeon-ju, BaeBae Yeon-ju 26 October 1990 (age 27) 17
 South Korea Ye-na, ChangChang Ye-na 13 December 1989 (age 28) 9
 South Korea Kyung-eun, JungJung Kyung-eun 20 March 1990 (age 27) 5
 South Korea Ha-na, KimKim Ha-na 27 December 1989 (age 28) 2
 South Korea So-hee, LeeLee So-hee 14 June 1994 (age 23) 9
 South Korea Seung-chan, ShinShin Seung-chan 6 December 1994 (age 23) 5
 South Korea Ji-hyun, SungSung Ji-hyun 29 July 1991 (age 26) 7
 Spain Abian, PabloPablo Abian 12 June 1985 (age 32) 43
 Spain Marin, CarolinaCarolina Marin 15 June 1993 (age 24) 1
 Sri Lanka Karunaratne, NilukaNiluka Karunaratne 13 February 1985 (age 33) 95
 Switzerland Jaquet, SabrinaSabrina Jaquet 21 June 1987 (age 30) 82
 Suriname Opti, SorenSoren Opti 16 May 1997 (age 20) 326
 Sweden Hurskainen, HenriHenri Hurskainen 13 September 1986 (age 31) 50
 Thailand Issara, BodinBodin Issara 12 December 1990 (age 27) 14
 Thailand Ponsana, BoonsakBoonsak Ponsana 22 February 1982 (age 35) 32
 Thailand Amitrapai, SavitreeSavitree Amitrapai 19 November 1988 (age 29) 14
 Thailand Buranaprasertsuk, PorntipPorntip Buranaprasertsuk 24 October 1991 (age 26) 16
 Thailand Intanon, RatchanokRatchanok Intanon 5 February 1995 (age 23) 4
 Thailand Supajirakul, PuttitaPuttita Supajirakul 29 March 1996 (age 21) 17
 Thailand Taerattanachai, SapsireeSapsiree Taerattanachai 18 April 1992 (age 25) 17
 Turkey Bayrak, ÖzgeÖzge Bayrak 14 February 1992 (age 26) 52
 Ukraine Pochtarev, ArtemArtem Pochtarev 24 July 1993 (age 24) 75
 Ukraine Ulitina, MarijaMarija Ulitina 5 November 1991 (age 26) 64
 United States Chew, PhillipPhillip Chew 16 May 1994 (age 23) 35 27
 United States Pongnairat, SattawatSattawat Pongnairat 8 May 1990 (age 27) 35
 United States Shu, HowardHoward Shu 28 November 1990 (age 27) 62
 United States Lee, EvaEva Lee 7 August 1986 (age 31) 26
 United States Obanana, Paula LynnPaula Lynn Obanana 19 March 1985 (age 32) 26
 United States Subandhi, JamieJamie Subandhi 15 February 1989 (age 29) 27
 United States Wang, IrisIris Wang 2 September 1994 (age 23) 35
 Vietnam Tiến Minh, NguyễnNguyễn Tiến Minh 12 February 1983 (age 35) 33
 Vietnam Thị Trang, VũVũ Thị Trang 19 May 1992 (age 25) 44

This is the list of the Badminton players who participated at the 2016 Summer Olympicsin Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 11–20 August 2016.

Medal summary

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 China 2 0 1 3
2 Indonesia 1 0 0 1
Japan 1 0 1 2
Spain 1 0 0 1
5 Malaysia 0 3 0 3
6 Denmark 0 1 1 2
7 India 0 1 0 1
8 Great Britain 0 0 1 1
South Korea 0 0 1 1
Total 5 5 5 15

Medalists[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men’s singles
details
Chen Long
 China
Lee Chong Wei
 Malaysia
Viktor Axelsen
 Denmark
Men’s doubles
details
 China (CHN)
Fu Haifeng
Zhang Nan
 Malaysia (MAS)
Goh V Shem
Tan Wee Kiong
 Great Britain (GBR)
Chris Langridge
Marcus Ellis
Women’s singles
details
Carolina Marin
 Spain
P.V. Sindhu
 India
Nozomi Okuhara
 Japan
Women’s doubles
details
 Japan (JPN)
Misaki Matsutomo
Ayaka Takahashi
 Denmark (DEN)
Christinna Pedersen
Kamilla Rytter Juhl
 South Korea (KOR)
Jung Kyung-eun
Shin Seung-chan
Mixed doubles
details
 Indonesia (INA)
Tontowi Ahmad
Liliyana Natsir
 Malaysia (MAS)
Chan Peng Soon
Goh Liu Ying
 China (CHN)
Zhang Nan
Zhao Yunlei

Results[edit]

Men’s singles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Lee Chong Wei (MAS) 21 21
C1   Chou Tien-chen (TPE) 9 15
A1   Lee Chong Wei (MAS) 15 21 22
E1   Lin Dan (CHN) 21 11 20
E1   Lin Dan (CHN) 21 11 21
H1   Srikanth Kidambi (IND) 6 21 18
A1   Lee Chong Wei (MAS) 18 18
P1   Chen Long (CHN) 21 21
I1   Rajiv Ouseph (GBR) 12 16
L1   Viktor Axelsen (DEN) 21 21
L1   Viktor Axelsen (DEN) 14 15
P1   Chen Long (CHN) 21 21 Bronze Medal Match
N1   Son Wan-ho (KOR) 11 21 11
P1   Chen Long (CHN) 21 18 21 E1   Lin Dan (CHN) 21 10 17
L1   Viktor Axelsen (DEN) 15 21 21

Women’s singles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Carolina Marín (ESP) 21 21
C1   Sung Ji-hyun (KOR) 12 16
A1   Carolina Marín (ESP) 21 21
E1   Li Xuerui (CHN) 14 16
E1   Li Xuerui (CHN) 21 21
H1   Porntip Buranaprasertsuk (THA) 12 17
A1   Carolina Marín (ESP) 19 21 21
M1   P. V. Sindhu (IND) 21 12 15
J1   Nozomi Okuhara (JPN) 11 21 21
K1   Akane Yamaguchi (JPN) 21 17 10
J1   Nozomi Okuhara (JPN) 19 10
M1   P. V. Sindhu (IND) 21 21 Bronze Medal Match
M1   P. V. Sindhu (IND) 22 21
P1   Wang Yihan (CHN) 20 19 E1   Li Xuerui (CHN) w / o
J1   Nozomi Okuhara (JPN)

Men’s doubles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Vladimir Ivanov (RUS)
 Ivan Sozonov (RUS)
13 21 16
D2   Chai Biao (CHN)
 Hong Wei (CHN)
21 16 21
D2   Chai Biao (CHN)
 Hong Wei (CHN)
18 21 17
B1   Goh V Shem (MAS)
 Tan Wee Kiong (MAS)
21 12 21
B1   Goh V Shem (MAS)
 Tan Wee Kiong (MAS)
17 21 21
A2   Lee Yong-dae (KOR)
 Yoo Yeon-seong (KOR)
21 18 19
B1   Goh V Shem (MAS)
 Tan Wee Kiong (MAS)
21 11 21
B2   Fu Haifeng (CHN)
 Zhang Nan (CHN)
16 21 23
B2   Fu Haifeng (CHN)
 Zhang Nan (CHN)
11 21 24
C1   Kim Gi-jung (KOR)
 Kim Sa-rang (KOR)
21 18 22
B2   Fu Haifeng (CHN)
 Zhang Nan (CHN)
21 21
C2   Marcus Ellis (GBR)
 Chris Langridge (GBR)
14 18 Bronze Medal Match
C2   Marcus Ellis (GBR)
 Chris Langridge (GBR)
21 21
D1   Hiroyuki Endo (JPN)
 Kenichi Hayakawa (JPN)
19 17 D2   Chai Biao (CHN)
 Hong Wei (CHN)
18 21 10
C2   Chris Langridge (GBR)
 Marcus Ellis (GBR)
21 19 21

Women’s doubles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Misaki Matsutomo (JPN)
 Ayaka Takahashi (JPN)
21 18 21
C2   Vivian Hoo Kah Mun (MAS)
 Woon Khe Wei (MAS)
16 21 9
A1   Misaki Matsutomo (JPN)
 Ayaka Takahashi (JPN)
21 21
B1   Jung Kyung-eun (KOR)
 Shin Seung-chan (KOR)
16 15
B1   Jung Kyung-eun (KOR)
 Shin Seung-chan (KOR)
21 20 21
A2   Eefje Muskens (NED)
 Selena Piek (NED)
13 22 14
A1   Misaki Matsutomo (JPN)
 Ayaka Takahashi (JPN)
18 21 21
B2   Christinna Pedersen (DEN)
 Kamilla Rytter Juhl (DEN)
21 9 19
D2   Tang Yuanting (CHN)
 Yu Yang (CHN)
21 21
C1   Nitya Krishinda Maheswari (INA)
 Greysia Polii (INA)
11 14
D2   Tang Yuanting (CHN)
 Yu Yang (CHN)
16 21 19
B2   Christinna Pedersen (DEN)
 Kamilla Rytter Juhl (DEN)
21 14 21 Bronze Medal Match
B2   Christinna Pedersen (DEN)
 Kamilla Rytter Juhl (DEN)
28 18 21
D1   Chang Ye-na (KOR)
 Lee So-hee (KOR)
26 21 15 B1   Jung Kyung-eun (KOR)
 Shin Seung-chan (KOR)
21 21
D2   Tang Yuanting (CHN)
 Yu Yang (CHN)
8 17

Mixed doubles[edit]

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
A1   Zhang Nan (CHN)
 Zhao Yunlei (CHN)
21 21
D2   Kenta Kazuno (JPN)
 Ayane Kurihara (JPN)
14 12
A1   Zhang Nan (CHN)
 Zhao Yunlei (CHN)
16 15
C1   Tontowi Ahmad (INA)
 Liliyana Natsir (INA)
21 21
C1   Tontowi Ahmad (INA)
 Liliyana Natsir (INA)
21 21
A2   Praveen Jordan (INA)
 Debby Susanto (INA)
16 11
C1   Tontowi Ahmad (INA)
 Liliyana Natsir (INA)
21 21
C2   Chan Peng Soon (MAS)
 Goh Liu Ying (MAS)
14 12
C2   Chan Peng Soon (MAS)
 Goh Liu Ying (MAS)
21 21
B1   Robert Mateusiak (POL)
 Nadiezda Zieba (POL)
17 10
C2   Chan Peng Soon (MAS)
 Goh Liu Ying (MAS)
21 21
B2   Xu Chen (CHN)
 Ma Jin (CHN)
12 19 Bronze Medal Match
B2   Xu Chen (CHN)
 Ma Jin (CHN)
21 21
D1   Ko Sung-hyun (KOR)
 Kim Ha-na (KOR)
17 18 A1   Zhang Nan (CHN)
 Zhao Yunlei (CHN)
21 21
B2   Xu Chen (CHN)
 Ma Jin (CHN)
7 11

Archery at the 2016 Summer Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Archery
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Archery, Rio 2016.png
Venue Sambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí
Dates 6–12 August
Competitors 128
«2012 2020»

The archery events at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeirowere held over a seven-day period from 6 to 12 August. Four events took place, all were staged at the Sambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí.

Competition format[edit]

A total of 128 athletes competed across the four events: the men’s individual, women’s individual, men’s team and women’s team.[1]

All four events were recurve archery events, held under the World Archery-approved 70-meter distance and rules. The competition started with an initial ranking round involving all 64 archers of each gender. Each archer would shoot a total of 72 arrows to be seeded from 1–64 according to their score.

The ranking round was also used to seed the teams from 1 to 12, by aggregating the individual scores for the members of each team.

Each event was played in a single-elimination tournament format, except for the semi-final losers, who would play off to decide the bronze medal winner.

Individual events[edit]

In the individual events, all 64 competitors entered the competition at the first round, the round of 64. The draw was seeded according to the result of the ranking round so the first seed shot against the 64th seed in the first round.

Each match was scored using the Archery Olympic Round, consisting of the best-of-five sets, with three arrows per set. The winner of each set received two points, and if the scores in the set had tied then each archer would have received one point. If at the end of five sets the score had been tied at 5–5, a single arrow shoot-off would have held and the closest to the center would be declared the winner.

Team events[edit]

In the team events, the top four seeded teams from the ranking round will receive a bye to the quarter-final. The remaining eight teams, seeded 5th to 12th, will compete for the remaining four places in the quarter-finals.

For the first time, the team event has followed the same Archery Olympic Round set system as the individual event.

Schedule[edit]

All times are Brasília Time (UTC−3).

Day Date Start Finish Event Phase
Day 0 Friday 5 August 2016 Men’s individual Ranking round
Women’s individual Ranking round
Day 1 Saturday 6 August 2016 9:00 17:45 Men’s team Eliminations/Medal round
Day 2 Sunday 7 August 2016 9:00 17:45 Women’s team Eliminations/Medal round
Day 3 Monday 8 August 2016 9:00 17:45 Men’s individual 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Women’s individual 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Day 4 Tuesday 9 August 2016 9:00 17:45 Men’s individual 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Women’s individual 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Day 5 Wednesday 10 August 2016 9:00 18:55 Men’s individual 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Women’s individual 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Day 6 Thursday 11 August 2016 9:00 17:10 Women’s individual 1/8 Eliminations/Quarter/Semi finals/Medal round
Day 7 Friday 12 August 2016 9:00 17:10 Men’s individual 1/8 Eliminations/Quarter/Semi finals/Medal round

Qualification[edit]

Each National Olympic Committee (NOC) was permitted to enter a maximum of six competitors, three per gender. NOCs that qualified teams for a particular gender were able to send a three-member team to the team event and also have each member compete in the individual event. There were 12 team spots for each gender, thus qualifying 36 individuals through team qualification. All other NOCs might earn a maximum of one quota place per gender for the individual events.[2]

Six places were reserved for Brazil as the host nation, and a further six were decided by the Tripartite Commission. The remaining 116 places were then allocated through a qualification process, in which archers earned quota places for their respective NOCs, though not necessarily for themselves.

To be eligible to participate in the Olympic Games after the NOC has obtained a quota place, all archers must have achieved the following minimum qualification score (MQS):

  • Men: 70m round of 630
  • Women: 70m round of 600

The MQS must have been achieved between 26 July 2015 (starting at the 2015 World Archery Championships) and 11 July 2016 at a registered World Archery event.

Participating nations[edit]

Archers from 56 nations participated at the 2016 Summer Olympics.

Competitors[edit]

Male archers

  • Entry list at 1 August 2016[1]
NOC Name Age Hometown World ranking Team ranking
 Australia Alec Potts February 9, 1996 (age 22) AustraliaSouth Australia Clayton Bay 108 19
 Australia Ryan Tyack June 2, 1991 (age 26) AustraliaQueensland Brisbane 59 19
 Australia Taylor Worth January 8, 1991 (age 27) AustraliaWestern Australia Yangebup 15 19
 Belarus Anton Prilepov February 5, 1984 (age 34) Belarus Mogilev 18
 Belgium Robin Ramaekers October 26, 1994 (age 23) Belgium Tongeren 97
 Brazil Marcus Dalmeida January 30, 1998 (age 20) BrazilRio de Janeiro (state) Rio de Janeiro 17 17
 Brazil Bernardo Oliveira June 8, 1993 (age 24) BrazilFederal District (Brazil) Brasilia 99 17
 Brazil Daniel Rezende Xavier August 31, 1982 (age 35) BrazilMinas Gerais Belo Horizonte 114 17
 Canada Crispin Duenas January 5, 1986 (age 32) CanadaOntario Toronto 20
 Chile Ricardo Soto October 20, 1999 (age 18) Chile Arica 113
 China Gu Xuesong June 21, 1993 (age 24) China Shanghai 39 3
 China Wang Dapeng December 3, 1996 (age 21) China Huangdao 118 3
 China Xing Yu March 12, 1991 (age 26) China Beijing 12 3
 Chinese Taipei Kao Hao-wen March 17, 1995 (age 22) Chinese Taipei Hualien 31 6
 Chinese Taipei Wei Chun-heng July 6, 1994 (age 23) Chinese Taipei Taoyuan 10 6
 Chinese Taipei Yu Guan-lin November 29, 1993 (age 24) Chinese Taipei Nantou 55 6
 Colombia Andres Pila May 11, 1991 (age 26) Colombia Montelíbano 82
 Cuba Adrian Andres Puentes Perez July 3, 1988 (age 29) Cuba Sancti Spíritus 123
 Egypt Ahmed El-Nemr November 21, 1978 (age 39) Egypt Cairo 156
 Fiji Robert Elder April 25, 1981 (age 36) Fiji Suva 199
 Finland Samuli Piippo January 1, 1980 (age 38) Finland Oulu 75
 France Lucas Daniel January 1, 1995 (age 23) France Riom 25 15
 France Pierre Plihon October 29, 1989 (age 28) France Nice 42 15
 France Jean-Charles Valladont March 20, 1989 (age 28) France Champigny-sur-Marne 4 15
 Germany Florian Floto April 12, 1988 (age 29) GermanyLower SaxonyBraunschweig 77
 Great Britain Patrick Huston January 5, 1996 (age 22) United KingdomNorthern Ireland Belfast 38
 India Atanu Das April 5, 1992 (age 25) India Kolkata 22
 Indonesia Riau Ega Agatha November 25, 1991 (age 26) Indonesia Blitar 29 14
 Indonesia Hendra Purnama November 12, 1997 (age 20) Indonesia Bantul 98 14
 Indonesia Muhammad Wijaya November 22, 1996 (age 21) Indonesia Jambi 209 14
 Italy Marco Galiazzo May 9, 1983 (age 34) Italy Padua 381 5
 Italy Mauro Nespoli November 22, 1987 (age 30) Italy Vigna di Valle 11 5
 Italy David Pasqualucci June 27, 1996 (age 21) Italy Genzano di Roma 28 5
 France Rene Philippe Kouassi December 14, 1979 (age 38) France Angers 279
 Japan Takaharu Furukawa August 9, 1984 (age 33) Japan Aomori 19
 Kazakhstan Sultan Duzelbayev March 12, 1994 (age 23) Kazakhstan Almaty 125
 Libya Ali Elghari January 31, 1997 (age 21) Libya Tripoli 440
 Malawi Areneo David June 6, 1995 (age 22) Malawi Gumulira 440
 Malaysia Haziq Kamaruddin July 21, 1993 (age 24) Malaysia Kuala Lumpur 100 18
 Malaysia Khairul Anuar Mohamad September 22, 1991 (age 26) Malaysia Kemaman 41 18
 Malaysia Muhammad Akmal Nor Hasrin July 15, 1995 (age 22) Malaysia Kuala Lumpur 235 18
 Mexico Ernesto Boardman February 23, 1993 (age 24) MexicoCoahuila Arteaga 16
 Mongolia Gantugs Jantsan April 12, 1972 (age 45) Mongolia Ulaanbaatar 114
 Nepal Jitbahadur Muktan August 31, 1979 (age 38) Nepal Kathmandu 338
 Netherlands Mitch Dielemans January 6, 1993 (age 25) Netherlands Geldrop 51 7
 Netherlands Sjef van den Berg April 14, 1995 (age 22) Netherlands Oss 5 7
 Netherlands Rick van der Ven April 14, 1991 (age 26) Netherlands Arnhem 7 7
 Norway Baard Nesteng May 14, 1979 (age 38) Norway Fredrikstad 52
 Slovakia Boris Balaz November 20, 1997 (age 20) Slovakia Liptovský Mikuláš 202
 South Korea Kim Woo-jin June 20, 1992 (age 25) South Korea Chungju 1 1
 South Korea Ku Bon-chan January 31, 1993 (age 25) South Korea Andong 2 1
 South Korea Lee Seung-yun April 18, 1995 (age 22) South Korea Seoul 8 1
 Spain Miguel Alvarino Garcia May 31, 1994 (age 23) SpainGalicia (Spain) A Coruña 9 9
 Spain Antonio Fernandez June 12, 1991 (age 26) SpainExtremadura Cáceres 23 9
 Spain Juan Rodriguez Liebana June 19, 1992 (age 25) SpainCommunity of Madrid Madrid 30 9
 Thailand Witthaya Thamwong September 19, 1987 (age 30) Thailand Lampang 101
 Tonga Hans Arne Jensen February 25, 1998 (age 19) Tonga Nuku’alofa 869
 Turkey Mete Gazoz June 8, 1999 (age 18) Turkey Istanbul 14
 Ukraine Viktor Ruban May 24, 1981 (age 36) Ukraine Kharkiv 36
 United States Brady Ellison October 27, 1988 (age 29) United StatesArizona Globe 6 2
 United States Zach Garrett April 8, 1995 (age 22) United StatesMissouri Wellington 3 2
 United States Jake Kaminski August 11, 1988 (age 29) United StatesNew York (state) Elma 26 2
 Venezuela Elias Malave October 26, 1989 (age 28) Venezuela Maturín 35
 Great Britain Gavin Ben Sutherland June 26, 1979 (age 38) United Kingdom Worthing 177

Female archers[edit]

  • Entry list at 1 August 2016[2]
NOC Name Age Hometown World ranking Team ranking
 Australia Alice Ingley January 13, 1993 (age 25) AustraliaWestern Australia Perth 353
 Austria Laurence Baldauff November 19, 1974 (age 43) Austria Vienna 93
 Azerbaijan Olga Senyuk January 23, 1991 (age 27) Azerbaijan Baku 83
 Bangladesh Shamoli Ray April 5, 1994 (age 23) Bangladesh Dhaka 175
 Bhutan Karma Karma June 6, 1990 (age 27) Bhutan Trashiyangtse 229
 Brazil Marina Canetta April 1, 1989 (age 28) BrazilSão Paulo (state) São Paulo 105 20
 Brazil Ane Marcelle dos Santos January 12, 1994 (age 24) BrazilRio de Janeiro (state) Maricá 64 20
 Brazil Sarah Nikitin December 27, 1988 (age 29) BrazilSão Paulo (state) São Paulo 126 20
 Canada Georcy Thiffeault Picard February 8, 1991 (age 27) CanadaQuebec Montreal 46
 China Cao Hui September 7, 1991 (age 26) China Liaoning 34 6
 China Qi Yuhong August 25, 1989 (age 28) China Shanghai 21 6
 China Wu Jiaxin February 28, 1997 (age 20) China Shanghai 20 6
 Chinese Taipei Le Chien-ying April 17, 1990 (age 27) Chinese Taipei Taipei 7 4
 Chinese Taipei Lin Shih-chia May 20, 1993 (age 24) Chinese Taipei Hsinchu 10 4
 Chinese Taipei Tan Ya-ting November 7, 1993 (age 24) Chinese Taipei Hsinchu 2 4
 Colombia Carolina Aguirre January 29, 1996 (age 22) Colombia Antioquia 79 13
 Colombia Ana Maria Rendon March 10, 1986 (age 31) Colombia Medellín 27 13
 Colombia Natalia Sanchez March 20, 1983 (age 34) Colombia Medellín 36 13
 Dominican Republic Yessica Camilo Gonzalez April 23, 1993 (age 24) Dominican Republic Santo Domingo 157
 Egypt Reem Mansour December 20, 1993 (age 24) Egypt Cairo 179
 Estonia Laura Nurmsalu June 1, 1994 (age 23) Estonia Viljandi 75
 Finland Taru Kuoppa November 14, 1983 (age 34) Finland Lahti 96
 Georgia Kristine Esebua March 19, 1985 (age 32) Georgia (country) Khobi 8 7
 Georgia Yuliya Lobzhenidze August 23, 1977 (age 40) Georgia (country) Tbilisi 85 7
 Georgia Khatuna Narimanidze February 2, 1974 (age 44) Georgia (country) Batumi 37 7
 Germany Lisa Unruh April 12, 1988 (age 29) GermanyBerlin Berlin 16
 Great Britain Naomi Folkard September 18, 1983 (age 34) United KingdomEngland Leamington Spa 67
 Greece Evangelia Psarra June 17, 1974 (age 43) Greece Thessaloniki 95
 India Deepika Kumari June 13, 1994 (age 23) India Jamshedpur 12 4
 India Bombayla Devi Laishram February 22, 1985 (age 32) India Imphal 69 4
 India Laxmirani Majhi January 26, 1989 (age 29) India Chittaranjan 15 4
 Indonesia Ika Rochmawati July 2, 1989 (age 28) Indonesia Bojonegoro 26
 Iran Zahra Nemati April 30, 1985 (age 32) Iran Tehran 47
 Italy Lucilla Boari March 24, 1997 (age 20) Italy Mantua 24 9
 Italy Claudia Mandia October 21, 1992 (age 25) Italy Salerno 74 9
 Italy Guendalina Sartori August 8, 1988 (age 29) Italy Monselice 17 9
 Japan Yuki Hayashi October 2, 1984 (age 33) Japan Kawanishi 33 10
 Japan Kaori Kawanaka August 3, 1991 (age 26) Japan Kotoura 13 10
 Japan Saori Nagamine July 5, 1993 (age 24) Japan Nagasaki 61 10
 Kazakhstan Luiza Saidiyeva March 17, 1994 (age 23) Kazakhstan Shymkent 107
 Kenya Shehzana Anwar August 21, 1989 (age 28) Kenya Nairobi 195
 Mexico Gabriela Bayardo February 18, 1994 (age 23) MexicoBaja California Tijuana 62 12
 Mexico Aida Roman May 21, 1988 (age 29) MexicoMexico City Mexico City 14 12
 Mexico Alejandra Valencia October 17, 1994 (age 23) MexicoSonora Hermosillo 18 12
 Moldova Alexandra Mirca October 11, 1993 (age 24) Moldova Chișinău 60
 Myanmar San Yu Htwe October 14, 1986 (age 31) Myanmar Mindat 191
 North Korea Kang Un-ju February 1, 1995 (age 23) North Korea Pyongyang 72
 Poland Karina Lipiarska-Palka February 16, 1987 (age 30) Poland Gmina Zabierzów 41
 Russia Tuiana Dashidorzhieva April 14, 1996 (age 21) RussiaZabaykalsky Krai Chita 11 2
 Russia Ksenia Perova February 8, 1989 (age 29) RussiaSverdlovsk Oblast Lesnoy 5 2
 Russia Inna Stepanova April 17, 1990 (age 27) RussiaBuryatia Ulan-Ude 48 2
 Slovakia Alexandra Longova February 7, 1994 (age 24) Slovakia Viničné 57
 South Korea Hye Jin Chang May 13, 1987 (age 30) South Korea Daegu 6 1
 South Korea Choi Mi-sun July 1, 1996 (age 21) South Korea Gwangju 1 1
 South Korea Ki Bo-bae February 20, 1988 (age 29) South Korea Gwangju 3 1
 Spain Adriana Martin April 17, 1997 (age 20) SpainCommunity of Madrid Madrid 51
 Sweden Christine Bjerendal February 3, 1987 (age 31) Sweden Lindome 77
 Tonga Karoline Lusitania Tatafu February 20, 1998 (age 19) Tonga Nuku’alofa 309
 Turkey Yasemin Anagoz October 14, 1998 (age 19) Turkey Izmir 31
 Ukraine Veronika Marchenko April 3, 1993 (age 24) Ukraine Lviv 9 8
 Ukraine Anastasia Pavlova February 9, 1995 (age 23) Ukraine Nova Kakhovka 44 8
 Ukraine Lidiia Sichenikova February 3, 1993 (age 25) Ukraine Chernivtsi 45 8
 United States Mackenzie Brown March 14, 1995 (age 22) United StatesTexas Flint 4
 Venezuela Leidys Brito July 5, 1984 (age 33) Venezuela Maturín 55

External links

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 South Korea 4 0 1 5
2 United States 0 1 1 2
3 Germany 0 1 0 1
France 0 1 0 1
Russia 0 1 0 1
6 Australia 0 0 1 1
Chinese Taipei 0 0 1 1
Total 4 4 4 12

Medalists[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men’s individual
details
Ku Bon-chan
 South Korea
Jean-Charles Valladont
 France
Brady Ellison
 United States
Men’s team
details
 South Korea (KOR)
Ku Bon-chan
Lee Seung-yun
Kim Woo-jin
 United States (USA)
Brady Ellison
Zach Garrett
Jake Kaminski
 Australia (AUS)
Alec Potts
Ryan Tyack
Taylor Worth
Women’s individual
details
Chang Hye-jin
 South Korea
Lisa Unruh
 Germany
Ki Bo-bae
 South Korea
Women’s team
details
 South Korea (KOR)
Chang Hye-jin
Choi Mi-sun
Ki Bo-bae
 Russia (RUS)
Tuyana Dashidorzhieva
Ksenia Perova
Inna Stepanova
 Chinese Taipei (TPE)
Le Chien-ying
Lin Shih-chia
Tan Ya-ting

List of Banks owned by the Rothschild Family

“Give me control over a nations currency, and I care not who makes its laws” – Baron M.A. Rothschild

rothcrest

ROTHSCHILD OWNED BANKS:
Afghanistan, Bank of Afghanistan,
Albania, Bank of Albania,
Algeria, Bank of Algeria,
Argentina, Central Bank of Argentina,
Armenia, Central Bank of Armenia,
Aruba, Central Bank of Aruba,
Australia, Reserve Bank of Australia,
Austria, Austrian National Bank,
Azerbaijan, Central Bank of Azerbaijan Republic,
Bahamas, Central Bank of The Bahamas,
Bahrain, Central Bank of Bahrain,
Bangladesh, Bangladesh Bank,
Barbados, Central Bank of Barbados,
Belarus, National Bank of the Republic of Belarus,
Belgium, National Bank of Belgium,
Belize, Central Bank of Belize,
Benin, Central Bank of West African States, (BCEAO),
Bermuda, Bermuda Monetary Authority,
Bhutan, Royal Monetary Authority of Bhutan,
Bolivia, Central Bank of Bolivia,
Bosnia, Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina,
Botswana, Bank of Botswana,
Brazil, Central Bank of Brazil,
Bulgaria, Bulgarian National Bank,
Burkina Faso, Central Bank of West African States, (BCEAO),
Burundi, Bank of the Republic of Burundi,
Cambodia, National Bank of Cambodia,
Came Roon, Bank of Central African States,
Canada, Bank of Canada – Banque du Canada,
Cayman Islands, Cayman Islands Monetary Authority,
Central African Republic, Bank of Central African States,
Chad, Bank of Central African States,
Chile, Central Bank of Chile,

China, The People’s Bank of China,

Colombia, Bank of the Republic,
Comoros, Central Bank of Comoros,
Congo, Bank of Central African States,
Costa Rica, Central Bank of Costa Rica,
Côte d’Ivoire, Central Bank of West African States, (BCEAO),
Croatia, Croatian National Bank,
Cuba, Central Bank of Cuba,
Cyprus, Central Bank of Cyprus,
Czech Republic, Czech National Bank,
Denmark, National Bank of Denmark,
Dominican Republic, Central Bank of the Dominican Republic,
East Caribbean area, Eastern Caribbean Central Bank,
Ecuador, Central Bank of Ecuador,
Egypt, Central Bank of Egypt ,
El Salvador, Central Reserve Bank of El Salvador,
Equatorial Guinea, Bank of Central African States,
Estonia, Bank of Estonia,
Ethiopia, National Bank of Ethiopia,
European Union, European Central Bank,

money-world-

Fiji, Reserve Bank of Fiji,
Finland, Bank of Finland,
France, Bank of France,
Gabon, Bank of Central African States,
The Gambia, Central Bank of The Gambia,
Georgia, National Bank of Georgia,
Germany, Deutsche Bundesbank,
Ghana, Bank of Ghana,
Greece, Bank of Greece,
Guatemala, Bank of Guatemala,

Guinea Bissau, Central Bank of West African States, (BCEAO),
Guyana, Bank of Guyana,
Haiti, Central Bank of Haiti ,
Honduras, Central Bank of Honduras,
Hong Kong, Hong Kong Monetary Authority,
Hungary, Magyar Nemzeti Bank,
Iceland, Central Bank of Iceland,
India, Reserve Bank of India,
Indonesia, Bank Indonesia,
Iran, The Central Bank of the Islamic Republic of Iran,

Iraq, Central Bank of Iraq,

Ireland, Central Bank and Financial Services Authority of Ireland,
Israel, Bank of Israel,
Italy, Bank of Italy,
Jamaica, Bank of Jamaica,
Japan, Bank of Japan,
Jordan, Central Bank of Jordan,
Kazakhstan, National Bank of Kazakhstan,
Kenya, Central Bank of Kenya,
Korea, Bank of Korea,
Kuwait, Central Bank of Kuwait,
Kyrgyzstan, National Bank of the Kyrgyz Republic,
Latvia, Bank of Latvia,
Lebanon, Central Bank of Lebanon,
Lesotho, Central Bank of Lesotho,

Libya, Central Bank of Libya,

us-homeland-security-seal-plaque_m-747261

Uruguay, Central Bank of Uruguay,
Lithuania, Bank of Lithuania,
Luxembourg, Central Bank of Luxembourg,
Macao, Monetary Authority of Macao,
Macedonia, National Bank of the Republic of Macedonia,
Madagascar, Central Bank of Madagascar,
Malawi, Reserve Bank of Malawi,
Malaysia, Central Bank of Malaysia,
Mali, Central Bank of West African States, (BCEAO),
Malta, Central Bank of Malta,
Mauritius, Bank of Mauritius,
Mexico, Bank of Mexico,
Moldova, National Bank of Moldova,
Mongolia, Bank of Mongolia,
Montenegro, Central Bank of Montenegro,
Morocco, Bank of Morocco,
Mozambique, Bank of Mozambique,
Namibia, Bank of Namibia,
Nepal, Central Bank of Nepal,
Netherlands, Netherlands Bank,
Netherlands Antilles, Bank of the Netherlands Antilles,
New Zealand, Reserve Bank of New Zealand,
Nicaragua, Central Bank of Nicaragua,
Niger, Central Bank of West African States, (BCEAO),
Nigeria, Central Bank of Nigeria,
Norway, Central Bank of Norway,
Oman, Central Bank of Oman,
Pakistan, State Bank of Pakistan,
Papua New Guinea, Bank of Papua New Guinea,
Paraguay, Central Bank of Paraguay,
Peru, Central Reserve Bank of Peru,
Philip Pines, Bangko Sentralng Pilipinas,
Poland, National Bank of Poland,
Portugal, Bank of Portugal,
Qatar, Qatar Central Bank,
Romania, National Bank of Romania,
Russia, Central Bank of Russia,

Rwanda, National Bank of Rwanda,
San Marino, Central Bank of the Republic of San Marino,
Samoa, Central Bank of Samoa,
Saudi Arabia, Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency,

Senegal, Central Bank of West African States, (BCEAO),
Serbia, National Bank of Serbia,
Seychelles, Central Bank of Seychelles,
Sierra Leone, Bank of Sierra Leone,
Singapore, Monetary Authority of Singapore,
Slovakia, National Bank of Slovakia,
Slovenia, Bank of Slovenia,
Solomon Islands, Central Bank of Solomon Islands,
South Africa, South African Reserve Bank,
Spain, Bank of Spain,
Sri Lanka, Central Bank of Sri Lanka,
Sudan, Bank of Sudan,
Surinam, Central Bank of Suriname,
Swaziland, The Central Bank of Swaziland,
Sweden, Sveriges Riksbank,
Switzerland, Swiss National Bank,

Tajikistan, National Bank of Tajikistan,
Tanzania, Bank of Tanzania,
Thailand, Bank of Thailand,
Togo, Central Bank of West African States, (BCEAO),
Tonga, National Reserve Bank of Tonga,
Trinidad and Tobago, Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago,
Tunisia, Central Bank of Tunisia,
Turkey, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey,

Uganda, Bank of Uganda,
Ukraine, National Bank of Ukraine,
United Arab Emirates, Central Bank of United Arab Emirates,

United Kingdom, Bank of England,

United States, Federal Reserve, Federal Reserve Bank of New York,

US-FederalReserveSystem-Seal_svg_

Vanuatu, Reserve Bank of Vanuatu,
Venezuela, Central Bank of Venezuela,

Vietnam, The State Bank of Vietnam,
Yemen, Central Bank of Yemen,
Zambia, Bank of Zambia,
Zimbabwe, Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe,
Bank For International Settlements, (BIS),

Felines animals

Jaguar

Leopard

Lion

Tiger

[7.5][islamic group]Islamic State in Iraq & Al Sham

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“ISIL” and “ISIS” redirect here. For other uses, see ISIL (disambiguation) and ISIS (disambiguation).
Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant
الدولة الإسلامية في العراق والشام  (Arabic)
ad-Dawlah al-Islāmīyah fī al-‘Irāq wash-Shām


Primary participant in:


Primary target of: The Global War on Terrorism, the Military interventions against ISIL, theInterventions in Iraq, the Interventions in Syria, and the Interventions in Libya.

Black Standard adopted by ISIL
Flag Emblem
Motto: باقية وتتمدد
Bāqiyah wa-Tatamaddad
“Remaining and Expanding”[1]
Anthem: أمتي قد لاح فجر
Ummatī, qad lāha fajrun
“My Nation, Dawn Has Appeared”[2][3]
Military situation as of 16 February 2015, in Iraq and Syria (minus the Golan Heights).

  Controlled by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant
  Controlled by al-Nusra
  Controlled by other Syrian rebels
  Controlled by Syrian government
  Controlled by Iraqi government
  Controlled by Syrian Kurds
  Controlled by Iraqi Kurds

Note: Syria and Iraq contain large desert areas with limited population. These areas are mapped as under the control of forces holding roads and towns within them.

Map of the current military situation in Iraq
Map of the current military situation in Syria

Administrative center Ar-Raqqah, Syria
(de facto)[4][5]
35°57′N 39°1′E
Largest city Mosul, Iraq
Ideologies Wahhabism[6]
Salafist Jihadism
Salafism[7][8]
Type Rebel group controlling territory

Military strength & operation areas Inside Iraq and Syria
200,000[12] (Kurdish claim)
20,000–31,000 (CIA estimate)
Outside Iraq and Syria
21,000–35,800 (SeeMilitary of ISIL for more-detailed estimates.)
Leaders
 – Leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi[13]
 – Deputy leader in Iraq Abu Muslim al-Turkmani  [14][15]
 – Deputy leader in Syria Abu Ali al-Anbari[15]
 – Head of Military Shura Abu Ayman al-Iraqi[16]
 – Spokesman Abu Muhammad al-Adnani[17][18]
 – Field commander Abu Omar al-Shishani[19]
Establishment
 – Formation (as Jamāʻat al-Tawḥīd wa-al-Jihād) 1999[20]
 – Joined al-Qaeda October 2004
 – Declaration of an Islamic statein Iraq 13 October 2006
 – Claim of territory in the Levant 8 April 2013
 – Separated from al-Qaeda[21][22] 3 February 2014[23]
 – Declaration of “Caliphate 29 June 2014
 – Claim of territory in Libya,Egypt, Algeria, Saudi Arabia,Yemen, Afghanistan andPakistan 13 November 2014

The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL /ˈsəl/) is a jihadistrebel group that controls territory in Iraq and Syria and also operates in eastern Libya, the Sinai Peninsula of Egypt, and other areas of the Middle East,[24] North Africa, South Asia,[25] and Southeast Asia.[25][26]The group’s Arabic name is transliterated as ad-Dawlah al-Islāmīyah fī al-‘Irāq wash-Shām leading to the Arabic acronym Da‘ish or DAESH(Arabic pronunciation: da:ʕeʃ).[27] The name is also commonly translated as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria or Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS /ˈsɪs/).[27] On 29 June 2014, the group proclaimed itself to be a Worldwide Caliphate and renamed itself to theIslamic State (IS), but the new name has been widely criticized and condemned, with the UN, various governments, and mainstream Muslim groups refusing to acknowledge it.[28][29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37]Many Islamic and non-Islamic communities judge the group to be unrepresentative of Islam.[38] Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was named its “caliph“.[39] As caliphate it claims religious, political and military authority over all Muslims worldwide and that “the legality of all emirates, groups, states, and organizations, becomes null by the expansion of the khilāfah’s (caliphates’s) authority and arrival of its troops to their areas”.[40][41]

The United Nations has held ISIL responsible for human rights abuses and war crimes, and Amnesty International has reported ethnic cleansing by the group on a “historic scale”. The group has beendesignated as a terrorist organization by the United Nations, theEuropean Union, the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Canada, Indonesia, Malaysia, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt, India, and Russia. Over 60 countries are directly or indirectly waging war against ISIL.

The group originated as Jama’at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad in 1999, which was renamed Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn—commonly known as al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI)—when the group pledged allegiance to al-Qaeda in 2004. Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, AQI took part in the Iraqi insurgency. In 2006, it joined other Sunni insurgent groups to form the Mujahideen Shura Council, which shortly afterwards proclaimed the formation of an Islamic state, naming it the Islamic State of Iraq (ISI). The ISI gained a significant presence in Al Anbar,Nineveh, Kirkuk and other areas, but around 2008, its violent methods, including suicide attacks on civilian targets and the widespread killing of prisoners, led to a backlash from Sunni Iraqis and other insurgent groups.[a]

The group grew significantly under the leadership of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, and after entering the Syrian Civil War, it established a large presence in Sunni-majority areas of Syria within the governorates of Ar-Raqqah, Idlib, Deir ez-Zor and Aleppo.[42] Having expanded into Syria, the group changed its name in April 2013 to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), when al-Baghdadi announced its merger with the Syrian-based group al-Nusra Front. The group remained closely linked to al-Qaeda until February 2014, when after an eight-month power struggle, al-Qaeda cut all ties with ISIL—citing its failure to consult and “notorious intransigence”.[23][43]

ISIL is known for its well-funded web and social media propaganda, which includes Internet videos of the beheadings of soldiers, civilians, journalists, and aid workers. (See ISIL beheading incidents.)

The group gained notoriety after it drove the Iraqi government forces out of key western cities in Iraq while in Syria it conquered and conducted ground attacks against both the government forces and rebel factions in the Syrian Civil War. It gained those territories after an offensive, initiated in early 2014, which senior U.S. military commanders and members of the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs saw as a reemergence of Sunni insurgents and al-Qaeda militants. This territorial loss implied a failure of U.S. foreign policy and almost caused a collapse of the Iraqi government that required renewal of U.S. action in Iraq.

History

Outline of history – with links to content below

As Jama’at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad (Organization of Monotheism and Jihad)  (1999–2004)
As Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn (al-Qaeda in Iraq)  (2004–2006)
As Mujahideen Shura Council  (2006)
As Islamic State of Iraq  (2006–2013)
As Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant  (2013–2014)
As self-proclaimed “Islamic State  (June 2014–present)

Names

The group has had various names since it was established.[47]

  1. The group was founded in 1999 by Abu Musab al-Zarqawiunder the name Jamāʻat al-Tawḥīd wa-al-Jihād, “The Organization of Monotheism and Jihad” (JTJ).[20]
  2. In October 2004, al-Zarqawi swore loyalty to Osama bin Ladenand changed the group’s name to Tanẓīm Qāʻidat al-Jihād fī Bilād al-Rāfidayn, “The Organization of Jihad’s Base in Mesopotamia“, commonly known as al-Qaeda in Iraq.(AQI).[47][48] Although the group has never called itself al-Qaeda in Iraq, this has been its informal name over the years.[49]
  3. In January 2006, AQI merged with several other Iraqi insurgent groups to form the Mujahideen Shura Council.[50]Al-Zarqawi was killed in June 2006.
  4. On 12 October 2006, the Mujahideen Shura Council merged with several more insurgent factions, and on 13 October the establishment of the Dawlat al-ʻIraq al-Islāmīyah, Islamic State of Iraq (ISI) was announced.[51] The leaders of this group were Abu Abdullah al-Rashid al-Baghdadi and Abu Ayyub al-Masri.[52] After they were killed in a US–Iraqi operation in April 2010, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi became the new leader of the group.
  5. On 8 April 2013, having expanded into Syria, the group adopted the name Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham, which more fully translates as Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant or Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.[53][54][55]These names are translations of the Arabic name al-Dawlah al-Islāmīyah fī al-ʻIrāq wa-al-Shām,[56][57] al-Shām being a description of the Levant or Greater Syria.[27] The translated names are commonly abbreviated as ISIL or ISIS, with a debate over which of these acronyms should be used.[57][27] The Washington Post concluded that the distinction between the two “is not so great”.”[27]
  6. The name Daʿish is often used by ISIL’s Arabic-speaking detractors. It is based on the Arabic letters dāl, alif, ʻayn, and shīn, which form the acronym (داعش) of ISIL’s Arabic name al-Dawlah al-Islamīyah fī al-ʻIrāq wa-al-Shām.[58][59]There are many spellings of this acronym with DAESH gaining acceptance. ISIL considers the name Da’ish derogatory for it sounds similar to the Arabic words Daes, “one who crushes something underfoot,” and Dahes, “one who sows discord.”[60][61]—and reportedly uses flogging as a punishment for those who use the name in ISIL-controlled areas.[62][63]
  7. On 14 May 2014, the United States Department of State announced its decision to use “Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant” (ISIL) as the group’s primary name.[58] However, in late 2014 top US officials shifted toward DAESH citing it was the preferred term used by Arab partners.[60]
  8. On 29 June 2014, the group renamed itself the Islamic State (IS) and declared itself to be a worldwide “caliphate“.[39][64][65] “Accordingly, the “Iraq and Shām” in the name of the Islamic State is henceforth removed from all official deliberations and communications, and the official name is the Islamic State from the date of this declaration.” This name and the idea of a caliphate has been widely criticized, with the UN, various governments, and mainstream Muslim groups refusing to use it.[30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37][66]

Foundation of the group (1999–2006)

A screenshot from the 2004 hostage video, where Nick Berg was beheadedby al-Zarqawi’s group.

Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Jordanian Salafi Jihadist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and his militant group Jama’at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad, founded in 1999, achieved notoriety in the early stages of the Iraq insurgency, by (suicide) attackingShia Islamic mosques and civilians, Iraqi government institutions, and Italiansoldiers partaking in the U.S.-led ‘Multi-National Force‘.

Armed insurgents in Iraq

Al-Zarqawi’s group in October 2004 it officially pledged allegiance to Osama bin Laden‘s al-Qaeda network, changing its name to Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn (تنظيم قاعدة الجهاد في بلاد الرافدين, “Organization of Jihad’s Base inMesopotamia“), also known as Al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI).[21][67][68] Attacks by the group on civilians, Iraqi Government and security forces, foreign diplomats and soldiers, American convoys, continued with roughly the same intensity. In a letter to al-Zarqawi in July 2005, al-Qaeda‘s deputy leader Ayman al-Zawahiri outlined a four-stage plan to expand the Iraq War, which included expelling US forces from Iraq, establishing an Islamic authority, as caliphate, spreading the conflict to Iraq’s secular neighbors, and clash with Israel, which the letter says “was established only to challenge any new Islamic entity”.[69]

In January 2006, AQI merged with several smaller Iraqi insurgent groups under an umbrella organization called the Mujahideen Shura Council (MSC). This was claimed by Brian Fishman in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science to be little more than a media exercise and an attempt to give the group a more Iraqi flavour and perhaps to distance al-Qaeda from some of al-Zarqawi’s tactical errors, notably the 2005 bombings by AQI of three hotels in Amman.[70] On 7 June, al-Zarqawi was killed in a US airstrike and was succeeded as leader of the group by the Egyptian militant Abu Ayyub al-Masri.[71][72]

On 12 October 2006, the Mujahideen Shura Council united with three smaller groups and six Sunni Islamic tribes to form the “Mutayibeen Coalition”, that swore by Allah “…to rid Sunnis from the oppression of the rejectionists (= Shi’ite Muslims) and the crusader occupiers, … to restore rights even at the price of our own lives… to make Allah’s word supreme in the world, and to restore the glory of Islam…”.[73][74]

On 13 October 2006, the Mujahideen Shura Council declared the establishment of the Islamic State of Iraq (ISI), which should comprise Iraq’s six mostly Sunni Arab governorates,[75] with Abu Omar al-Baghdadi being announced as itsEmir.[51][76] Al-Masri was given the title of Minister of War within the ISI’s ten-member cabinet.[77]

A joint US–Iraqi training exercise near Ramadi in November 2009. The Islamic State of Iraq had declared the city to be its capital.

As Islamic State of Iraq (2006–2013)

Main article: Islamic State of Iraq

According to a study compiled by US intelligence agencies in early 2007, the ISI—also known as AQI—planned to seize power in the central and western areas of the country and turn it into a Sunni Islamic state.[78] The group built in strength and at its height enjoyed a significant presence in the Iraqi governorates of Al Anbar,Nineveh,[citation needed] Kirkuk,[citation needed] most of Salah ad Din,[citation needed] parts ofBabil,[citation needed] Diyala and Baghdad, and claimed Baqubah as a capital city.[79][80][81][82]

However, by late 2007, violent and indiscriminate attacks directed by rogue AQI elements against Iraqi civilians had severely damaged the group’s image and caused a loss of support among the population, thus isolating it.[citation needed] In a major blow to AQI, many former Sunni militants who had previously fought alongside the group started to work with the US armed forces.[citation needed] The US troops surge of 2007 supplied the U.S. military with more manpower for operations targeting the group, resulting in dozens of high-level AQI members being captured or killed.[83]

Between July and October 2007, al-Qaeda in Iraq or ISI seemed to have lost their secure military bases in Anbar provinceand the Baghdad area.[84] During 2008, a series of US and Iraqi offensives managed to drive out the AQI-aligned insurgents from their former safe havens, such as the Diyala and Al Anbar governorates, to the area of the northern city ofMosul, the latest major battleground against ISI.[85]
By 2008, the ISI was describing itself as being in a state of “extraordinary crisis”.[86] Its violent attempts to govern its territory led to a backlash[clarification needed] from Sunni Iraqis and other insurgent groups and a temporary decline in the group,[clarification needed] which was attributable to a number of factors,[87] notably the Anbar Awakening.

In late 2009, the commander of the US forces in Iraq, General Ray Odierno, stated that the ISI “has transformed significantly in the last two years. What once was dominated by foreign individuals has now become more and more dominated by Iraqi citizens”.[88] On 18 April 2010, the ISI’s two top leaders, Abu Ayyub al-Masri and Abu Omar al-Baghdadi, were killed in a joint US-Iraqi raid near Tikrit.[89] In a press conference in June 2010, General Odierno reported that 80% of the ISI’s top 42 leaders, including recruiters and financiers, had been killed or captured, with only eight remaining at large. He said that they had been cut off from al-Qaeda’s leadership in Pakistan.[90][91][92]

On 16 May 2010, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was appointed as the new leader of the Islamic State of Iraq.[93][94] Al-Baghdadi replenished the group’s leadership, many of whom had been killed or captured, by appointing former Ba’athist military and intelligence officers who had served during the Saddam Hussein regime. These men, nearly all of whom had spent time imprisoned by the US military, came to make up about one-third of Baghdadi’s top 25 commanders. One of them was a former Colonel, Samir al-Khlifawi, also known as Haji Bakr, who became the overall military commander in charge of overseeing the group’s operations.[95][96]

In July 2012, al-Baghdadi released an audio statement online announcing that the group was returning to the former strongholds from which US troops and their Sunni allies had driven them in 2007 and 2008.[97] He also declared the start of a new offensive in Iraq called Breaking the Walls, aimed at freeing members of the group held in Iraqi prisons.[97] Violence in Iraq had begun to escalate in June 2012, primarily by AQI’s car bomb attacks, and by July 2013, monthly fatalities had exceeded 1,000 for the first time since April 2008.[98]

Syrian Civil War (2011–present)

In March 2011, protests began in Syria against the government of Bashar al-Assad. In the following months, violence between demonstrators and security forces led to a gradual militarisation of the conflict.[99] In August 2011, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi began sending Syrian and Iraqi ISI members experienced in guerilla warfare across the border into Syria in order to establish an organization inside the country. Led by a Syrian known as Abu Muhammad al-Julani, this group began to recruit fighters and establish cells throughout the country.[100][101] On 23 January 2012, the group announced its formation as Jabhat al-Nusra li Ahl as-ShamJabhat al-Nusra—more commonly known as the al-Nusra Front. Al-Nusra grew rapidly into a capable fighting force, with popular support among Syrians opposed to the Assad government.[100]

As Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (2013–2014)

Islamic State fighters in 2014, seen here in Anbar province, with Abu Waheeb in the foreground.

On 8 April 2013, al-Baghdadi released an audio statement in which he announced that the al-Nusra Front had been established, financed, and supported by the Islamic State of Iraq,[102] and that the two groups were merging under the name “Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham”.[53] Al-Jawlani issued a statement denying the merger, and complaining that neither he nor anyone else in al-Nusra’s leadership had been consulted about it.[103] In June 2013, Al Jazeera reported that it had obtained a letter written by al-Qaeda‘s leader Ayman al-Zawahiri, addressed to both leaders, in which he ruled against the merger, and appointed an emissary to oversee relations between them to put an end to tensions.[104] In the same month, al-Baghdadi released an audio message rejecting al-Zawahiri’s ruling and declaring that the merger was going ahead.[105] The ISIL campaign to free imprisoned ISIL members culminated in July 2013, with the group carrying out simultaneous raids on Taji and Abu Ghraib prison, freeing more than 500 prisoners, many of them veterans of the Iraqi insurgency.[98][106]
In October 2013, al-Zawahiri ordered the disbanding of ISIL, putting al-Nusra Front in charge of jihadist efforts in Syria,[107]but al-Baghdadi contested al-Zawahiri’s ruling on the basis of Islamic jurisprudence,[105] and his group continued to operate in Syria. In February 2014, after an eight-month power struggle, al-Qaeda disavowed any relations with ISIL.[43]

According to journalist Sarah Birke, there are “significant differences” between the al-Nusra Front and ISIL. While al-Nusra actively calls for the overthrow of the Assad government, ISIL “tends to be more focused on establishing its own rule on conquered territory”. ISIL is “far more ruthless” in building an Islamic state, “carrying out sectarian attacks and imposing sharia law immediately”. While al-Nusra has a “large contingent of foreign fighters”, it is seen as a home-grown group by many Syrians; by contrast, ISIL fighters have been described as “foreign ‘occupiers'” by many Syrian refugees.[108] It has a strong presence in central and northern Syria, where it has instituted sharia in a number of towns.[108] The group reportedly controlled the four border towns of Atmeh, al-Bab, Azaz and Jarablus, allowing it to control the entrance and exit from Syria into Turkey.[108] Foreign fighters in Syria include Russian-speaking jihadists who were part of Jaish al-Muhajireen wal-Ansar(JMA).[109] In November 2013, the JMA’s Chechen leader Abu Omar al-Shishani swore an oath of allegiance to al-Baghdadi;[110] the group then split between those who followed al-Shishani in joining ISIL and those who continued to operate independently in the JMA under new leadership.[111]

In January 2014, rebels affiliated with the Islamic Front and the US-trained Free Syrian Army[112] launched an offensive against ISIL militants in and around the city of Aleppo in Syria.[113][114] In May 2014, Ayman al-Zawahiri ordered al-Nusra Front to stop its attacks on its rival, ISIL.[115] In June 2014, after continued fighting between the two groups, al-Nusra’s branch in the Syrian town of Al-Bukamal pledged allegiance to ISIL.[116][117] In mid-June 2014, ISIL captured the Trabil crossing on the Jordan–Iraq border,[118] the only border crossing between the two countries.[119] ISIL has received some public support in Jordan, albeit limited, partly owing to state repression there,[120] but ISIL has undertaken a recruitment drive in Saudi Arabia,[121] where tribes in the north are linked to those in western Iraq and eastern Syria.[122]

As self-proclaimed Islamic State (June 2014–present)

On 29 June 2014, the organization proclaimed a Worldwide Caliphate.[28] Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi—known by his supporters as Amir al-Mu’minin, Caliph Ibrahim—was named its Caliph, and the group renamed itself the “Islamic State“.[39] As a “Caliphate,” it claims religious, political and military authority over all Muslims worldwide.[29][41] The concept of a Caliphate and the name “Islamic State” has been rejected by governments and Muslim leaders worldwide.[30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37][66]

In June and July 2014, Jordan and Saudi Arabia moved troops to their borders with Iraq, after Iraq lost control of, or withdrew from, strategic crossing points that had then come under the control of ISIL, or tribes that supported ISIL.[119][123]There was speculation that Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki had ordered a withdrawal of troops from the Iraq–Saudi crossings in order “to increase pressure on Saudi Arabia and bring the threat of ISIS over-running its borders as well”.[122]

In July 2014, ISIL recruited more than 6,300 fighters, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, some of whom were thought to have previously fought for the Free Syrian Army.[124] Also, on 23 July 2014, Abu Sayyaf leader Isnilon Hapilon swore loyalty to Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in a video, along with the rest of the organization, giving ISIL a presence in the Philippines.[26][125] In September 2014, the group began kidnapping people for ransoming, in the name of ISIL.[126]

On 3 August 2014, ISIL captured the cities of Zumar, Sinjar, and Wana in northern Iraq.[127] The need for food and water for thousands of Yazidis, who fled up a mountain out of fear of approaching hostile ISIL militants, and the threat of genocideto Yazidis and others as announced by ISIL, in addition to protecting Americans in Iraq and supporting Iraq in its fight against the group, were reasons for the US to launch a humanitarian mission on 7 August 2014, to aid the Yazidis stranded on Mount Sinjar[128] and to start an aerial bombing campaign in Iraq on 8 August.

On 11 October 2014, ISIL dispatched 10,000 militants from Syria and Mosul to capture the Iraqi capital city of Baghdad,[129]and Iraqi Army forces and Anbar tribesmen threatened to abandon their weapons if the US did not send in ground troops to halt ISIL’s advance.[130] On 13 October, ISIL fighters advanced to within 25 kilometers—15.5 miles—of Baghdad Airport.[131]

At the end of October 2014, 800 radical militants gained control of the Libyan city of Derna pledged their allegiance to Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, thus making Derna the first city outside Syria and Iraq to be a part of the “Islamic State Caliphate.”[132]On 2 November 2014, according to the Associated Press, in response to the coalition airstrikes, representatives from Ahrar ash-Sham attended a meeting with the al-Nusra Front, the Khorasan Group, ISIL, and Jund al-Aqsa, which sought to unite these hard-line groups against the US-led Coalition and moderate Syrian rebel groups.[133] However, by 14 November 2014, it was revealed that the negotiations had failed.[134] On 10 November 2014, a major faction of the Egyptian militant group Ansar Bait al-Maqdis also pledged its allegiance to ISIL.[135]

In mid-January 2015, it was revealed that ISIL had the dozens in Yemen since December 2014, and that they were coming into direct competition with al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula with their recruitment drive.[136]

In January 2015, Afghan officials confirmed that ISIL had a military presence in Afghanistan,[137] recruiting over 135 militants by late January. However, by the end of January 2015, 65 of the militants were either captured or killed by theTaliban, and ISIL’s top Afghan recruiter, Mullah Abdul Rauf, was captured by the Taliban.[138][139][140]

In late January 2015, it was revealed that ISIL members infiltrated the European Union and disguised themselves as civilian refugees who were emigrating from the war zones of Iraq and the Levant.[141] An ISIL representative said that ISIL had successfully smuggled 4,000 fighters, and that the smuggled fighters were planning attacks in Europe in retaliation to the airstrikes carried out against ISIL targets in Iraq and Syria. However, experts believe that the claim of 4,000 was exaggerated to boost their stature and spread fear, although they acknowledged that some Western countries were aware of the smuggling.[142]

In early February 2015, ISIL militants in Libya managed to capture part of the countryside to the west of Sabha, and later, an area encompassing the cities of Sirte, Nofolia, and a military base to the south of both cities.

On 16 February 2015, Egypt began conducting airstrikes in Libya, in retaliation against ISIL’s beheading of 2 Egyptian Christians. By the end of that day, 64 ISIL militants in Libya had been killed by the airstrikes, including 50 militants in Derna.[143]

Group goals, structure and characteristics

Goals

From at least since 2004, a significant goal of the group has been the foundation of an Islamic state.[144][145] Specifically, ISIL has sought to establish itself as a Caliphate, an Islamic state led by a group of religious authorities under a supreme leader—the Caliph—who is believed to be the successor to Muhammad.[146] In June 2014, ISIL published a document in which it claimed to have traced the lineage of its leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi back to Muhammad,[146] and upon proclaiming a new Caliphate on 29 June, the group appointed al-Baghdadi as its caliph. As Caliph, he demands the allegiance of all devout Muslims worldwide, according to Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh).[147]

Areas controlled (as of 3 February 2015)     Remaining territory in countries with ISIL presence

When the Caliphate was proclaimed, ISIL stated: “The legality of all emirates, groups, states and organizations becomes null by the expansion of the khilafah’s [caliphate’s] authority and arrival of its troops to their areas.”[146] This was a rejection of the political divisions in the Middle East that were established by Western powers during World War I in the Sykes–Picot Agreement.[148][149][150]

In late 2014, ISIL claimed that they would humiliate U.S. soldiers in Syria and raise the “flag of Allah” over the White House.[151] ISIL also threatened to “liberate” Istanbul if Turkey did not open a dam that has been limiting the flow of water to Syria and Iraq.[151] Recruits are encouraged to “set out in jihad” if they “desire what God had promised.”[151] Speaking to Westerners, one fighter from Belgium said, “God willing, the Caliphate has been established and we are going to invade you as you invaded us. We will capture your women as you captured our women. We will orphan your children as you orphaned our children.”[151] Also, in late September 2014, it was revealed that ISIL planned to kill 10 million Americans as retribution for their perceived role of America in killing “10 million Muslims.”[152]

Territorial control and provinces

In Iraq and Syria, ISIL uses many of the existing Governorate boundaries to subdivide its claimed territory; it calls these divisions wilayah or provinces.[153] After a series of expansions, as of November 2014, it claims provinces and controls territory in Iraq, Syria, Sinai, and eastern Libya. ISIL also claims provinces and has members in Algeria, Lebanon, Jordan,Saudi Arabia, Yemen, and Turkey, but it does not control territory in these areas.

Barqa Province

On 5 October 2014, The Shura Council of Islamic Youth and other militants in Libya were absorbed and designated the Barka Province of ISIL.[154][155] There are 800 fighters reported to be operating within Libya. The Libyan branch of ISIL has been the most active and successful out of all the ISIL branches outside of Iraq and Syria. They appear to be active mainly in the eastern urban centres of Derna and Benghazi. The group was responsible for the 2015 Corinthia Hotel attack, which saw between 9–10 people killed.[156] ISIL forces in Libya have also seized control of the city Derna.

On 4 January 2015, ISIL forces in Libya also seized control of the eastern countryside of Sabha, executing 14 Libyan soldiers in the process.[157][158]

Sinai Province

On 10 November 2014, many members of the group Ansar Bait al-Maqdis took an oath of allegiance to Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of ISIL.[159] ISIL supporters from the group describe themselves as “Sinai Province” (Arabic: ولاية سيناء‎ Wilayat Sinai).[160][161] A faction of the Sinai group also operates in the Gaza Strip, which has renamed itself to the Islamic State in Gaza.[162]

When Ansar Bait al-Maqdis was dissolved, a large Sinai-based part of the group pledging allegiance to ISIL assumed the designation Sinai Province of ISIL.[154][163] They are estimated to have 1,000–2,000[26] fighters.[164]

Khorasan Province

On 29 January 2014, Hafiz Saeed Khan and Abdul Rauf swore an oath of allegiance to Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of ISIL. Khan was named as the Emir (Governor) of the Province and Rauf as his deputy. The province includes Afghanistan, Pakistan, and “other nearby lands”.[165][166][167][168]

Algerian Province

Members of Jund al-Khilafah swore allegiance to ISIL in September 2014.[24] ISIL in Algeria gained notoriety when it beheaded French tourist Herve Gourdel in September 2014. Since then, the group has largely been silent, with reports that its leader Khalid Abu-Sulayman was killed by Algerian forces in December 2014.[169]

Other areas

  • Unidentified militants in Saudi Arabia and Yemen – are described as ISIL provinces[24]
  • Militants of the group Sons of the Call for Tawhid and Jihad (Jordan) pledging allegiance to ISIL
  • Militants of the groups Jundallah,[170] Tehreek-e-Khilafat, and Jamaat-ul-Ahrar[26] (Pakistan) pledging allegiance to ISIL
  • Militants of the group Abu Sayyaf (Philippines, Malaysia)[171] pledging allegiance to ISIL[26]
  • Almost all the commanders of the Caucasus Emirate in Chechnya and Dagestan have switched their allegiance to ISIL.[172]

Leadership and governance

Mugshot of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi by US armed forces while in detention at Camp Bucca in 2004

The group is headed and run by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, with a cabinet of advisers. There are two deputy leaders, Abu Muslim al-Turkmani (KIA) for Iraq and Abu Ali al-Anbari for Syria, and 12 local governors in Iraq and Syria. Beneath the leaders are councils on finance, leadership, military matters, legal matters—including decisions on executions—foreign fighters’ assistance, security, intelligence and media. In addition, a Shura council has the task of ensuring that all decisions made by the governors and councils comply with the group’s interpretation of sharia.[173] The majority of the ISIL’s leadership is dominated by Iraqis, especially among former members of Saddam Hussein’s regime. It has been reported that Iraqis and Syrians have been given greater precedence over other nationalities within ISIL.[174][175][176][177]

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi delivering a sermon in the Great Mosque of al-Nuriin Mosul (July 2014)

The Wall Street Journal estimated in September 2014 that eight million Iraqis and Syrians live in areas controlled by ISIL.[178] Ar-Raqqah in Syria is the de facto headquarters, and is said to be a test case of ISIL governance.[179] As of September 2014, governance in Ar-Raqqah has been under the total control of ISIL where it has rebuilt the structure of modern government in less than a year. Former government workers from the Assad government maintained their jobs after pledging allegiance to ISIL. Institutions, restored and restructured provided their respective services. The Ar-Raqqah dam continues to provide electricity and water. Foreign expertise supplements Syrian officials in running civilian institutions. Only the police and soldiers are ISIL fighters, who receive confiscated lodging previously owned by non-Sunnis and others who fled. Welfare services are provided, price controls established, and taxes imposed on the wealthy. ISIL runs a soft power program in the areas under its control in Iraq and Syria, which includes social services, religious lectures and da’wah—proselytizing—to local populations. It also performs public services such as repairing roads and maintaining the electricity supply.[180]

British security expert Frank Gardner has concluded that ISIL’s prospects of maintaining control and rule are greater in 2014 than they were in 2006. Despite being as brutal as before, ISIL has become “well entrenched” among the population and is not likely to be dislodged by ineffective Syrian or Iraqi forces. It has replaced corrupt governance with functioning locally controlled authorities, services have been restored and there are adequate supplies of water and oil. With Western-backed intervention being unlikely, the group will “continue to hold their ground” and rule an area “the size of Pennsylvania for the foreseeable future”, he said.[153][181]Further solidifying ISIL rule is the control of wheat production, which is roughly 40% of Iraq’s production. ISIL has maintained food production, crucial to governance and popular support.[182]

Ideology and beliefs

ISIL is a Salafi or Wahhabi extremist group.[183][184] It follows an extreme interpretation of Islam, promotes religious violence, and regards those who do not agree with its interpretations as infidels or apostates—see takfirism.[7] ISIL has demonstrated that ideology and adherence to Islamic beliefs and laws are secondary to its criminal financial enterprises supporting the group’s activities.[185] ISIL’s philosophy is well represented by the symbolism in the Black Standard variant of the legendary battle flag of Muhammad that it has adopted. The flag shows the seal of the Muhammad within a white circle, with the phrase above it, “There is no God but Allah“.[186] Such symbolism has been said to point to ISIL’s belief that it represents the restoration of the caliphate of early Islam, with all the political, religious and eschatological ramifications that this would imply.[187] Saudi Arabia was criticised by Noam Chomsky in October 2014 of having “long been the major source of funding for ISIS as well as providing its ideological roots” (i.e. Salafism or Wahhabism).[188] According to Owen Jones at The Guardian, “Salafists across the Middle East receive ideological and material backing from within the kingdom” of Saudi Arabia, and America knows this, with Hillary Clinton having called Saudi donors “the most significant source of funding to Sunni terrorist groups worldwide”.[189] Some people in Saudi Arabia applaud that ISIS is fighting Iranian Shiite “fire” with Sunni “fire”.[190]

According to some observers, ISIL emerged from the ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood, the first post-Ottoman Islamist group dating back to the late 1920s in Egypt.[191] It adheres to global jihadist principles and follows the hard-line ideology ofal-Qaeda and many other modern-day jihadist groups.[23][7]

However, other sources trace the group’s roots not to the Islamism of the Muslim Brotherhood and the more mainstream jihadism of al-Qaeda, but to Wahhabism. The New York Times wrote:

For their guiding principles, the leaders of the Islamic State … are open and clear about their almost exclusive commitment to the Wahhabi movement of Sunni Islam. The group circulates images of Wahhabi religious textbooks from Saudi Arabia in the schools it controls. Videos from the group’s territory have shown Wahhabi texts plastered on the sides of an official missionary van.[192]

ISIL aims to return to the early days of Islam, rejecting all innovations in the religion, which it believes corrupt its original spirit. It condemns later caliphates and the Ottoman Empire for deviating from what it calls pure Islam,[193] and seeks to revive the original Wahhabi project of the restoration of the caliphate governed by strict Salafist doctrine. Following Salafi-Wahhabi tradition, ISIL condemns the followers of secular law as disbelievers, putting the current Saudi government in that category.[194]

Salafists such as ISIL believe that only a legitimate authority can undertake the leadership of jihad, and that the first priority over other areas of combat, such as fighting non-Muslim countries, is the purification of Islamic society. For example, ISIL regards the Palestinian Sunni group Hamas as apostates who have no legitimate authority to lead jihad and it regards fighting Hamas as the first step toward confrontation with Israel.[192][195]

Eschatology

One difference between ISIL and other Islamist and jihadist movements is its emphasis on eschatology and apocalypticism, and its belief that the arrival of the Mahdi is imminent. ISIL believes it will defeat the army of “Rome” at the town of Dabiq in fulfillment of prophecy. According to ISIL, true Islam ceased to exist for over a thousand years and was only restored in 2014 with the declaration of al-Baghdadi as caliph. They argue that one cannot be fully Islamic without pledging allegiance to a true caliph.[196]

Theological objections

According to The New York Times, “All of the most influential jihadist theorists are criticizing the Islamic State as deviant, calling its self-proclaimed caliphate null and void” and have denounced it for its beheading of journalists and aid workers.[192] ISIL is widely denounced by a broad range of Islamic clerics, including al-Qaeda-oriented and Saudi clerics.[192][8]

Sunni critics, including Salafi and jihadist muftis such as Adnan al-Aroor and Abu Basir al-Tartusi, say that ISIL and related terrorist groups are not Sunnis, but modern-day Khawarij—Muslims who have stepped outside the mainstream of Islam—serving an imperial anti-Islamic agenda.[197][198][199][200] Other critics of ISIL’s brand of Sunni Islam include Salafists who previously publicly supported jihadist groups such as al-Qaeda, for example the Saudi government official Saleh Al-Fawzan, known for his extremist views, who claims that ISIL is a creation of “Zionists, Crusaders and Safavids”, and the Jordanian-Palestinian writer Abu Muhammad al-Maqdisi, the former spiritual mentor to Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, who was released from prison in Jordan in June 2014 and accuses ISIL of driving a wedge between Muslims.[200]

Non-combatants

Although the Islamic State attracts extremists from different parts of the world by promoting the image of holy war, not all of them end up in combatant roles. There have been several cases of new recruits who expected to be mujihadeen that returned from Syria disappointed by the everyday jobs that had been assigned to them, like drawing water or cleaning toilets, or by the ban imposed on use of mobile phones during military trainings.[201]

ISIL also publishes material directed to women. Although women are not allowed to take up arms, media groups encourage them to play supportive roles within ISIL: providing first aid, cooking, nursing and sewing, to become “good wives of jihad”.[202]

Designation as a terrorist organization

Organisation Date Faction References
Multinational Organizations
 United Nations 18 October 2004 United Nations Security Council [203][204]
 European Union 2004 EU Council (via adoption of UN al-Qaida Sanctions List) [205]
Nations
 United Kingdom March 2001 (as part of al-Qaeda)
20 June 2014 (after separation from al‑Qaeda)
Home Secretary of the Home Office [206]
 United States 17 December 2004 United States Department of State [207]
 Australia 2 March 2005 Attorney-General for Australia [208]
 Canada 20 August 2012 Parliament of Canada [209]
 Turkey 30 October 2013 Grand National Assembly of Turkey [210][211]
 Saudi Arabia 7 March 2014 Royal decree of the King of Saudi Arabia [212]
 Indonesia 1 August 2014 National Counter-terrorism Agency BNPT (id) [213]
 UAE 20 August 2014 UAE Cabinet [214]
 Israel 3 September 2014 Ministry of Defense [215]
 Malaysia 24 September 2014 Ministry of Foreign Affairs [216]
 Egypt 30 November 2014 The Cairo Court for Urgent Matters [217][218]
 India 16 December 2014 Ministry of Home Affairs [219][220]
 Russia 29 December 2014 Supreme Court of Russia [221]

The United Nations Security Council in its Resolution 1267 (1999) described Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaeda associates as operators of a network of terrorist training camps.[222] The UN’s Al-Qaida Sanctions Committee first listed ISIL in its Sanctions List under the name “Al-Qaida in Iraq” on 18 October 2004, as an entity/group associated with al-Qaeda. On 2 June 2014, the group was added to its listing under the name “Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant”. The European Unionadopted the UN Sanctions List in 2002.[205]

Many world leaders and government spokespeople have called ISIL a terrorist group or banned it, without their countries having formally designated it as such. Some examples:

The Government of Germany banned ISIL in September 2014. Activities banned include donations to the group, recruiting fighters, holding ISIL meetings and distributing its propaganda, flying ISIL flags, wearing ISIL symbols and all ISIL activities. “The terror organisation Islamic State is a threat to public safety in Germany as well,” de Mazière said. “Today’s ban is directed solely against terrorists who abuse religion for their criminal goals.” The ban does not mean ISIL has been outlawed as a foreign terrorist organisation, as that requires a court judgement.[223]

In October 2014, Switzerland banned ISIL’s activities in the country, including propaganda and financial support of the fighters, with prison sentences as potential penalties.[224]

In mid-December 2014, India banned ISIL, after arresting the operator of a pro-ISIL Twitter account.[225]

Media sources worldwide have also called ISIL a terrorist organization.[226][227][228][229][230]

Human rights abuse and war crime findings

In July 2014, the BBC reported the United Nations‘ chief investigator as stating: “Fighters from the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) may be added to a list of war crimes suspects in Syria.”[231] By June 2014, according to United Nations reports, ISIL had killed hundreds of prisoners of war[232] and over 1,000 civilians.[233][234][235] In August 2014, the UN accused ISIL of committing “mass atrocities” and war crimes,[236][237] including the mass killing of up to 250 Syrian Armysoldiers near Tabqa Air base.[232] Other known killing of military prisoners took place in Camp Speicher (1,095–1,700 Iraqi soldiers shot and “thousands” more “missing”)[238][239] and the Shaer gas field (200 Syrian soldiers shot).[240] Navi Pillay, UNHigh Commissioner for Human Rights, said that they were performing “widespread ethnic and religious cleansing in the areas under their control.”[241]

In early September 2014, the United Nations Human Rights Council agreed to send a team to Iraq and Syria to investigate the abuses and killings being carried out by the ISIL on “an unimaginable scale”. Prince Zeid bin Ra’ad, the newly appointedUN High Commissioner for Human Rights, urged world leaders to step in to protect women and children suffering at the hands of ISIL militants, who he said were trying to create a “house of blood”. He appealed to the international community to concentrate its efforts on ending the conflict in Iraq and Syria.[242]

In November 2014, the UN Commission of Inquiry on Syria said that ISIL was committing crimes against humanity.[243][244]A report by Human Rights Watch in November 2014 accused ISIL groups in control of Derna, Libya of war crimes andhuman rights abuses and of terrorizing residents. Human Rights Watch documented three apparent summary executions and at least ten public floggings by the Islamic Youth Shura Council, which joined ISIL in November. It also documented the beheading of three Derna residents and dozens of seemingly politically motivated assassinations of judges, public officials, members of the security forces and others. Sarah Leah Watson, Director of HRW Middle East and North Africa, said: “Commanders should understand that they may face domestic or international prosecution for the grave rights abuses their forces are committing.”[245]

Speaking of ISIL’s methods, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights has stated that the group “seeks to subjugate civilians under its control and dominate every aspect of their lives through terror, indoctrination, and the provision of services to those who obey”.[246]

Religious and minority group persecution

ISIL compels people in the areas that it controls to declare Islamic creed and live according to its interpretation of Sunni Islam and sharia law.[226][247] There have been many reports of the group’s use of death threats, torture and mutilation to compel conversion to Islam,[226][247] and of clerics being killed for refusal to pledge allegiance to the so-called “Islamic State”.[248] ISIL directs violence against Shia Muslims, indigenous Assyrian, Chaldean, Syriac and Armenian Christians,Yazidis, Druze, Shabaks and Mandeans in particular.[249]

Amnesty International has held ISIL responsible for the ethnic cleansing of ethnic and religious minority groups in northern Iraq on a “historic scale”. In a special report released on 2 September 2014, it describes how ISIL has “systematically targeted non-Arab and non-Sunni Muslim communities, killing or abducting hundreds, possibly thousands, and forcing more than 830,000 others to flee the areas it has captured since 10 June 2014”. Among these people are Assyrian Christians,Turkmen Shia, Shabak Shia, Yazidis, Kaka’i and Sabean Mandeans, who have lived together for centuries in Ninevehprovince, large parts of which are now under ISIL’s control.[250][251]

Among the known killings of religious and minority group civilians carried out by ISIL are those in the villages and towns ofQuiniyeh (70–90 Yazidis killed), Hardan (60 Yazidis killed), Sinjar (200–500 Yazidis killed), Ramadi Jabal (60–70 Yazidis killed), Dhola (50 Yazidis killed), Khana Sor (100 Yazidis killed), Hardan (250–300 Yazidis killed), al-Shimal (dozens of Yazidis killed), Khocho (400 Yazidis killed and 1,000 abducted), Jadala (14 Yadizis killed)[252] and Beshir (700 Shia Turkmen killed),[253] and others committed near Mosul (670 Shia inmates of the Badush prison killed),[253] and in Tal Afarprison, Iraq (200 Yazidis killed for refusing conversion).[252] The UN estimated that 5,000 Yazidis were killed by ISIL during the takeover of parts of northern Iraq in August 2014.[254] In late May 2014, 150 Kurdish boys from Kobani aged 14–16 were abducted and subjected to torture and abuse, according to Human Rights Watch.[255] In the Syrian towns of Ghraneij,Abu Haman and Kashkiyeh 700 members of the Sunni Al-Shaitat tribe were killed for attempting an uprising against ISIL control.[256][257] The UN reported that in June 2014 ISIL had killed a number of Sunni Islamic clerics who refused to pledge allegiance to it.[248]

Christians living in areas under ISIL control who want to remain in the “caliphate” face three options: converting to Islam, paying a religious levy—jizya—or death.[258][259] “We offer them three choices: Islam; the dhimma contract – involving payment of jizya; if they refuse this they will have nothing but the sword”, ISIL said.[260] ISIL had already set similar rules for Christians in Ar-Raqqah, once one of Syria’s more liberal cities.[261][262]

Treatment of civilians

During the Iraqi conflict in 2014, ISIL released dozens of videos showing its ill treatment of civilians, many of whom had apparently been targeted on the basis of their religion or ethnicity. Navi Pillay, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, warned of war crimes being committed in the Iraqi war zone, and disclosed a UN report of ISIL militants murdering Iraqi Army soldiers and 17 civilians in a single street in Mosul. The UN reported that in the 17 days from 5 to 22 June, ISIL killed more than 1,000 Iraqi civilians and injured more than 1,000.[233][234][235] After ISIL released photographs of its fighters shooting scores of young men, the UN declared that cold-blooded “executions” by militants in northern Iraq almost certainly amounted to war crimes.[263]

ISIL’s advance in Iraq in mid-2014 was accompanied by continuing violence in Syria. On 29 May, ISIL raided a village in Syria and at least 15 civilians were killed, including, according to Human Rights Watch, at least six children.[264] A hospital in the area confirmed that it had received 15 bodies on the same day.[265] The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported that on 1 June, a 102-year-old man was killed along with his whole family in a village in Hama province.[266] According to The Reuters 1878 people were killed in Syria by ISIL during the last six months of 2014, most of them civilians.[267]

In Mosul, ISIL has implemented a sharia school curriculum which bans the teaching of art, music, national history, literature and Christianity. Although Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution has never been taught in Iraqi schools, the subject has been banned from the school curriculum. Patriotic songs have been declared blasphemous, and orders have been given to remove certain pictures from school textbooks.[268][269][270][271] Iraqi parents have largely boycotted schools in which the new curriculum has been introduced.[272]

After capturing cities in Iraq, ISIL issued guidelines on how to wear clothes and veils. ISIL warned women in the city of Mosul to wear full-face veils or face severe punishment.[273] A cleric told Reuters in Mosul that ISIL gunmen had ordered him to read out the warning in his mosque when worshippers gathered. ISIL ordered the faces of both male and female mannequins to be covered, in an order which also banned the use of naked mannequins.[274] In Ar-Raqqah the group uses its two battalions of female fighters in the city to enforce compliance by women with its strict laws on individual conduct.[275]

ISIL released 16 notes labeled “Contract of the City”, a set of rules aimed at civilians in Nineveh. One rule stipulated that women should stay at home and not go outside unless necessary. Another rule said that stealing would be punished by amputation.[180][276] In addition to the Muslim custom of banning the sale and use of alcohol, ISIL has banned the sale and use of cigarettes and hookah pipes. It has also banned “music and songs in cars, at parties, in shops and in public, as well as photographs of people in shop windows”.[277]

According to The Economist, dissidents in the ISIL capital of Ar-Raqqah report that “all 12 of the judges who now run its court system … are Saudis”. Saudi practices also followed by the group include the establishment of religious police to root out “vice” and enforce attendance at salat prayers, the widespread use of capital punishment, and the destruction of Christian churches and non-Sunni mosques or their conversion to other uses.[278]

ISIL carried out executions on both men and women who were accused of various acts and found guilty of crimes against Islam such as homosexuality, adultery, watching pornography, usage and possession of contraband, rape, blasphemy, renouncing Islam and murder. Before the accused are executed their charges are read toward them and the spectators. They carry out executions in various forms such as stoning to death, crucifixions, beheadings and some are thrown from the top storeys of tall buildings.[279][280][281]

Child soldiers

ISIL has recruited Iraqi children as young as nine to its ranks, who can be seen with masks on their faces and guns in their hands patrolling the streets of Mosul and even making arrests.[282] According to a report by the magazine Foreign Policy, children as young as six are recruited or kidnapped and sent to military and religious training camps, where they practise beheading with dolls and are indoctrinated with the religious views of ISIL. Children are used as human shields on front lines and to provide blood transfusions for Islamic State soldiers, according to Shelly Whitman of the Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative. The second instalment of a Vice News documentary about ISIL focused on how the group is specifically grooming children for the future. A spokesman told VICE News that those under the age of 15 go to sharia camp to learn about religion, while those older than 16 can go to military training camp. Children are also used for propaganda. According to a UN report, “In mid-August, ISIL entered a cancer hospital in Mosul, forced at least two sick children to hold the ISIL flag and posted the pictures on the internet.” Misty Buswell, a Save the Children representative working with refugees in Jordan, said, “It’s not an exaggeration to say we could lose a whole generation of children to trauma.”[283]

Sexual violence and slavery

There are many reports of sexual abuse and enslavement in ISIL controlled areas of women and girls, predominantly from the minority Christian and Yazidi communities.[284][285] According to one report, ISIL’s capture of Iraqi cities in June 2014 was accompanied by an upsurge in crimes against women, including kidnap and rape.[286][287][288] The Guardian reported that ISIL’s extremist agenda extended to women’s bodies and that women living under their control were being captured and raped.[289] Fighters are told that they are free to have sex and rape non-Muslim captive women.[290] A Baghdad-based women’s rights activist, Basma al-Khateeb, said that a culture of violence existed in Iraq against women generally and felt sure that sexual violence against women was happening in Mosul involving not only ISIL but all armed groups.[291] During a meeting with Nouri al-Maliki, British Foreign Minister William Hague said with regard to ISIL: “Anyone glorifying, supporting or joining it should understand that they would be assisting a group responsible for kidnapping, torture, executions, rapeand many other hideous crimes”.[292] According to Martin Williams in The Citizen, some hard-line Salafists apparently regard extramarital sex with multiple partners as a legitimate form of holy war and it is “difficult to reconcile this with a religion where some adherents insist that women must be covered from head to toe, with only a narrow slit for the eyes”.[293]

Haleh Esfandiari from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars has highlighted the abuse of local women by ISIL militants after they have captured an area. “They usually take the older women to a makeshift slave market and try to sell them. The younger girls … are raped or married off to fighters”, she said, adding, “It’s based on temporary marriages, and once these fighters have had sex with these young girls, they just pass them on to other fighters.”[294] Speaking ofYazidi women captured by ISIL, Nazand Begikhani said, “These women have been treated like cattle… They have been subjected to physical and sexual violence, including systematic rape and sex slavery. They’ve been exposed in markets in Mosul and in Raqqa, Syria, carrying price tags.”[295] Yazidi girls in Iraq allegedly raped by ISIL fighters have committedsuicide by jumping to their death from Mount Sinjar, as described in a witness statement.[296]

A United Nations report issued on 2 October 2014, based on 500 interviews with witnesses, said that ISIL took 450–500 women and girls to Iraq’s Nineveh region in August, where “150 unmarried girls and women, predominantly from the Yazidi and Christian communities, were reportedly transported to Syria, either to be given to ISIL fighters as a reward or to be sold as sex slaves”.[285] In mid-October, the UN confirmed that 5,000–7,000 Yazidi women and children had been abducted by ISIL and sold into slavery.[297][298] In November 2014 The New York Times reported on the accounts given by five who escaped ISIL of their captivity and abuse.[299] In December 2014 the Iraqi Ministry of Human Rights announced that ISIL had killed over 150 women and girls in Fallujah who refused to participate in sexual jihad.[300][301] Non-Muslim women have reportedly been married off to fighters against their will. ISIL claims the women provide the new converts and children necessary to spread ISIL’s control.[302] Shortly after the death of U.S. hostage Kayla Mueller was confirmed on February 10, 2015,.[303][304][305][306] several media outlets reported that the U.S. intelligence community believed she may have been given as a wife to an ISIL fighter.[307][308][309]

In its digital magazine Dabiq, ISIL explicitly claimed religious justification for enslaving Yazidi women.[310][311][312][313][314][315]According to The Wall Street Journal, ISIL appeals to apocalyptic beliefs and claims “justification by a Hadith that they interpret as portraying the revival of slavery as a precursor to the end of the world”.[316] ISIL appeals to the Hadith andQur’an when claiming the right to enslave and rape captive non-Muslim women.[317][313][318] According to Dabiq, “enslaving the families of the kuffar and taking their women as concubines is a firmly established aspect of the Sharia’s that if one were to deny or mock, he would be denying or mocking the verses of the Qur’an and the narration of the Prophet … and thereby apostatizing from Islam.” Captured Yazidi women and children are divided among the fighters who captured them, with one fifth taken as a tax.[318][319] ISIL has received widespread criticism from Muslim scholars and others in the Muslim world for using part of the Qur’an to derive a ruling in isolation, rather than considering the entire Qur’an and Hadith.[317][313][318]According to Mona Siddiqui, ISIL’s “narrative may well be wrapped up in the familiar language of jihad and ‘fighting in the cause of Allah’, but it amounts to little more than destruction of anything and anyone who doesn’t agree with them”; she describes ISIL as reflecting a “lethal mix of violence and sexual power” and a “deeply flawed view of manhood”.[302] Dabiqdescribes “this large-scale enslavement” of non-Muslims as “probably the first since the abandonment of Shariah law”.[318][319]

In late 2014 ISIL released a pamphlet that focused on the treatment of female slaves.[320][321][322] It says fighters are allowed to have sex with adolescent girls and to beat slaves as discipline. The pamphlet’s guidelines also allow fighters to trade slaves, including for sex, as long as they have not been impregnated by their owner.ISIL claims that sexual slavery is justified only against infidels (non-Muslims) according to the koran.[320][321][322][323][324][325] Charlie Winter, a researcher at the counter-extremist think tank Quilliam, described the pamphlet as “abhorent”.[323][325] In response to this document Abbas Barzegar, a religion professor at Georgia State University, said Muslims around the world find ISIL’s “alien interpretation of Islam grotesque and abhorrent”.[324] Muslim leaders and scholars from around the world have rejected the validity of these claims, claiming that the reintroduction of slavery is unislamic, that they are required to protect ‘People of the Scripture’ including Christians, Jews, Muslims and Yazidis, and that ISIL’s fatwas are invalid due to their lack of religious authority and the fatwas’ inconsistency with Islam.[326][327]

Attacks on members of the press

The Committee to Protect Journalists states: “Without a free press, few other human rights are attainable.”[328] ISIL has tortured and murdered local journalists,[329][330] creating what Reporters Without Borders calls “news blackholes” in areas controlled by ISIL. ISIL fighters have reportedly been given written directions to kill or capture journalists.[331]

In December 2013, two suicide bombers stormed the headaquarters of TV station Salaheddin and killed five journalists, after accusing the station of “distorting the image of Iraq’s Sunni community”. Reporters Without Borders reported that on 7 September 2014, ISIL seized and on 11 October publicly beheaded Raad al-Azzawi, a TV Salaheddin cameraman from the village of Samra, east of Tikrit.[332] As of October 2014, according to the Journalistic Freedoms Observatory, ISIL is holding nine journalists and has nine others under close observation in Mosul and Salahuddin province.[331]

During 2013 and part of 2014, an ISIL unit nicknamed the Beatles acquired and held 12 Western journalists hostage, along with aid workers and other foreign hostages, totaling 23 or 24 known hostages. A Polish journalist Marcin Suder was captured in July 2013 but escaped four months later.[333] The unit executed American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff and released beheading videos. Eight of the other journalists were released for ransom: Danish journalist Daniel Rye Ottosen, French journalists Didier François, Edouard Elias, Nicolas Hénin, and Pierre Torres, and Spanish journalists Marc Marginedas, Javier Espinosa, and Ricardo García Vilanova. The unit continues to hold hostage British journalist John Cantlie and a female aid worker.[334]

Cyber-security group the Citizen Lab released a report finding a possible link between ISIL and a digital attack on the Syrian citizen media group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently (RSS). Supporters of the media group received an emailed link to an image of supposed airstrikes, but clicking on the link introduced malware to the user’s computer that sends details of the user’s IP address and system each time it restarts. That information has been enough to allow ISIL to locate RSS supporters. “The group has been targeted for kidnappings, house raids, and at least one alleged targeted killing. At the time of that writing, ISIL was allegedly holding several citizen journalists in Raqqa,” according to the Citizen Lab report.[335]

On January 8, 2015, ISIL members in Libya claimed to have executed Tunisian journalists Sofiene Chourabi and Nadhir Ktari who disappeared in September 2014.[336] Also in January 2015, Japanese journalist Kenji Goto Jogo was captured after traveling to Raqqah and displayed on video with another Japanese citizen with a demand for $200 million ransom.

Beheadings and mass executions

An unknown number of Syrians and Iraqis, several Lebanese soldiers, at least ten Kurds, two American journalists, one American and two British aid workers, and three Libyans have been beheaded by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. ISIL uses beheadings to intimidate local populations and has released a series of propaganda videos aimed at Western countries. They also engage in public and mass executions, sometimes forcing prisoners to dig their own graves before shooting lines of prisoners and pushing them in.[337][338] ISIL was reported to have beheaded about 100 foreign fighters as deserters who tried to leave Raqqa.[339]

Destruction of cultural and religious heritage

UNESCO‘s Director-General Irina Bokova has warned that ISIL is destroying Iraq’s cultural heritage, in what she has termed “cultural cleansing”. “We don’t have time to lose because extremists are trying to erase the identity, because they know that if there is no identity, there is no memory, there is no history”, she said. Referring to the ancient cultures of Christians, Yazidis and other minorities, she said, “This is a way to destroy identity. You deprive them of their culture, you deprive them of their history, their heritage, and that is why it goes hand in hand with genocide. Along with the physical persecution they want to eliminate – to delete – the memory of these different cultures. … we think this is appalling, and this is not acceptable.” [340] Saad Eskander, head of Iraq’s National Archives said, “For the first time you have cultural cleansing… For the Yazidis, religion is oral, nothing is written. By destroying their places of worship … you are killing cultural memory. It is the same with the Christians – it really is a threat beyond belief.”[341]

In order to finance its activities, ISIL is stealing artifacts from Syria[342] and Iraq and sending them to Europe to be sold. It is estimated that ISIL raises US$200 million a year from cultural looting. UNESCO has asked for United Nations Security Council controls on the sale of antiquities, similar to those imposed after the 2003 Iraq War. UNESCO is working withInterpol, national customs authorities, museums, and major auction houses in attempts to prevent looted items being sold.[341] ISIL occupied Mosul Museum, the second most important museum in Iraq, as it was about to reopen after years of rebuilding following the Iraq War, saying that the statues were against Islam and threatening to destroy the museum’s contents.[343][344]

ISIL considers worshipping at graves tantamount to idolatry, and seeks to purify the community of unbelievers. It has used bulldozers to crush buildings and archeological sites.[344] Bernard Haykel has described Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi‘s creed as “a kind of untamed Wahhabism”, saying, “For Al Qaeda, violence is a means to an ends; for ISIS, it is an end in itself”.[192] The destruction by ISIL in July 2014 of the tomb and shrine of the prophet YunusJonah in Christianity—the 13th century mosque of Imam Yahya Abu al-Qassimin, the 14th century shrine of prophet Jerjis—St George to Christians—and the attempted destruction of the Hadba minaret at the 12th century Great Mosque of Al-Nuri have been described as “an unchecked outburst of extreme Wahhabism”.[345] “There were explosions that destroyed buildings dating back to theAssyrian era“, said National Museum of Iraq director Qais Rashid, referring to the destruction of the shrine of Yunus. He cited another case where “Daesh (ISIL) gathered over 1,500 manuscripts from convents and other holy places and burnt all of them in the middle of the city square”.[346]

There is also the fear that warfare waged on any side will harm cultural heritage. “The worst thing about wars is that they do not distinguish between the past and the future”, Mosul calligrapher and conservationist Abdallah Ismail told a local correspondent for the German-funded publication Niqash.org. He suggested that ISIL was “taking the pulse” of the local population to see how it would react to their appetite for destruction. Philippe Lalliot, France’s ambassador to UNESCO gave this perspective: “When people die in their tens of thousands, must we be concerned about cultural cleansing? Yes, definitely yes … It’s because culture is a powerful incentive for dialogue that the most extreme and the most fanatical groups strive to annihilate it.”[346] According to the London Charter and several Hague Conventions, the deliberate destruction of historical sites and places of worship, unless such destruction is a necessity during war, is a war crime.[347]

Organ trafficking

According to media reports, ISIL has established a system for harvesting and selling human organs from fighters, captives, and hostages, including minority children in Mosul and other areas. ISIL is using imported teams of doctors who are not allowed to interact with local medical staff.[348][349][350][351]

Criticism

Islamic criticism

ISIL has been at the receiving end of severe criticism from other Muslims, especially religious scholars and theologians. In late August 2014, the Grand Mufti of Saudi Arabia, Abdul-Aziz ibn Abdullah Al ash-Sheikh, condemned the Islamic State and al-Qaeda saying, “Extremist and militant ideas and terrorism which spread decay on Earth, destroying human civilisation, are not in any way part of Islam, but are enemy number one of Islam, and Muslims are their first victims”.[352] In late September 2014, 126 Sunni imams and Islamic scholars—primarily Sufi[353]—from around the Muslim world signed anopen letter to the Islamic State’s leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, explicitly rejecting and refuting his group’s interpretations of Islamic scriptures, the Qur’an and hadith, used by it to justify its actions.[354][355] “[You] have misinterpreted Islam into a religion of harshness, brutality, torture and murder … this is a great wrong and an offence to Islam, to Muslims and to the entire world”, the letter states.[356] It rebukes the Islamic State for its killing of prisoners, describing the killings as “heinouswar crimes” and its persecution of the Yazidis of Iraq as “abominable”. Referring to the “self-described ‘Islamic State'”, the letter censures the group for carrying out killings and acts of brutality under the guise of jihad—holy struggle—saying that its “sacrifice” without legitimate cause, goals and intention “is not jihad at all, but rather, warmongering and criminality”.[356][357]It also accuses the group of instigating fitna—sedition—by instituting slavery under its rule in contravention of the anti-slavery consensus of the Islamic scholarly community.[356] Other scholars have described the group as not Sunnis, butKhawarij.[358]

Kurdish demonstration against ISIL in Vienna, Austria, 10 October 2014

The group’s declaration of a caliphate has been criticized and its legitimacy disputed by Middle Eastern governments, other jihadist groups,[359] and Sunni Muslimtheologians and historians. Qatar-based TV broadcaster and theologian Yusuf al-Qaradawi stated: “[The] declaration issued by the Islamic State is void under shariaand has dangerous consequences for the Sunnis in Iraq and for the revolt in Syria”, adding that the title of caliph can “only be given by the entire Muslim nation”, not by a single group.[360]

Two days after the beheading of Hervé Gourdel, hundreds of Muslims gathered in the Grand Mosque of Paris to show solidarity against the beheading. The protest was led by the leader of the French Council of the Muslim Faith, Dalil Boubakeur, and was joined by thousands of other Muslims around the country under the slogan “Not in my name”.[361][362] French president François Hollande said Gourdel’s beheading was “cowardly” and “cruel”, and confirmed that airstrikes would continue against ISIL in Iraq. Hollande also called for three days of national mourning, with flags flown at half-mast throughout the country and said that security would be increased throughout Paris.[361]

International criticism

The group has attracted widespread criticism internationally for its extremism, from governments and international bodies such as the United Nations and Amnesty International. On 24 September 2014, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon stated: “As Muslim leaders around the world have said, groups like ISIL – or Da’ish — have nothing to do with Islam, and they certainly do not represent a state. They should more fittingly be called the “Un-Islamic Non-State”.”[363] The group was described as a cult in a Huffington Post column by notable cult authority Steven Hassan.[364]

Criticism of the name “Islamic State” and “caliphate” declaration

The declaration of a new caliphate in June 2014 and the name “Islamic State” have been criticized and ridiculed by Muslim scholars and rival Islamists inside and outside the territory it controls.[31][32][33][34] In a speech in September 2014, President Obama said that, ISIL is not “Islamic” on the basis that no religion condones the killing of innocents and that no governmentrecognises the group as a state,[66] and many object to using the name “Islamic State” owing to the far-reaching religious and political claims to authority which that name implies. The United Nations Security Council, the United States, Canada, Turkey, Australia, Russia, the United Kingdom[35][36][37][365][366][367][368] and other countries generally call the group “ISIL”, while much of the Arab world uses the Arabic acronym “Dāʻish”. France’s Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said “This is a terrorist group and not a state. I do not recommend using the term Islamic State because it blurs the lines between Islam, Muslims, and Islamists. The Arabs call it ‘Daesh’ and I will be calling them the ‘Daesh cutthroats.'”[369] Retired general John Allen, the U.S. envoy to coordinate the coalition, U.S. military Lieutenant General James Terry, head of operations against the group, and Secretary of State John Kerry have all shifted toward the term DAESH by December 2014.[370]

In late August 2014, a leading Islamic educational institution, Dar al-Ifta al-Misriyyah in Egypt, advised Muslims to stop calling the group “Islamic State” and instead refer to it as “Al-Qaeda Separatists in Iraq and Syria” or “QSIS”, because of the militant group’s “un-Islamic character”.[371][372] When addressing the United Nations Security Council in September 2014, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott summarized the widespread objections to the name “Islamic State” thus: “To use this term [Islamic State] is to dignify a death cult; a death cult that, in declaring itself a caliphate, has declared war on the world”.[373] The group is very sensitive about its name. “They will cut your tongue out even if you call them ISIS – you have to say ‘Islamic State'”, said a woman in ISIL-controlled Mosul.[374]

In mid-October 2014, representatives of the Islamic Society of Britain, the Association of British Muslims and the UK’sAssociation of Muslim Lawyers proposed that “‘Un-Islamic State’ (UIS) could be an accurate and fair alternative name to describe this group and its agenda”, further stating, “We need to work together and make sure that these fanatics don’t get the propaganda that they feed off.”[375][376] The “Islamic State” is mocked on social media websites such as Twitter andYouTube, with the use of hashtags, mock recruiting ads, fake news articles and YouTube videos.[377] One parody, by aPalestinian TV satire show, portrays ISIL as “buffoon-like hypocrites”, and has had more than half a million views on YouTube.[377][378]

Analysis

By 2014, ISIL was increasingly being viewed as a militia rather than as a terrorist group.[379] As major Iraqi cities fell to ISIL in June 2014, Jessica Lewis, a former US army intelligence officer at the Institute for the Study of War, described ISIL as “not a terrorism problem anymore”, but rather “an army on the move in Iraq and Syria, and they are taking terrain. They have shadow governments in and around Baghdad, and they have an aspirational goal to govern. I don’t know whether they want to control Baghdad, or if they want to destroy the functions of the Iraqi state, but either way the outcome will be disastrous for Iraq.” Lewis has called ISIL “an advanced military leadership”. She said, “They have incredible command and control and they have a sophisticated reporting mechanism from the field that can relay tactics and directives up and down the line. They are well-financed, and they have big sources of manpower, not just the foreign fighters, but also prisoner escapees.”[379]

While officials[which?] fear that ISIL may either inspire attacks in the United States by sympathizers or by those returning after joining ISIL, US intelligence agencies find there is no immediate threat or specific plots. US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagelsees an “imminent threat to every interest we have”, but former top counterterrorism adviser Daniel Benjamin has derided such alarmist talk as a “farce” that panics the public.[380]

Some news commentators, such as international newspaper columnist Gwynne Dyer,[381] and samples of American public opinion, such as surveys by NPR,[382] have advocated a strong but measured response to ISIL’s recent provocative acts.

Conspiracy theories in the Arab world

Conspiracy theorists in the Arab world have advanced rumors that the U.S. is secretly behind the existence and emboldening of ISIL, as part of an attempt to further destabilize the Middle East. After such rumors became widespread, the U.S. embassy in Lebanon issued an official statement denying the allegations, calling them a complete fabrication.[383]Others[which?] are convinced that ISIL leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is an Israeli Mossad agent and actor called Simon Elliot. The rumors claim that NSA documents leaked by Edward Snowden reveal this connection. Snowden’s lawyer has called the story “a hoax.”[384][385][386]

Countries and groups at war with ISIL

ISIL’s expanding claims to territory have brought it into armed conflict with many governments, militias and other armed groups. International rejection of ISIL as a terrorist entity and rejection of its claim to even exist have placed it in conflict with countries around the world.

Opposition within Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Libya, Afghanistan, and Yemen

Iraqi Insurgency Syrian Civil War Other conflicts
Iraq-based opponentsIraq Iraqi Armed Forces

Iraqi Kurdistan Iraqi Kurdistan

IRGC-Seal.svg Special Groups

Iraqi Turkmen Front[390]

Shabak Militia[391][392]

Syria-based opponents[393]Syria Syrian Armed Forces

Syria Syrian Opposition[394][395][396]

Syrian Kurdistan Syrian Kurdistan[399]

Lebanon-based opponentsLebanon Lebanese Armed Forces[403]

Hezbollah[404]

Egypt-based opponents

Egypt Egyptian Armed Forces[405]

Libya-based opponents

Libya Libyan Armed Forces

Abu Salim Martyrs Brigade (Libyan rebel group)[407]

Afghanistan-based opponents

Afghanistan Afghan Armed Forces[137]
Taliban[408][409]

Yemen-based opponents

Yemen Yemeni Armed Forces[136]
al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula[136]
Houthis[410]

American-led Coalition to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

Airstrikes in Syria by 24 September 2014

The Global Coalition to counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL or Daesh), also referred to as the Counter-ISIL Coalition or Counter-DAESH Coalition,[411] is a US-led group of nations and non-state actors that have committed to “work together under a common, multifaceted, and long-term strategy to degrade and defeat ISIL/Daesh”. According to a joint statement issued by 59 national governments and the European Union, participants in the Counter-ISIL Coalition are focused on multiple lines of effort:[412]

  1. Supporting military operations, capacity building, and training;
  2. Stopping the flow of foreign terrorist fighters;
  3. Cutting off ISIL/Daesh’s access to financing and funding;
  4. Addressing associated humanitarian relief and crises; and
  5. Exposing ISIL/Daesh’s true nature (ideological delegitimization).

Operation Inherent Resolve is the operational name given by the US to military operations against ISIL and Syrian al-Qaeda affiliates. Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve is coordinating the military portion of the response.

The following multi-national organizations are part of the Counter-ISIL Coalition:[412]
 European Union – declared to be part, most members are participating;[412]
 NATO – all 28 members are taking part;
Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf or GCC – all six current members and the two pending members, Jordan and Morocco, are taking part.

Military operations in or over Iraq and/or Syria
airstrikes, air support, and ground forces performing training
Supplying military equipment to opposition forces
within Iraq and/or Syria in cooperation with EU/NATO/partners
Humanitarian and other contributions
to identified coalition objectives
NATO members:

CCASG members:

Other:

Part of the Counter-ISIL Coalition engaged in anti-ISIL military operations within their own borders[412]

Note: Listed countries in this box may also be supplying military and humanitarian aid, and contributing to group objectives in other ways.

NATO members: (also EU members except Albania)

 European Union Members (not in NATO)

Other:

  •  Bosnia and Herzegovina[433]

Note: These countries may also be supplying humanitarian aid and contributing to group objectives in other ways.

NATO members: (who are also EU members, except Iceland)

 European Union Members (not in NATO)

CCASG members:

Other

Other state opponents

 Azerbaijan[436][437] — security operations within state borders

 Iran[438][439] — ground troops, training and air power (see Iranian intervention in Iraq (2014–present))

 Russia[440][441] — arms supplier to Iraqi and Syrian Governments

Other non-state opponents

 Arab League—coordinating member response[442]
al-Qaeda[443]

Afghanistan Taliban[444]
Kurdistan Workers Party of Turkey—ground troops in Iraqi Kurdistan [445]
Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran—ground troops in Iraqi Kurdistan[445]
HouthisShi’ite insurgent group in Yemen backed by Iran, currently participating in an insurgency in Yemen[410]
Anonymous

Supporters

Groups with expressions of support

Memberships of these groups have declared support for ISIL, either fully or in part.

By mid-November 2014, the Terrorism Research and Analysis Consortium (TRAC) in Florida had identified 60 jihadist groups in 30 countries that have pledged allegiance or support to ISIL. “We at TRAC are constantly adding to the list (nearly daily)”, it said. Many of these groups were previously affiliated with al-Qaeda, indicating a shift in global jihadist leadership toward ISIL.[458]

Allegations of Turkish support

Turkey has been accused of supporting or colluding with ISIL, especially by Syrian Kurds.[459][460] According to journalistPatrick Cockburn, there is “strong evidence for a degree of collaboration” between the Turkish intelligence services and ISIL, although the “exact nature of the relationship … remains cloudy”.[461] David L. Phillips of Columbia University‘s Institute for the Study of Human Rights, who compiled a list of allegations and claims accusing Turkey of assisting ISIL, writes that these allegations “range from military cooperation and weapons transfers to logistical support, financial assistance, and the provision of medical services”.[462] Several ISIL fighters and commanders have claimed Turkey supports ISIL.[463][464][465]Within Turkey itself, ISIL is believed to have caused increasing political polarisation between secularists and Islamists.[466]

Turkey has been further criticized for allowing individuals from outside the region to enter its territory and join ISIL in Syria.[467][468] With many Islamist fighters passing through Turkey to fight in Syria, Turkey has been accused of becoming a transit country for such fighters and has been labeled the “Gateway to Jihad”.[469] Turkish border patrol officers are reported to have deliberately overlooked those entering Syria upon the payment of a small bribe.[469] A report by Sky Newsexposed documents showing that passports of foreign Islamists wanting to join ISIL by crossing into Syria had been stamped by the Turkish government.[470] An ISIL commander stated that “most of the fighters who joined us in the beginning of the war came via Turkey, and so did our equipment and supplies”,[465][471] adding that ISIL fighters received treatment in Turkish hospitals.[465]

Allegations of Saudi Arabia’s support

Although Saudi Arabia‘s government rejected these claims,[472] the Iraqi President Nouri al-Maliki[473] and some media outlets like NBC, BBC, and NYTimes stated that Saudi Arabia is funding ISIL.[474][475][476][477]

Military and resources

Military

Main article: Military of ISIL

ISIL fighters seen here in the Anbar province, Iraq.

Estimates of the size of ISIL’s military vary widely from tens of thousands up to 200,000 fighters.[12][478]

Alleged support by the US

Rand Paul, the junior Senator from Kentucky, accused the US government of allying with ISIL in the Syrian Civil War by arming their allies and fighting their enemies in that country.[479][480]

Foreign fighters in Iraq and Syria

There are an estimated 15,000 fighters from nearly 70 countries in ISIL’s ranks, according to a UN report.[481]

Statistics gathered on a nation by nation basis indicate: 7,000 from Saudi Arabia,[482] 2,400–5,000 from Tunisia,[482][483]500–2,000 from the United Kingdom,[484] 1,000 from the Russian Federation, 1,000 from Turkey,[485] 900 from France,[486]550 from Germany,[487] 300 from China,[488] 250–400 from Belgium,[489] 250 from Australia,[490] 150 from Sweden,[491] 140 from Norway,[492] 130 from Canada,[493] 130 from the Netherlands,[494] 100 from the United States,[495] 100 from Denmark,[496] 50 from Finland,[497] 40–50 from Israel,[498] and 40 from Spain.[499]

Weapons

Conventional weapons

ISIL relies mostly on captured weapons. Major sources are Saddam Hussein‘s Iraqi stockpiles from the 2003–11 Iraq insurgency[500] and weapons from government and opposition forces fighting in the Syrian Civil War and during the post-US withdrawal Iraqi insurgency. The captured weapons, including armor, guns, surface-to-air missiles, and even some aircraft, enabled rapid territorial growth and facilitated the capture of additional equipment.[501]

Armored fighting vehicles

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
T-55/55MV/AM/AMV Main battle tank 45+  Soviet Union T-55 4.jpg Multiple captured[181]
T-62M/K Main battle tank 10-15  Soviet Union T-62 BRL.jpg Multiple captured[181]
T-72/72M/A/AV /TURMS-T/M1 TURMS-T Main battle tank 5+  Soviet Union T-72 NPA.JPG Multiple captured[181]
M1A1M Abrams main battle tank Main battle tank 1-5  United States Abrams in Tahrir.jpg Multiple captured from Iraq Army[190]

Non-conventional weapons

The group has a long history of using truck and car bombs, suicide bombers, and IEDs, and has used chemical weapons in Iraq and Syria. ISIL captured nuclear materials from Mosul University in July 2014, but is unlikely to be able to turn them into weapons.[502][503]

 

Propaganda and social media

The logo of al-Hayat Media Center, a near-copy of that of Al Jazeera.

ISIL is known for its extensive and effective use of propaganda.[504][505] It uses a version of the Muslim Black Standard flag and developed an emblem which has clear symbolic meaning in the Muslim world.[506]

In November 2006, shortly after the group’s rebranding as the “Islamic State of Iraq”, the group established the al-Furqan Institute for Media Production, which produces CDs, DVDs, posters, pamphlets, and web-related propaganda products.[507] ISIL’s main media outlet is the I’tisaam Media Foundation,[508] which was formed in March 2013 and distributes through the Global Islamic Media Front(GIMF).[509]

In 2014, ISIL established the al-Hayat Media Center, which targets a Western audience and produces material in English, German, Russian and French.[510][511]Also in 2014, ISIL launched the Ajnad Media Foundation, which releases jihadistaudio chants.[512] In December 2014, FBI Director James Comey stated that ISIL’s “propaganda is unusually slick. They are broadcasting… in something like 23 languages”.[513]

From July 2014, al-Hayat began publishing a digital magazine called Dabiq, in a number of different languages including English. According to the magazine, its name is taken from the town of Dabiq in northern Syria, which is mentioned in ahadith about Armageddon.[514]

ISIL’s use of social media has been described by one expert as “probably more sophisticated than [that of] most US companies”.[504][515] It regularly takes advantage of social media, particularly Twitter, to distribute its message by organizing hashtag campaigns, encouraging Tweets on popular hashtags, and utilizing software applications that enable ISIL propaganda to be distributed to its supporters’ accounts.[516] Another comment is that “ISIS puts more emphasis on social media than other jihadi groups… They have a very coordinated social media presence.”[517] In August 2014, Twitter administrators shut down a number of accounts associated with ISIL. ISIL recreated and publicized new accounts the next day, which were also shut down by Twitter administrators.[518] The group has attempted to branch out into alternative social media sites, such as Quitter, Friendica and Diaspora; Quitter and Friendica, however, almost immediately worked to remove ISIL’s presence from their sites.[519]

In a switch from its former practices, ISIL’s media arm imposed a social media blackout on 27 September 2014, fearing that tweets and posts would give away military positions.[520] ISIL has also attempted to present a more “rational argument” in its series of “press release/discussions” performed by hostage/captive John Cantlie and posted on YouTube. In its most recent “Cantlie presentation”, various current and former US officials were quoted, such as US President Barack Obama and former CIA station chief Michael Scheuer.[521]

Finances

In 2014, the RAND Corporation carried out a study of 200 documents—personal letters, expense reports and membership rosters—that had been captured from Islamic State of Iraq (al-Qaeda in Iraq).[522] It found that from 2005 until 2010, outside donations amounted to only 5% of the group’s operating budgets, with the rest being raised within Iraq.[522] In the time period studied, cells were required to send up to 20% of the income generated from kidnapping, extortion rackets and other activities to the next level of the group’s leadership. Higher-ranking commanders would then redistribute the funds to provincial or local cells that were in difficulties or needed money to conduct attacks.[522] The records show that the Islamic State of Iraq was dependent on members from Mosul for cash, which the leadership used to provide additional funds to struggling militants in Diyala, Salahuddin and Baghdad.[522]

In mid-2014, Iraqi intelligence obtained information from an ISIL operative which revealed that the organization had assets worth US$2 billion,[523] making it the richest jihadist group in the world.[524] About three quarters of this sum is said to be represented by assets seized after the group captured Mosul in June 2014; this includes possibly up to US$429 million looted from Mosul’s central bank, along with additional millions and a large quantity of gold bullion stolen from a number of other banks in Mosul.[525][526] However, doubt was later cast on whether ISIL was able to retrieve anywhere near that sum from the central bank,[527] and even on whether the bank robberies had actually occurred.[528]

Exporting oil from oilfields captured by ISIL brings in tens of millions of dollars.[153][529] One US Treasury official has estimated that ISIL earns US$1 million a day from the export of oil. Much of the oil is sold illegally in Turkey.[530] Dubai-based energy analysts have put the combined oil revenue from ISIL’s Iraqi-Syrian production as high as US$3 million per day.[531] ISIL also extracts wealth through taxation and extortion.[530]

Today the majority of the group’s funding comes from the production and sale of energy. It controls around 300 oil wells in Iraq alone. At its peak, it operated 350 oil wells in Iraq, but lost 45 to foreign airstrikes. It has captured 60% of Syria’s total production capacity. About one fifth of its total capacity is in operation. ISIL earned US$2.5 million a day by selling 50,000–60,000 barrels of oil daily.[530][532] Foreign sales rely on a long-standing black market to export via Turkey. Many of the smugglers and corrupt Turkish border guards who helped Saddam Hussein to evade sanctions are helping ISIL to export oil and import cash.[532][533][534] Energy sales include selling electric power from captured power plants in northern Syria; some of this electricity is reportedly sold back to the Syrian government.[535]

Sales of artifacts may be the second largest source of funding for ISIL, according to an article in Newsweek. More than a third of Iraq’s important sites are under ISIL’s control. It looted the 9th century BC grand palace of the Assyrian kingAshurnasirpal II at Kalhu. Tablets, manuscripts and cuneiforms were sold, worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Stolen artifacts are smuggled into Turkey and Jordan. Abdulamir al-Hamdani, an archaeologist from SUNY Stony Brook, has said that ISIL is “looting… the very roots of humanity, artifacts from the oldest civilizations in the world”.[532]

The group routinely practises extortion, by demanding money from truck drivers and threatening to blow up businesses, for example. Robbing banks and gold shops has been another source of income.[227]

Pictures show damage to the Gbiebe oil refinery in Syria following airstrikes by US and coalition forces.

ISIL is widely reported as receiving funding from private donors in the Gulf states,[536][537] and the governments of Iraq and Iranhave repeatedly accused Saudi Arabia and Qatar of financing and supporting the group. Ahead of the conference of the US-led anti-ISIL coalition held in Paris in September 2014, France’s foreign minister acknowledged that a number of countries at the table had “very probably” financed ISIL’s advances.[538]

Although Iran and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki have accused Saudi Arabia and Qatar of funding the group,[539][540][541][542] there is reportedly no evidence that this is the case.[121][542][543][544] However, according to The Atlantic, ISIL may have been a major part of Saudi Arabian Bandar bin Sultan’s covert-ops strategy in Syria.[545]

Unregistered charity organizations are used as fronts to pass funds to ISIL. As they use aliases on Facebook‘s WhatsApp and Kik, the individuals and organizations are untraceable. Donations transferred to fund ISIL’s operations are disguised as “humanitarian charity”. Saudi Arabia has imposed a blanket ban on unauthorized donations destined for Syria as the only means of stopping such funding.[532]

Since 2012, ISIL has produced annual reports giving numerical information on its operations, somewhat in the style of corporate reports, seemingly in a bid to encourage potential donors.[504][546]

On 11 November 2014, ISIL announced that they intended to mint their own gold, silver and copper coins, based on thecoinage used by the Umayyad Caliphate in the 7th Century. Following the announcement, the group began buying up gold, silver and copper in markets throughout northern and western Iraq, according to precious metal traders in the area. Members of the group also reportedly began stripping the insulation off electrical power cables in order to obtain the copper wiring.[547][548] The announcement included designs of the proposed coins, which displayed imagery including a map of the world, a sword and shield, the Al-Aqsa Mosque, and a crescent moon. Economics experts, such as Professor Steven H. Hanke of Johns Hopkins University, were skeptical of the plans.[548][549] See also Modern gold dinar.

Timeline of recent events

Index to main: 2013 events; 2014 events: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September,October, November, December; 2015 events: January, February.

February 2015