Earthquake

1  Ancient Greece was not the birthplace of democracy. Two thousand years earlier in the kingdom of Ebla, located in what is now Syria, kings were elected for seven-year terms.

2  Humans are not the only ones that vote. When it is time to find a new hive,honeybees vote for the best location, even though they can’t count. After scouts return from casing possible sites, they dance. The bees that dance most vigorously will recruit other scouts until one site wins.

3  Divining the human decision-making process is tougher. The first election poll in the United States was conducted in 1824 by the Harrisburg Pennsylvanian newspaper. It accurately predicted that Andrew Jackson would win the most votes in the presidential race, but…

 

4  …unfortunately, the poll didn’t predict the winner, because Jackson didn’t get enough votes in the electoral college. The House of Representatives gave the presidency to John Quincy Adams.

5  On election night in 1952, TV viewers saw Walter Cron¬kite sitting beside UNIVAC 1, which famously called the race for Eisenhower after only 7 percent of the vote had been tallied.

6  Not quite. Cronkite sat beside a cardboard panel with blinking Christmas lights. The real computer was projecting returns in Pennsylvania.

7  In 2007 neuroscientists examined the brain activity of undecided voters as they viewed the leading presidential candidates in the race.

8  The two candidates who elicited the least amount of activity? John McCain and Barack Obama.

9  Belgium, with compulsory voting, punishes those who have missed four elections in 15 years by…not letting them vote for 10 years. Are we missing something here?

10  Think that’s confusing? Consider the Venetians. For more than 500 years the doge of Venice was selected by 30 members of the Great Council who were chosen by lot, who were then reduced by lot to 9, who then chose 40, who were then reduced by lot to 12…

11  …who then chose 25, who were reduced by lot to 9, who then elected 45, who were reduced by lot to 11…

12  …who then chose the 41 who (gasp!) finally elected the doge. We are assured by researchers that this actually worked reasonably well in avoiding corruption and the influence of special interests.

13  The lever voting machine [pdf] was invented by Jacob H. Myers and was first used in 1892 in Lockport, New York. Myers said it was designed to “make the process of casting the ballot perfectly plain, simple, and secret.”

14  At the time, the machine had more moving parts than nearly any other contraption in the United States.

15  It’s not getting any simpler. The Swiss used quantum physics to help safeguard a 2007 election. The keys to encrypted electronic voting returns were transmitted using polarized photons.

16  For the 2006 elections, the Department of Defense launched a Web-based voting system for overseas military personnel and American expatriates. The system cost more than $830,000; 63 people used it to vote.

17  Ballot layout matters. There’s the “vertical proximity effect,” whereby unknown candidates whose names appear near those of popular candidates get extra votes.

18  And then there’s a tendency among voters simply to vote for the first name on the ballot. In Australia, where voting is compulsory, these votes could account for as much as 1 percent of the total.

19  Rain can tilt elections. Between 1948 and 2000, for every inch of rain on Election Day in a given county, there was an average 0.8 percent decline in turnout.

20  Computer modeling has indicated that if it had rained in Illinois in 1960, Nixon would have beaten Kennedy—and if it had been sunny in Florida in 2000, Gore would have beaten Bush.

 

The Charleston Massacre and the Name Game

By: twilight language

The name game and twilight language have been visible to readers of this blog for years. In the wake of the June 17, 2015, killing of nine in Charleston, South Carolina, the rest of the world seems to have been awakened to the symbols in their midst.

Dylann Storm Roof is the root of this awareness, in many ways, due to his overwhelming employment of overt items like the Confederate flags, Nazi-employed numbers (14, 88, 1488), and even the Othala rune.

 

Roof was apprehended on June 18, 2015, after a motorist spotted his black Hyundai Elantra, which displays an apartheid “Confederate States of America” license plate on the front bumper, while driving near Shelby, North Carolina.

On June 24, 2015, in a flash fire across the South, of breaking news alerts, one state after another, one business after another, talked of removing Confederate flags, directly due to them being used as symbols of racist and hate.

Dylann Storm Roof, alleged Charleston gunman
Adam Lanza, Newtown gunman
James Holmes, Aurora gunman
Jared Loughner, Tuscon gunman
Nidal Hasan, Fort Hood gunman

Symbols. Eyes of hate. Now names too are being mined for significance in the aftermath of the massacre. We have mentioned the names of streets for a long time. Now others are noticing, and it is enlightening to see how far afield this is going.

John C. Calhoun, 1849

In all the news coverage of the shooting at Emanuel AME Church, it’s rarely been mentioned* that it’s located at 110 Calhoun, a street named after John C. Calhoun.
That’s right: family members of those killed have to go to memorial services at Emanuel AME and look at street signs honoring one of the most rabid supporters of slavery in American history.
Calhoun was vice president from 1825 to 1832, during the administrations of John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson, and then became a powerful U.S. senator from South Carolina. Calhoun himself owned a plantation and lots of people. He pushed not just for the preservation of slavery but its expansion into new territories to the west. And he was a major advocate of 1850’s Fugitive Slave Act. Source.

The whole South is the grave of Calhoun. ”
— Yankee Soldier (1865)

*”Rarely mentioned”: In actual fact, several news sites have mentioned the address and talked about the unfortunate reality of the address for the Mother Emanuel Church being on Calhoun Street.

The examination of the use of the name even spread to a debate regarding Lake Calhoun in Minnesota, noted on June 23, 2015, in the Star-Tribune.

The perennial question of renaming Lake Calhoun has been revived with a new directive to Park Board staff to look into the issue again as an online petition against the name topped 1,700 signatures.
Park Board President Liz Wielinski announced at a special board meeting Monday that staff had been directed to report back to the board by its first September meeting on the issue on the naming process….
The petition was launched by Mike Spangenberg of Minneapolis after last week’s killings of nine people at a Charleston, S.C., church, He said the petition represents confronting the nation’s past and addressing systemic racism. Park Commissioner Brad Bourn also has advocated for a name change.
During his 30 years on the national stage as a lawmaker, vice president and secretary of war, John C. Calhoun argued that slavery was a positive good for those enslaved, and espoused such states rights doctrines as the ability of a state to nullify federal acts with which it disagreed.
His tie to the area now known as Minneapolis comes from his action as secretary of war to President James Monroe to establish Fort Snelling at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers. Source.

Calhoun is also linked to an early “going postal” event. On December 2, 1983, in Calhoun County, Alabama, James Brooks, 53, entered the Anniston, Alabama, post office with a .38 caliber pistol, killing the postmaster, and injuring his immediate supervisor. Subsequent to killing the postmaster, James Brooks ran up the stairs of the building pursuing his supervisor and shooting him twice.

Meanwhile, the bust of a Confederate general and leading figure in the early days of the Ku Klux Klan – Nathan Bedford Forrest – was being being proposed to be removed from the Tennessee statehouse, top Tennessee Democrats and the state Republican Party chairman said on June 23rd.

Some of the discussion has been extreme, such as CNN anchor Ashleigh Banfield questioning whether the Jefferson Memorial should be taken down because Jefferson owned slaves. “There is a monument to him in the capital city of the United States. No one ever asks for that to come down,” Banfield said.

Infowars blogger Paul Joseph Watson compared taking down the Jefferson Memorial to the logic of Islamic State terrorists “who have spent the last year tearing down historical statues and monuments because they offend their radical belief system.”

Anything taken out of context can be questioned. George Washington, Andrew Jackson and James Madison also owned slaves.

At the University of Texas, Austin, a public statue of Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederacy, was reportedly vandalized this week with the words “Black Lives Matter” and “Bump the Chumps.” Another Davis statue at the Statehouse in Frankfort, Ky., has come under scrutiny, with some calling for the work of art to be taken down.
One of those advocating for its removal is Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin, who was quoted in the Hill newspaper as saying, “It is important never to forget our history, but parts of our history are more appropriately displayed in museums, not on government property.”
Statues on the Austin campus of Robert E. Lee, who commanded the Confederate army, and Albert Sidney Johnston, a Confederate general who died during the Civil War, were also vandalized in recent days, according to reports. Source.

Are Jefferson, Madison, Forrest, and Lee some of the names we need to follow? Why haven’t we paid more attention to Calhoun?

The idea of the “name game” became very formalized with “the Fayette Factor?” It was first discovered by researcher William (Bill) Grimstad (a/k/a Jim Brandon), back in 1977, and written about in “Fateful Fayette,” Fortean Times, No. 25, Spring 1978.

Since Grimstad’s discovery, several items on this lexilink between Fayette (as well as its related forms – Lafayette, La Fayette, Fayetteville, Lafayetteville) and high strangeness have been published. In his book, Weird America (New York: EP Dutton, 1978), Grimstad mentions several “power name” hot spots but did not dwell on them.

Concurrently, I was writing of other name games. In 1978, I wrote and had published afterward, inFortean Times, no. 29, Summer 1979, my “Devil Names and Fortean Places.”

The Rebirth of Pan (1st edition, Firebird Press, 1983)
 
Mysterious America (1st edition, Faber & Faber, 1983).

In exchanges with Bill, a small group of Forteans discussed the Fayette Factor and name game privately throughout the late 1970s. It was not until Grimstad’s (now extremely rare) The Rebirth of Pan: Hidden Faces of the American Earth Spirit (Firebird Press, 1983) and Mysterious America(Boston: Faber and Faber, 1983) that more in-depth analyses of the name game “coincidences” seriously occurred. These examinations were followed by updates and other comments in Mysterious America (NY: Simon and Schuster, 2006), and another book of mine (NY: Paraview, 2002). Furthermore, the appearance of widely available material on the name game (including from John A. Keel) started routinely being posted online during the 1990s-2010s, including in this blog.

 

The idea was to raise awareness for the “twilight language” behind names – for example of the town you lived in, the street on which you lived, and those names heard on the news.

In The Rebirth of Pan: Hidden Faces of the American Earth Spirit, Grimstad writes, regarding the “name game”:

I’m not talking here of such spooky tongue-twisters as H.P. Lovecraft’s Yog-Sothoth or Arthur Machen’s Ishakshar, but of quite ordinary names like Bell, Beall and variants, Crowley, Francis, Grafton, Grubb, Magee/McGee, Mason, McKinney, Montpelier, Parsons, Pike, Shelby, Vernon, Watson/Watt, Williams/Williamson. I have others on file, but these are the ones which I have accumulated the most instances.

In my 1983 Mysterious America, I wrote:

Cryptologic or coincidence? Jim Brandon [Bill Grimstad] should be credited with calling attention to the name Watts/Watkins/Watson, and its entanglement with inexplicable things. Some other names involved in mysterious events pinpointed by Brandon are Bell, Mason, Parsons, Pike, Vernon, and Warren. The influence of such names as Mason, Pike, Warren, and Lafayette, for example, issues, in some cryptopolitical and occult way, from their ties to the Masonic tradition.

One of the missions of the abolitionist and Freemason John Brown during his raid of Harper’s Ferry, was the capturing of a Masonic sword. In 1859 he led a raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry. During the raid, he seized the armory; seven people were killed, and ten or more were injured. He intended to arm slaves with weapons from the arsenal, but the attack failed. Within 36 hours, Brown’s men had fled or been killed or captured by local pro-slavery farmers, militiamen, and U.S. Marines led by Robert E. Lee.

A concentration of attention in the past has been on the names of the Founding Fathers and their friends – Washington and Lafayette coming to the top of the list. Other names from the 1812 era, for example, like Stephen Decatur, surface too (see here).
Perhaps some attention will now be given to Civil War and Confederate names – like Calhoun, Albert Pike, and others – in the “name game.”

List of presidents

 The last 7 Presidents in 42 Years Reveals 7 Headed Beast That Rules 42 Months in Revelation!

Two Presidents Have Died on December 26th

https://zeitgeist77.wordpress.com/2015/01/09/two-presidents-have-died-on-december-26th/

President Took office Left office Party Term
[n 1]
Previous office Vice President
1 George Washington
(1732–1799)
[11][12][13]
April 30, 1789
[n 2]
March 4, 1797 n/a[14] 1
(1789)
Commander-in-Chiefof the Continental Army
(1775–1783)
John Adams
2
(1792)
2 John Adams
(1735–1826)
[15][16][17]
March 4, 1797 March 4, 1801
[n 3]
Federalist 3
(1796)
Vice President Thomas Jefferson
3 Thomas Jefferson
(1743–1826)
[18][19][20]
March 4, 1801 March 4, 1809 Democratic-
Republican
4
(1800)
Vice President Aaron Burr
March 4, 1801March 4, 1805
5
(1804)
George Clinton[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1805April 20, 1812
4 James Madison
(1751–1836)
[21][22][23]
March 4, 1809 March 4, 1817 Democratic-
Republican
6
(1808)
Secretary of State
(1801–1809)
Vacant[n 6]
April 20, 1812March 4, 1813
7
(1812)
Elbridge Gerry[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1813November 23, 1814
Vacant[n 6]
November 23, 1814March 4, 1817
5 James Monroe
(1758–1831)
[24][25][26]
March 4, 1817 March 4, 1825 Democratic-
Republican
8
(1816)
Secretary of State
(1811–1817)
Daniel D. Tompkins
9
(1820)
6 John Quincy Adams
(1767–1848)
[27][28][29]
March 4, 1825 March 4, 1829
[n 3]
Democratic-
Republican
10
(1824)
Secretary of State
(1817–1825)
John C. Calhoun[n 7]
March 4, 1825December 28, 1832
7 Andrew Jackson
(1767–1845)
[30][31][32]
March 4, 1829 March 4, 1837 Democratic 11
(1828)
U.S. Senator from Tennessee
(1823–1825)
Vacant[n 6]
December 28, 1832March 4, 1833
12
(1832)
Martin Van Buren
March 4, 1833March 4, 1837
8 Martin Van Buren
(1782–1862)
[33][34][35]
March 4, 1837 March 4, 1841
[n 3]
Democratic 13
(1836)
Vice President Richard Mentor Johnson
9 William Henry Harrison
(1773–1841)
[36][37][38]
March 4, 1841 April 4, 1841
[n 5][n 4]
Whig 14
(1840)
Minister to Colombia
(1828–1829)
John Tyler
10 John Tyler
(1790–1862)
[39][40][41]
April 4, 1841 March 4, 1845 Whig
April 4, 1841September 13, 1841
Vice President
[n 8]
Vacant[n 6]
Independent[n 9]
September 13, 1841March 4, 1845
11 James K. Polk
(1795–1849)
[42][43][44]
March 4, 1845 March 4, 1849 Democratic 15
(1844)
Governor of Tennessee
(1839–1841)
George M. Dallas
12 Zachary Taylor
(1784–1850)
[45][46][47]
March 4, 1849 July 9, 1850
[n 5][n 4]
Whig 16
(1848)
U.S. Army Major generalfrom the 1st Infantry Regiment
(1846–1849)
Millard Fillmore
13 Millard Fillmore
(1800–1874)
[48][49][50]
July 9, 1850 March 4, 1853
[n 10]
Whig Vice President Vacant[n 6]
14 Franklin Pierce
(1804–1869)
[51][52][53]
March 4, 1853 March 4, 1857 Democratic 17
(1852)
U.S. Army Brigadier generalfrom the 9th Infantry Regiment
(1847–1848)
William R. King[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1853April 18, 1853
Vacant[n 6]
April 18, 1853March 4, 1857
15 James Buchanan
(1791–1868)
[54][55][56]
March 4, 1857 March 4, 1861 Democratic 18
(1856)
Minister to the United Kingdom
(1853–1856)
John C. Breckinridge
16 Abraham Lincoln
(1809–1865)
[57][58][59]
March 4, 1861 April 15, 1865
[n 5][n 11]
Republican 19
(1860)
U.S. Representativefrom Illinois
(1847–1849)
Hannibal Hamlin
March 4, 1861March 4, 1865
Republican
National Union[n 12]
20
(1864)
Andrew Johnson
March 4, 1865April 15, 1865
17 Andrew Johnson
(1808–1875)
[60][61][62]
April 15, 1865 March 4, 1869 Democratic
National Union[n 12]
Independent[n 13]
Vice President Vacant
[n 6]
18 Ulysses S. Grant
(1822–1885)
[63][64][65]
March 4, 1869 March 4, 1877 Republican 21
(1868)
Commanding Generalof the U.S. Army
(1864–1869)
Schuyler Colfax
March 4, 1869March 4, 1873
22
(1872)
Henry Wilson[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1873November 22, 1875
Vacant[n 6]
November 22, 1875March 4, 1877
19 Rutherford B. Hayes
(1822–1893)
[66][67][68]
March 4, 1877 March 4, 1881 Republican 23
(1876)
Governor of Ohio
(1868–1872, 1876–1877)
William A. Wheeler
20 James A. Garfield
(1831–1881)
[69][70][71]
March 4, 1881 September 19, 1881
[n 5][n 11]
Republican 24
(1880)
U.S. Representative from Ohio
(1863–1881)
Chester A. Arthur
21 Chester A. Arthur
(1829–1886)
[72][73][74]
September 19, 1881 March 4, 1885 Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
22 Grover Cleveland
(1837–1908)
[75][76]
March 4, 1885 March 4, 1889
[n 3]
Democratic 25
(1884)
Governor of New York
(1883–1885)
Thomas A. Hendricks[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1885November 25, 1885
Vacant[n 6]
November 25, 1885March 4, 1889
23 Benjamin Harrison
(1833–1901)
[77][78][79]
March 4, 1889 March 4, 1893
[n 3]
Republican 26
(1888)
U.S. Senator from Indiana
(1881–1887)
Levi P. Morton
24 Grover Cleveland
(1837–1908)
[75][76]
March 4, 1893 March 4, 1897 Democratic 27
(1892)
President
(1885–1889)
Adlai Stevenson
25 William McKinley
(1843–1901)
[80][81][82]
March 4, 1897 September 14, 1901
[n 5][n 11]
Republican 28
(1896)
Governor of Ohio
(1892–1896)
Garret Hobart[n 4]
March 4, 1897November 21, 1899
Vacant[n 6]
November 21, 1899March 4, 1901
29
(1900)
Theodore Roosevelt
March 4, 1901September 14, 1901
26 Theodore Roosevelt
(1858–1919)
[83][84][85]
September 14, 1901 March 4, 1909
[n 10]
Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
September 14, 1901March 4, 1905
30
(1904)
Charles W. Fairbanks
March 4, 1905March 4, 1909
27 William Howard Taft
(1857–1930)
[86][87][88]
March 4, 1909 March 4, 1913
[n 3]
Republican 31
(1908)
Secretary of War
(1904–1908)
James S. Sherman[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1909October 30, 1912
Vacant[n 6]
October 30, 1912March 4, 1913
28 Woodrow Wilson
(1856–1924)
[89][90][91]
March 4, 1913 March 4, 1921 Democratic 32
(1912)
Governor of New Jersey
(1911–1913)
Thomas R. Marshall
33
(1916)
29 Warren G. Harding
(1865–1923)
[92][93][94]
March 4, 1921 August 2, 1923
[n 5][n 4]
Republican 34
(1920)
U.S. Senator from Ohio
(1915–1921)
Calvin Coolidge
30 Calvin Coolidge
(1872–1933)
[95][96][97]
August 2, 1923 March 4, 1929 Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
August 2, 1923March 4, 1925
35
(1924)
Charles G. Dawes
March 4, 1925March 4, 1929
31 Herbert Hoover
(1874–1964)
[98][99][100]
March 4, 1929 March 4, 1933
[n 3]
Republican 36
(1928)
Secretary of Commerce
(1921–1928)
Charles Curtis
32 Franklin D. Roosevelt
(1882–1945)
[101][102][103]
March 4, 1933 April 12, 1945
[n 5][n 4]
Democratic 37
(1932)
[n 14]
Governor of New York
(1929–1932)
John Nance Garner
March 4, 1933January 20, 1941
38
(1936)
39
(1940)
Henry A. Wallace
January 20, 1941January 20, 1945
40
(1944)
Harry S. Truman
January 20, 1945April 12, 1945
33 Harry S. Truman
(1884–1972)
[104][105][106]
April 12, 1945 January 20, 1953 Democratic Vice President Vacant[n 6]
April 12, 1945January 20, 1949
41
(1948)
Alben W. Barkley
January 20, 1949January 20, 1953
34 Dwight D. Eisenhower
(1890–1969)
[107][108][109]
January 20, 1953 January 20, 1961
[n 15]
Republican 42
(1952)
Supreme Allied Commander Europe
(1949–1952)
Richard Nixon
43
(1956)
35 John F. Kennedy
(1917–1963)
[110][111][112]
January 20, 1961 November 22, 1963
[n 5][n 11]
Democratic 44
(1960)
U.S. Senatorfrom Massachusetts
(1953–1960)
Lyndon B. Johnson
36 Lyndon B. Johnson
(1908–1973)
[113][114]
November 22, 1963 January 20, 1969 Democratic Vice President Vacant[n 6]
November 22, 1963January 20, 1965
45
(1964)
Hubert Humphrey
January 20, 1965January 20, 1969
37 Richard Nixon
(1913–1994)
[115][116][117]
January 20, 1969 August 9, 1974
[n 7]
Republican 46
(1968)
Vice President
(1953–1961)
Spiro Agnew[n 7]
January 20, 1969October 10, 1973
47
(1972)
Vacant[n 6]
October 10, 1973December 6, 1973
Gerald Ford
December 6, 1973August 9, 1974
38 Gerald Ford
(1913–2006)
[118][119][120]
August 9, 1974 January 20, 1977
[n 16]
Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
August 9, 1974December 19, 1974
Nelson Rockefeller
December 19, 1974January 20, 1977
39 Jimmy Carter
(born 1924)
[121][122][123]
January 20, 1977 January 20, 1981
[n 3]
Democratic 48
(1976)
Governor of Georgia
(1971–1975)
Walter Mondale
40 Ronald Reagan
(1911–2004)
[124][125][126]
January 20, 1981 January 20, 1989 Republican 49
(1980)
Governor of California
(1967–1975)
George H. W. Bush
50
(1984)
41 George H. W. Bush
(born 1924)
[127][128][129]
January 20, 1989 January 20, 1993
[n 3]
Republican 51
(1988)
Vice President Dan Quayle
42 Bill Clinton
(born 1946)
[130][131][132]
January 20, 1993 January 20, 2001 Democratic 52
(1992)
Governor of Arkansas
(1979–1981, 1983–1992)
Al Gore
53
(1996)
43 George W. Bush
(born 1946)
[133][134][135]
January 20, 2001 January 20, 2009 Republican 54
(2000)
Governor of Texas
(1995–2000)
Dick Cheney
55
(2004)
44 Barack Obama
(born 1961)
[136][137][138]
January 20, 2009 Incumbent Democratic 56
(2008)
U.S. Senator from Illinois
(2005–2008)
Joe Biden
57
(2012)

Living former presidents

As of January 2015, there are four living former presidents:

President Term of office Date of birth
Jimmy Carter 1977–1981 October 1, 1924 (age 90)
George H. W. Bush 1989–1993 June 12, 1924 (age 90)
Bill Clinton 1993–2001 August 19, 1946 (age 68)
George W. Bush 2001–2009 July 6, 1946 (age 68)