Death, Immolation, and the Inauguration

 By: Twilight Language

Death may be knocking on the doorsteps of Donald Trump’s Inauguration as the 45th President on Friday, January 20, 2017.

It appears to be a time when the unexpected may surprise those who wish to have things so well-ordered and planned.

This was a special week in January 1989 called “Palach Week.” It marked the beginning of the end of Communism in Czechoslovakia, and the Velvet Revolution. There is a powerful documentary made in 2014, Agnieszka Holland’s Burning Bush (image above is from that film) that chronicles those times. The title has many meanings, of course.

Self-immolations have a way of changing the course of history, as the form of protest is so powerful, radical and shocking.

The Burning Bush

Concidentially, another kind of Bush may be important in the midst of this upcoming very political American weekend.

On Wednesday, January 18, 2017, the 41st President George H. W. Bush was admitted to the intensive care unit at Houston Methodist Hospital to address an acute respiratory problem stemming from pneumonia. Bush underwent a procedure to clear his air passages. His wife Barbara, furthermore, was hospitalized as a precaution.

The 36th President Lyndon Baines Johnson died on January 22, 1973, two days after Richard Nixon was sworn in for this 2nd term. Johnson’s death disrupted Nixon’s “celebration” of the start of what would be his shortened term, and LBJ’s state funeral was held on January 25, 1973.
In an era of wall-to-wall media, the death of George H. W. Bush would be an auspicious beginning for Trump’s first term.
Immolations 2017
Two reports of self-immolations (suicides by fire) in which both people lived surfaced yesterday. One is directly related to Trump’s assuming power.
On Tuesday night, January 17, 2017, a man set himself on fire outside the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C.
DC Fire and EMS received a call at 9:23 p.m. about an individual trying to place himself on fire.
“We did arrive and did find a male adult with burns and we transported that patient to an area hospital with potential but not life-threatening burns,” DC Fire and EMS Department spokesman Vito Maggiolo told CNN Wednesday. The man attempted to start the small blaze outside the Trump hotel but was burned badly in the process and taken to a hospital for treatment.

The 45-year-old man, who has not yet been identified, said the act was in protest of the President-elect’s looming inauguration, Daily Mail reports said.

Witnesses described how he yelled ‘Trump’ several times as ‘flames ran up his back’ before lying down in the street.

Also on Tuesday night, January 17, 2017, another self-immolation occurred, this one in Nashua, New Hampshire. The Union Leader reported:

Officials said a pair of passers-by came to the aid of a man who tried to immolate himself in a city parking lot Tuesday night, using jackets and snow from the ground to put out the fire.

Police and fire said they received the report of the unidentified man on fire just before 10:30 p.m. in the parking lot of the Headlines store at 37 East Hollis St.

According to a press release from the Nashua Fire Department, the man had just purchased gasoline from a nearby gas station, poured it over his head and ignited himself.

The Fire Department said the man suffered burns over at least 20 percent of his upper torso, but was conscious and breathing. He was taken to Southern New Hampshire Medical Center.

January 1969

In my book Suicide Clusters (NY: Simon and Schuster, 1987), I revisited how Prague and immolations were keys in overturning Communism. Here is my summary from a later work.

Jan Palach, a student at Charles University in Prague, startled passersby by pouring a liquid over his body at about 3 P.M. on January 16, 1969, and then setting himself ablaze. The twenty‑one‑year‑old student chose the statue of Wenceslas, the Czech hero saint, as the site of his protest in Prague. Palach had left a note declaring that he belonged to a group whose members planned to self‑incinerate themselves, one every ten days, until the Soviet troops departed. Palach’s protest and death three days later got worldwide media coverage with others following his lead.

On January 20, 1969, crowds of people waving the Czechoslovak state flags, black flags and enlarged photographs of Jan Palach, gathered at the spot of Palach’s suicide. In the Philosophical Faculty building, the clocks were stopped so they showed the exact time of Palach’s death (3:15 P.M.). Josef Hlavaty then self-immolated himself just as Palach had. Two days later, on January 22, Miroslav Malinka killed himself through suicide by fire, and Blanka Nachazelova suffocated herself with coal gas. On the day of the Palach funeral, Hlavaty died.

In the next well-publicized suicide, Jan Zajic, an 18-year-old student at a vocational school in Sumperk, set himself on fire on February 25, 1969. Before his death, he gave his friends a poem about Palach and four letters, in which he described himself as “Torch no. 2.” He did it in Prague in the passageway of a building on Wenceslas Square, as he was trying to run to the statute, but he fell in flames and died there. He said he decided to immolate himself after seeing that life was returning to its old routine despite Palach’s action.

On April 4, 1969, in another square, this time in the southeastern Bohemian city of Jihlava, Evzen Plocek, 40, set himself on fire. At least 26 people attempted suicide between January 20 and the end of April 1969, with at least seven of these dying by fire in Czechoslovakia, Scotland, and Hungary after Palach’s death. Reports of seven other fatal self-immolations came from India, Pakistan, England, and the United States. ~ The Copycat Effect, (NY: New York, 2004).

Self-immolations, exactly 20 years later, in 1989, set off the overthrow of the Iron Curtain throughout the Eastern Block.

The self-immolations in the Arab Spring changed the political landscape, once again.

++++
“Hold on—that’s a trash fire. Over there is Trump’s Inauguration speech.”
The above (by coincidence) is The New Yorker’s Daily Cartoon (by Tom Toro) for January 18, 2017.
Update:
 
During a live report on [January 19, 2017’s] Thursday’s “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on the Fox News Channel, a young man protesting in Washington, DC claimed to have started a fire in the street, “Because I felt like it. And because I’m just saying, ‘Screw our president.’”

Obama related to Bush, Brad Pitt, Churchill

My Obama-mania grows with revelations from the New England Geneological Society that Obama is related to atleast 6 different Presidents and even Brad Pitt! The NEGS released family trees of all the presidential candidates. Their major findings are as follows:

Obama: George W. Bush, his father George H.W. Bush, Gerald Ford, Lyndon Johnson, Harry Truman, James Madiso, Winston Churchill, Brad Pitt, Dick Cheney, Robert Lee

Clinton: Camilla Parker-Bowles, Madonna, Angelina Jolie among the notable ones.

McCain: Laura Bush

Obama leads again in this count of “super”(dead) delegates!!!

Here is how Obama is related to Bush. Notice the similarity in their coats…

List of presidents

 The last 7 Presidents in 42 Years Reveals 7 Headed Beast That Rules 42 Months in Revelation!

Two Presidents Have Died on December 26th

https://zeitgeist77.wordpress.com/2015/01/09/two-presidents-have-died-on-december-26th/

President Took office Left office Party Term
[n 1]
Previous office Vice President
1 George Washington
(1732–1799)
[11][12][13]
April 30, 1789
[n 2]
March 4, 1797 n/a[14] 1
(1789)
Commander-in-Chiefof the Continental Army
(1775–1783)
John Adams
2
(1792)
2 John Adams
(1735–1826)
[15][16][17]
March 4, 1797 March 4, 1801
[n 3]
Federalist 3
(1796)
Vice President Thomas Jefferson
3 Thomas Jefferson
(1743–1826)
[18][19][20]
March 4, 1801 March 4, 1809 Democratic-
Republican
4
(1800)
Vice President Aaron Burr
March 4, 1801March 4, 1805
5
(1804)
George Clinton[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1805April 20, 1812
4 James Madison
(1751–1836)
[21][22][23]
March 4, 1809 March 4, 1817 Democratic-
Republican
6
(1808)
Secretary of State
(1801–1809)
Vacant[n 6]
April 20, 1812March 4, 1813
7
(1812)
Elbridge Gerry[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1813November 23, 1814
Vacant[n 6]
November 23, 1814March 4, 1817
5 James Monroe
(1758–1831)
[24][25][26]
March 4, 1817 March 4, 1825 Democratic-
Republican
8
(1816)
Secretary of State
(1811–1817)
Daniel D. Tompkins
9
(1820)
6 John Quincy Adams
(1767–1848)
[27][28][29]
March 4, 1825 March 4, 1829
[n 3]
Democratic-
Republican
10
(1824)
Secretary of State
(1817–1825)
John C. Calhoun[n 7]
March 4, 1825December 28, 1832
7 Andrew Jackson
(1767–1845)
[30][31][32]
March 4, 1829 March 4, 1837 Democratic 11
(1828)
U.S. Senator from Tennessee
(1823–1825)
Vacant[n 6]
December 28, 1832March 4, 1833
12
(1832)
Martin Van Buren
March 4, 1833March 4, 1837
8 Martin Van Buren
(1782–1862)
[33][34][35]
March 4, 1837 March 4, 1841
[n 3]
Democratic 13
(1836)
Vice President Richard Mentor Johnson
9 William Henry Harrison
(1773–1841)
[36][37][38]
March 4, 1841 April 4, 1841
[n 5][n 4]
Whig 14
(1840)
Minister to Colombia
(1828–1829)
John Tyler
10 John Tyler
(1790–1862)
[39][40][41]
April 4, 1841 March 4, 1845 Whig
April 4, 1841September 13, 1841
Vice President
[n 8]
Vacant[n 6]
Independent[n 9]
September 13, 1841March 4, 1845
11 James K. Polk
(1795–1849)
[42][43][44]
March 4, 1845 March 4, 1849 Democratic 15
(1844)
Governor of Tennessee
(1839–1841)
George M. Dallas
12 Zachary Taylor
(1784–1850)
[45][46][47]
March 4, 1849 July 9, 1850
[n 5][n 4]
Whig 16
(1848)
U.S. Army Major generalfrom the 1st Infantry Regiment
(1846–1849)
Millard Fillmore
13 Millard Fillmore
(1800–1874)
[48][49][50]
July 9, 1850 March 4, 1853
[n 10]
Whig Vice President Vacant[n 6]
14 Franklin Pierce
(1804–1869)
[51][52][53]
March 4, 1853 March 4, 1857 Democratic 17
(1852)
U.S. Army Brigadier generalfrom the 9th Infantry Regiment
(1847–1848)
William R. King[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1853April 18, 1853
Vacant[n 6]
April 18, 1853March 4, 1857
15 James Buchanan
(1791–1868)
[54][55][56]
March 4, 1857 March 4, 1861 Democratic 18
(1856)
Minister to the United Kingdom
(1853–1856)
John C. Breckinridge
16 Abraham Lincoln
(1809–1865)
[57][58][59]
March 4, 1861 April 15, 1865
[n 5][n 11]
Republican 19
(1860)
U.S. Representativefrom Illinois
(1847–1849)
Hannibal Hamlin
March 4, 1861March 4, 1865
Republican
National Union[n 12]
20
(1864)
Andrew Johnson
March 4, 1865April 15, 1865
17 Andrew Johnson
(1808–1875)
[60][61][62]
April 15, 1865 March 4, 1869 Democratic
National Union[n 12]
Independent[n 13]
Vice President Vacant
[n 6]
18 Ulysses S. Grant
(1822–1885)
[63][64][65]
March 4, 1869 March 4, 1877 Republican 21
(1868)
Commanding Generalof the U.S. Army
(1864–1869)
Schuyler Colfax
March 4, 1869March 4, 1873
22
(1872)
Henry Wilson[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1873November 22, 1875
Vacant[n 6]
November 22, 1875March 4, 1877
19 Rutherford B. Hayes
(1822–1893)
[66][67][68]
March 4, 1877 March 4, 1881 Republican 23
(1876)
Governor of Ohio
(1868–1872, 1876–1877)
William A. Wheeler
20 James A. Garfield
(1831–1881)
[69][70][71]
March 4, 1881 September 19, 1881
[n 5][n 11]
Republican 24
(1880)
U.S. Representative from Ohio
(1863–1881)
Chester A. Arthur
21 Chester A. Arthur
(1829–1886)
[72][73][74]
September 19, 1881 March 4, 1885 Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
22 Grover Cleveland
(1837–1908)
[75][76]
March 4, 1885 March 4, 1889
[n 3]
Democratic 25
(1884)
Governor of New York
(1883–1885)
Thomas A. Hendricks[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1885November 25, 1885
Vacant[n 6]
November 25, 1885March 4, 1889
23 Benjamin Harrison
(1833–1901)
[77][78][79]
March 4, 1889 March 4, 1893
[n 3]
Republican 26
(1888)
U.S. Senator from Indiana
(1881–1887)
Levi P. Morton
24 Grover Cleveland
(1837–1908)
[75][76]
March 4, 1893 March 4, 1897 Democratic 27
(1892)
President
(1885–1889)
Adlai Stevenson
25 William McKinley
(1843–1901)
[80][81][82]
March 4, 1897 September 14, 1901
[n 5][n 11]
Republican 28
(1896)
Governor of Ohio
(1892–1896)
Garret Hobart[n 4]
March 4, 1897November 21, 1899
Vacant[n 6]
November 21, 1899March 4, 1901
29
(1900)
Theodore Roosevelt
March 4, 1901September 14, 1901
26 Theodore Roosevelt
(1858–1919)
[83][84][85]
September 14, 1901 March 4, 1909
[n 10]
Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
September 14, 1901March 4, 1905
30
(1904)
Charles W. Fairbanks
March 4, 1905March 4, 1909
27 William Howard Taft
(1857–1930)
[86][87][88]
March 4, 1909 March 4, 1913
[n 3]
Republican 31
(1908)
Secretary of War
(1904–1908)
James S. Sherman[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1909October 30, 1912
Vacant[n 6]
October 30, 1912March 4, 1913
28 Woodrow Wilson
(1856–1924)
[89][90][91]
March 4, 1913 March 4, 1921 Democratic 32
(1912)
Governor of New Jersey
(1911–1913)
Thomas R. Marshall
33
(1916)
29 Warren G. Harding
(1865–1923)
[92][93][94]
March 4, 1921 August 2, 1923
[n 5][n 4]
Republican 34
(1920)
U.S. Senator from Ohio
(1915–1921)
Calvin Coolidge
30 Calvin Coolidge
(1872–1933)
[95][96][97]
August 2, 1923 March 4, 1929 Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
August 2, 1923March 4, 1925
35
(1924)
Charles G. Dawes
March 4, 1925March 4, 1929
31 Herbert Hoover
(1874–1964)
[98][99][100]
March 4, 1929 March 4, 1933
[n 3]
Republican 36
(1928)
Secretary of Commerce
(1921–1928)
Charles Curtis
32 Franklin D. Roosevelt
(1882–1945)
[101][102][103]
March 4, 1933 April 12, 1945
[n 5][n 4]
Democratic 37
(1932)
[n 14]
Governor of New York
(1929–1932)
John Nance Garner
March 4, 1933January 20, 1941
38
(1936)
39
(1940)
Henry A. Wallace
January 20, 1941January 20, 1945
40
(1944)
Harry S. Truman
January 20, 1945April 12, 1945
33 Harry S. Truman
(1884–1972)
[104][105][106]
April 12, 1945 January 20, 1953 Democratic Vice President Vacant[n 6]
April 12, 1945January 20, 1949
41
(1948)
Alben W. Barkley
January 20, 1949January 20, 1953
34 Dwight D. Eisenhower
(1890–1969)
[107][108][109]
January 20, 1953 January 20, 1961
[n 15]
Republican 42
(1952)
Supreme Allied Commander Europe
(1949–1952)
Richard Nixon
43
(1956)
35 John F. Kennedy
(1917–1963)
[110][111][112]
January 20, 1961 November 22, 1963
[n 5][n 11]
Democratic 44
(1960)
U.S. Senatorfrom Massachusetts
(1953–1960)
Lyndon B. Johnson
36 Lyndon B. Johnson
(1908–1973)
[113][114]
November 22, 1963 January 20, 1969 Democratic Vice President Vacant[n 6]
November 22, 1963January 20, 1965
45
(1964)
Hubert Humphrey
January 20, 1965January 20, 1969
37 Richard Nixon
(1913–1994)
[115][116][117]
January 20, 1969 August 9, 1974
[n 7]
Republican 46
(1968)
Vice President
(1953–1961)
Spiro Agnew[n 7]
January 20, 1969October 10, 1973
47
(1972)
Vacant[n 6]
October 10, 1973December 6, 1973
Gerald Ford
December 6, 1973August 9, 1974
38 Gerald Ford
(1913–2006)
[118][119][120]
August 9, 1974 January 20, 1977
[n 16]
Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
August 9, 1974December 19, 1974
Nelson Rockefeller
December 19, 1974January 20, 1977
39 Jimmy Carter
(born 1924)
[121][122][123]
January 20, 1977 January 20, 1981
[n 3]
Democratic 48
(1976)
Governor of Georgia
(1971–1975)
Walter Mondale
40 Ronald Reagan
(1911–2004)
[124][125][126]
January 20, 1981 January 20, 1989 Republican 49
(1980)
Governor of California
(1967–1975)
George H. W. Bush
50
(1984)
41 George H. W. Bush
(born 1924)
[127][128][129]
January 20, 1989 January 20, 1993
[n 3]
Republican 51
(1988)
Vice President Dan Quayle
42 Bill Clinton
(born 1946)
[130][131][132]
January 20, 1993 January 20, 2001 Democratic 52
(1992)
Governor of Arkansas
(1979–1981, 1983–1992)
Al Gore
53
(1996)
43 George W. Bush
(born 1946)
[133][134][135]
January 20, 2001 January 20, 2009 Republican 54
(2000)
Governor of Texas
(1995–2000)
Dick Cheney
55
(2004)
44 Barack Obama
(born 1961)
[136][137][138]
January 20, 2009 Incumbent Democratic 56
(2008)
U.S. Senator from Illinois
(2005–2008)
Joe Biden
57
(2012)

Living former presidents

As of January 2015, there are four living former presidents:

President Term of office Date of birth
Jimmy Carter 1977–1981 October 1, 1924 (age 90)
George H. W. Bush 1989–1993 June 12, 1924 (age 90)
Bill Clinton 1993–2001 August 19, 1946 (age 68)
George W. Bush 2001–2009 July 6, 1946 (age 68)

Two Presidents Have Died on December 26th

by: Twilight Language

This is a dangerous time of year for American Presidents.

Former President George H.W. Bush remained at a Houston hospital for a third day in a row on Christmas Day 2014, after experiencing shortness of breath earlier this week.
Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the 33rd President of the United States (1945–53).
Gerald Rudolph “Jerry” Ford, Jr. (born Leslie Lynch King, Jr.; July 14, 1913 – December 26, 2006) was the 38th President of the United States, serving from 1974 to 1977, and, prior to this, was the 40th Vice President of the United States serving from 1973 to 1974 under President Richard Nixon.Gerald Ford died on December 26, 2006 at 6:45 PM, the latest in the calendar year a president has died. Harry Truman also died on December 26 (exactly 34 years earlier, in 1972); he died earlier in the day, at 7:47AM.December 26, 1799, was the date for George Washington’s funeral. Four thousand people attended George Washington’s funeral where Henry Lee III declared him as “first in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

Washington had died at his Mt. Vernon, Virginia home around 10 p.m. or 11 p.m. (reports vary) on Saturday, December 14, 1799, aged 67. His corpse was measured and he was found to be 6 feet 3.5 inches tall.

John Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died on July 4, 1826, the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. James Monroe in 1831 and John Adams and Thomas Jefferson in 1826 all died on July 4.

Millard Fillmore in 1874 and William Howard Taft in 1930 both died on March 8.

George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) is an American retired politician who served as the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993).

In this November 17, 2013 photograph, former President George H.W. Bush, who turned 90 in 2014, sits on the sidelines before a game between the Houston Texans and Oakland Raiders, in Houston, Texas.

Other notable December 26th events:

On December 26, 1811, a theater fire in Richmond, Virginia killed the Governor of Virginia George William Smith and the president of the First National Bank of Virginia Abraham B. Venable.

On December 26, 1862, the largest mass-hanging in U.S. history took place in Mankato, Minnesota, 38 Native Americans died.

On December 26, 1977, Howard Hawks, American director and screenwriter (b. 1896) died.Louis Whitley Strieber (born June 13, 1945, San Antonio, Texas) asserts that he was abducted from his cabin in upstate New York on the evening of December 26, 1985 by non-human beings. He wrote about this experience and related experiences in Communion (1987), his first non-fiction book. Although the book is perceived generally as an account of alien abduction, Strieber draws no conclusions about the identity of alleged abductors. He refers to the beings as “the visitors,” a name chosen to be as neutral as possible to entertain the possibility that they are not extraterrestrials and may instead exist in his mind.

The following Strieber books have been adapted into movies:
Wolfen (1981; Orion/Warner Bros.),
The Hunger (1983; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer), and
Communion (1989; New Line Cinema).

In the Communion, Christopher Walken plays Whitley Strieber and Lindsay Crouse plays Anne Strieber. The film’s score is by Eric Clapton. The movie is directed by Philippe Mora.

The Hunger is directed by Tony Scott, Ridley Scott’s brother who jumped from a bridge to his death. (See “Tony Scott: Divine Sacrifice of the King.”)

On December 26, 1986, Elsa Lanchester, English-American actress and singer (b. 1902) died. She is best remembered for her dual roles of Mary Shelley and the Monster’s Bride, in Bride of Frankenstein(1935).