Top Ten Creepy Clown Clusters of 2016

By: Twilight Language

Top Ten Creepy Clown Clusters of 2016
by Loren Coleman, author of The Copycat Effect
(New York: Simon and Schuster, 2004).


Following in the tradition of my clown list from 2008, my notes on evil clowns (and Joker copycats) for 2009, my documenting of real killer clowns in 2010, my list of evil clowns of 2011, similar weirdness in 2012, a compilation for 2013, and the creepy clown reports in California, countrywide in the USA & in France, ending us back in Aurora for 2014, and finally Top Ten Evil Clown Stories of 2015, here is my new “top ten” gathering of “creepy clown clusters” that occurred in the extraordinary Year of 2016.

First, let us reflect on 2016. No year since 1981 – when Phantom Clowns were sighted and then first discussed in book form via Mysterious America –  has there been such a multilayered, massive explosion of reports of clown accounts among the populace, first in America, and then worldwide.
The hints began in the Spring of ’16, overseas.

(1) Germany ~ February

The first unusual clown event of 2016 occurred in Kassel, Germany. Two activists in clown costumes disrupted a meeting of the German anti-migrant party Alternative for Germany by throwing a cake into the face of Beatrix von Storch, one of the party’s leaders and a European Parliament member. The men approached von Storch while she was presiding over a closed-door Alternative for Germany party meeting held in Kassel, Germany, on February 28, 2016. They sang “Happy Birthday” as one of them threw a cake into von Storch’s face and the other filmed the incident.
(2) Mexico ~ March

On the weekend of March 19-20, 2016, Tony Tambor, also known as Marco Antonio Vazquez, claimed he was repeatedly punched and kicked at a Sonora, Mexico party for 30 children, according to the Houston Chronicle. Tambor may lose his eyesight, according to the Mexico News Daily.

(3) Wisconsin ~ August

The largest wave of reports of clowns in recent history began in a small way in Green Bay, Wisconsin, in early August 2016. A mysterious clown that seemingly came out of someone’s warped sense of humor was spotted in Green Bay, according to photographs making the rounds of the social media. A Facebook page called “Gags – The Green Bay Clown” claimed the first sighting happened August 1, 2016, at 2:00 a.m.

By definition, these clowns were “stalking clowns.”

(4) Carolinas ~ August

“Phantom Clowns” soon popped up. On August 29, 2016, residents at the Fleetwood Manor Apartments in Greenville County, South Carolina, reported that a person wearing a clown costume had been spotted lurking around the apartment complex trying to convince children to come into the woods. This was followed quickly on September 4, 2016, when police in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, received a call about a clown looking to lure children into the woods. The Phantom Clown accounts then spread throughout the Carolinas. See also “Phantom Clowns in Greenville: Four Sightings,” “Phantom Clowns: Spartanburg,” “Phantom Clowns: Winston-Salem,” “Phantom Clowns: Two New Piedmont Triad Incidents,” “Phantom Clowns: Fayette Factor,” and “Phantom Clowns: High Point.”

These reports were classic “Phantom Clowns,” and did not seem to be real people dressing up as clowns, i.e. “Stalking Clowns.” See, “Phantom Clowns: Classified.”

(5) Ohio ~ August

Like dropping a pebble in a pond, the ripples of Phantom Clown sightings went out from the Carolinas. Ohio seemed to be hit first.

A knife-wielding clown reported in the Northland area might prove a hoax, but Columbus, Ohio, police say they aren’t taking any chances. A 14-year-old boy told police that a 6-foot-tall man in dark clothing and a clown mask chased him a short distance as he walked to a school bus stop at about 6:15 a.m. Tuesday, August 30, 2016, said police spokesman Sgt. Rich Weiner.  The boy told police that the incident occurred just before sunrise in his neighborhood, near Satinwood and Ironwood drives.

See also, “Phantom Clowns: Ohio.”

(6) Georgia and Alabama ~ September

Next, leaping from the Carolinas to Ohio, clown incidents turned up in Georgia and Alabama. On September 14, 2016, McDuffie County deputies in Georgia say Cameron Frails, 12, and his little brother, were walking to a bus stop when they were chased by men donning clown costumes. The next day, on September 15, 2016, authorities locked down Escambia County High School and Flomaton High School in Southern Alabama after clowns threaten students and post gun emojis on Facebook. So-called “Flomo Klowns” were spotted on the premises of both schools. On September 15, 2016, police in Flomaton, Alabama, arrest 22-year-old Makayla Smith and two underage accomplices in connection with the threats to students at Escambia County High School and Flomaton High School. A middle school girl in Athens, Georgia, was arrested on September 21, 2016, after bringing a knife into school. She claims it was for protection against clown attacks.

See also, “Phantom Clowns: Alabama,” “Phantom Clown: Macon + LaGrange,” and “Phantom Clowns: Greensboro + Green Name Game.”

(7) United States ~ September

Creepy Clown Sightings Map 2016.

After the initial sightings, all kinds of encounters with clowns were reported throughout the United States, as can be seen from this summary or this one.

      Sep. 19: Several children report a series of clown sightings in different neighborhoods of

Annapolis, Maryland

      . Police later confirm the reports to be a hoax.
      Sep. 21: A 12-year-old in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, is chased by a clown through a park.
      Sep. 24: A Palm Bay, Florida, resident reports spotting two “killer clowns” while walking her dog. She says the clowns were staring at her and frightened her to the point that she called police after returning home.
      Sep. 25: A child in

Phillipsburg, New Jersey

      , is chased by three people who emerged from the woods dressed as clowns. Nobody has been hurt in the town but it is the fourth such incident reported in the area. Residents plead with the troublemakers to stop their antics.
      Sep. 27:

Tennessee

      officials put out a warning telling residents to be vigilant as Halloween approaches. One teenager reports being attacked by a clown.
      Sep. 27: Police in

Phoenix

      say two different fast-food restaurants were robbed by suspects wearing clown masks.
      Sep. 30:

The New York Times

      reports that false reports or threats in connection to sightings of “creepy clowns” have led to the arrest of

12 people in over 10 states

      .
      Sep. 30: Threatening Facebook post from the account “Aint Clownin Around” leave at least five schools in three separate states on high alert. The post sent to students in students in

Westside High School in Houston

    reads, “We will be at all High schools this Friday to either kidnap students or kill teachers going to they cars …”
By October, reports were coming in from Idaho, Alaska, California, Arkansas, and several other states.
(8) Worldwide ~ October
By mid-October 2016, clown sightings were being recorded in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Netherlands, Norway, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.
Reports in the UK – in England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland – called them “Killer Clowns.”
(9) USA ~ October
One of the major outcomes of the “Creepy Clown Epidemic” of 2016 was the temporary (?) retiring of Ronald McDonald.

On Tuesday, October 11, 2016, the McDonald’s Corporation acknowledged that it will henceforth be “thoughtful in respect to Ronald McDonald’s participation in community events” as a result of the “current climate around clown sightings in communities.” It became obvious that the overlap was not imaginary.

See also, “Precursor to Creepy Clowns: Ronald McDonald.”

(10) USA – 2016

An earlier indicator that “creepy clowns” were on the horizon happened in June 2015, and continued into early 2016, when front page clown images and political cartoons of Donald Trump appeared in New York City and other newspapers.
The number of clown-Trump visual jokes merely increased as the year went along.
The above meme was based on an infamous scene from Stephen King’s IT!
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One last note.
The media’s many stories on the “Creepy Clown Epidemic” personally pulled me into the analysis long before any reporter interviewed me. Instead, the use of my 1981 work and coining of the phrase “Phantom Clowns” caused journalists to write about and quote me. See here and this brief overview.

Creepy Clown Considerations

(excerpt: Twilight Language)

The Daily Mail mapped out what clown reports they had gathered, as of October 1, 2016. There are many more than these.
Thirty-five years ago, the phrase “Phantom Clowns” was added to my twilight language lexicon, when the actual “Phantom Clowns” appeared in America. I wrote about them, in depth, in Mysterious America.

For those who have been wondering about my recent silence, in the midst of these days of heightened clown sightings, a word or two.

I have been traveling for weeks now, giving talks at conferences and festivals. While my presentations have centered on cryptozoological subjects, people have often wanted to discuss the epidemic of clown appearances. I am keenly aware this is a topic of interest to many folks.

My journeys have taken me from Point Pleasant, West Virginia, to Niagara Falls, New York, and then on to Minerva, Ohio, as well as from the Berkshires of Massachusetts to upcoming events in Minnesota and Wisconsin. I have watched with much interest the explosion in the “Phantom Clowns” incidents, and the confusion by the media with the “Stalking Clowns” accounts.

I need to be in one location (home in Portland, Maine) to analyze, track, and compile what has been happening. Please be patient with me. I will get to this important work.

I have kept in reserve some contributions that I will use from a few of you, including links being sent my way.

The input has been overwhelming. For example, reportedly, there are 30 sites in Ohio alone where “clowns” of one kind or another have been “sighted.”

Vocativ’s image of a “Phantom Clown” may be a bit too cheery, compared to the luring clowns reported.

There are also accounts of a deadly school shooting, a clown-related death, and perhaps harm done to someone in a clown costume. Is there a predictive link between the clowns and school violence? I hope to capture some newsworthy items here, in the near future, and ponder their linkages.

Rolling Stone’s horrific “Phantom Clown” image is much scarier than most descriptions of the “real” ones seen.

I have also noticed that the alternative and mainstream media – Atlas Obscura, Seeker,  VocativWashington Post, New York Times, Rolling Stone, ReasonThe Conversation, Quartz, and others – have jumped in with overview “Phantom Clowns” articles, often quoting me.

I am grateful that there has been all due acknowledgment of my 1981 coining of the phrase “Phantom Clowns,” and the realization that the 1981 cases came a half-decade before Stephen King’s IT, published in 1986.

It is intriguing to read that I “came up with something called “The Phantom Clown Theory,” which attributes the proliferation of clown sightings to mass hysteria (usually sparked by incidents witnessed only by children).” Source, The Conversation, September 28, 2016.

Credit: J. D. Crowe

Also, there does seem to be a growing awareness that the “coincidence” of these clown sightings in this 2016 election year may, indeed, be synchromystic.

Top Ten American Triangles”

By: Twilight Language

As a renamed documentary, The Bridgewater Triangle will make its national television debut on Saturday, September 5, 2015, at 10:00 PM Eastern Time, on the cable network Destination America. The channel will be airing a condensed broadcast hour (42 minute) cut of the film, under their newly created title, America’s Bermuda Triangle. The repeats will exist for years, and the awareness of the Bridgewater Triangle will expand.

The renaming of the documentary for the shorter version occurred weeks ago, perhaps even months before Wednesday, August 26, 2015’s major media eruption of the name “Bridgewater,” in conjunction with the first ever, on air, live shooting of two journalists. It was not lost on me that the shooting event happened at the Bridgewater Plaza in Virginia.

Bridgewaters, wherever they are, needless to say, have had a history of strange happenings and phenomena. In the 1830s, in Bridgewater, Pennsylvania, a small Bigfoot was confronted by a man picking berries; the creature ran off when chased. In December 1969, and then again in March-April 1970, near Bridgewater, Massachusetts, in the midst of the future named Bridgewater Triangle, many sightings of a Bigfoot, including by a police officer, took place. In the summer 1976, near Bridgewater, New Jersey, three teens saw a Bigfoot while they were playing in the woods and then found three-toed footprints. On July 27, 2015, a UFO sighting occurred in Bridgewater, New Jersey. There are also reports of a blond ghost around Bridgewater, New Jersey.

Bridgewater – a bridge over a body of water – evokes the challenge of the terrestrial over the aquatic.

America’s Bermuda Triangle


Of course, the new name given to the documentary by the cable network is relatively silly.

The actual coining of the term “Bermuda Triangle” seems to point to Vincent Gaddis, a Fortean friend of Ivan T. Sanderson. In the February 1964 issue of Argosy, Vincent Gaddis’ article “The Deadly Bermuda Triangle” used the phrase widely for the first time. Sanderson wrote the well-known followup article, “The Twelve Devil’s Graveyards Around the World,” in 1972, for Saga magazine.

The real Bermuda Triangle is partially in America, since Florida makes up part of the eastern side of that “triangle,” so why change the perfectly good name from The Bridgewater Triangle to America’s Bermuda Triangle? The moniker does acknowledge this is a new edit, and not the directors’ cut.

Destination America is also referring to what they feel is the better known “Bermuda Triangle” name, although they might be surprised how many people know about the Bridgewater Triangle, nowadays. Plus, most of the other “Triangles” have been labeled with those names because I began this practice in the 1970s, with the Bridgewater Triangle.

Therefore, since they gave The Bridgewater Triangle the name America’s Bermuda Triangle, let’s switch this back around a bit and look at

America’s Bridgewater Triangles

#1. Bridgewater Triangle, Massachusetts

The Bridgewater Triangle was coined in the late 1970s (probably 1976) by yours truly, Loren Coleman, who published the phrase for the first time in the April 1980 article of the same name inBoston Magazine, and in the 1983 book, Mysterious America (Faber and Faber, 1983; now in a completely revised 2007 edition). A local newspaper published the name “The Bridgewater Triangle” after I gave a library lecture using the phrase in the late 1970s, in the Bridgewater area.

The Bridgewater Triangle is the focus of decades of weird activity (UFO sightings; cattle mutilations; Hell Hound encounters; Black Panther accounts; Giant Snake tales; strange people disappearances; little creature folklore, plus the 1969-1970s Bigfoot activity mentioned above) in a 200-square-mile area in southeastern Massachusetts. The Bridgewater Triangle is roughly defined by the towns of Abington in the north, Freetown in the southeast, and Rehoboth in the southwest, an area that encompasses the Hockomock Swamp and the “infamous” Freetown/Fall River State Forest. (See at bottom for more information on The Bridgewater Triangle.)

#2. The Bennington Triangle, Vermont

The Bennington Triangle was coined by writer Joseph A. Citro in 1992. According to Citro, the area shares characteristics with the Bridgewater Triangle in neighboring Massachusetts, and so he used a similar name.

This Vermont location has many of the same phenomena found in the Bridgewater Triangle. Citro related the disappearances of Middie Rivers (1945), Paula Weldon (1946), James Tedford (1949), Paul Jepson (1950), and Frieda Langer (1950), to the Bennington Triangle.

One of the more bizarre legends associated with this Vermont site is the man-eating stone of Glastonbury Mountain, which made its first appearance in Citro’s book The Vermont Monster Guide(2009). The man-eating stone is exactly what it sounds like…a rock that eats people.

A Wikipedia editor rather harshly noted that “precisely what area is encompassed in this hypothetical ‘mystery triangle’ is not clear.”

But Citro is rather clear about where The Bennington Triangle is. It is centered on Glastenbury Mountain and includes some or most of the area of the towns immediately surrounding it, especially Bennington, Woodford, Shaftsbury, and Somerset. Glastenbury and its neighboring township Somerset were both once moderately thriving logging and industrial towns, but began declining toward the late 19th century and are now essentially ghost towns, unincorporated by an act of the state legislature in 1937.

#3. The Coudersport Triangle, Pennsylvania

Thunderbirds have been seen in northern Pennsylvania, in an area known as the “Coudersport Triangle,” which overlaps with the spooky Black Forest of the same location. Most of the Thunderbird sightings come from the Black Forest region of Clinton, Potter, Lycoming, Tioga, Cameron, and McKean counties, sparsely populated areas of mainly state forests and gamelands. Besides the Thunderbirds, tales of Black Panthers are part of the traditions here.

The major chronicler of the variously named Coudersport Triangle, Black Forest, or Forbidden Land accounts is the late Pennsylvania writer Robert Lyman, who penned a series of volumes in hisAmazing Indeed, Strange Events in the Black Forest series.

In 2004, I traveled to the Coudersport Triangle, on location for an episode of a Discovery program for young people on the Black Forest’s Thunderbird reports. Other programs have dealt with the same topic.

The Animal X program on the Black Forest contains eyewitness accounts from the Coudersport Triangle, but then drifts into showing the “Chief John Huffer” footage from Illinois of what appears to be turkey vultures (but acts like they are from Pennsylvania).

#4. The Virginia Triangle, Virginia and North Carolina

In Weird Virginia: Your Travel Guide to Virginia’s Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets (Sterling, 2007), I wrote of the “Virginia Triangle.” I penned this paragraph on page 37:

The Great Dismal Swamp is a marshy wetland that goes from Norfolk, located on the Elizabeth River, through southeastern Virginia’s Coast Plain into northeastern North Carolina. It has been known as a miniversion of the Bermuda Triangle, on the level of other states’ mystery triangles, like the Coudersport Triangle (linked to the Black Forest) in Pennsylvania or the Bridgewater Triangle (aligned with the Hockomock Swamp) in Massachusetts. Reports of ancient mysteries, as well as sighting of giant snakes and Bigfoot, have been associated with the Great Dismal Swamp.

Lake Drummond, a 3,100-acre lake, is located in the heart of the swamp, and only one of two natural lakes in Virginia. It was discovered in 1655, by former Scottish indentured servant William Drummond. Drummond went on to be governor of North Carolina, and was later hanged in Virginia. Lake Drummond is almost a perfect circle, and some thought has been given to it having been formed by a meteorite, a peat fire, or a tectonic shift. Native American tradition talks of “the Fire Bird” creating the freshwater lake.

#5. The Great Lakes Triangle and Michigan Triangle, Wisconsin, Michigan, Canada

Jay Gourley’s book The Great Lakes Triangle first appeared on May 12, 1977. The focus was the disappearance of planes and ships throughout the entire region of the Great Lakes, as shown on the map below. The area was too large for it to be seen as a popular topic for research discussions by the mainstream media.

On the television program In Search Of…, the late Leonard Nimoy narrated the episode entitled “The Great Lakes Triangle,” which aired on November 2, 1978.

As noted in the Skeptoid,
Author Hugh Cochrane thanks Jay Gourley in his own book, Gateway To Oblivion: The Great Lakes’ Bermuda Triangle. And from there, he expands upon the idea that the Great Lakes are host to vile vortices, UFO hotspots, Earth energies, and an entire catalog of unproven phenomena.
The Michigan Triangle, where many planes, ships, and people go missing, stretches from the town of Ludington to Benton Harbor in Michigan; another links from Benton Harbor to Manitowoc, Wisconsin; the final side connects Manitowoc back to Ludington. The Michigan Triangle is an extension of Jay Gourley’s original idea, earlier, of The Great Lakes Triangle.

The Lake Michigan Triangle has been mentioned on Willian Shatner’s Weird or What?, it has a place entry on the Atlas Obscura, and the Travel Channel’s Mysteries at the Museum reported on it.

#6. The Big Lick Triangle, Indiana and Kentucky

In 2013, a clever blogger named Ben did his homework, and came up with this:

Children, have you ever heard of “The Bridgewater Triangle?”
Go and google it … I’ll wait.
OK, as we all now know, “The Bridgewater Triangle” refers to this vague geographic area in southeast Massachusetts. Weighing in at about 200 square miles, the Bridgewater Triangle is claimed to be a hotbed of paranormal activity — like every X-File you can image: UFOs, ghosts of all kind, Bigfoot, Thunderbirds, cattle mutilation, satanic activity, black helicopters, phantom pumas …
Back in the 1980s, a paranormal researcher was looking at a map and noticed that a lot of his ghost, Bigfeet and flying saucer reports happened in southern Mass, a few hundred miles around a town called Bridgewater. So he got his magic marker / sharpie, drew the rough borders on the map, and BAM! Instant paranormal fame.

Well, since that Fortean researcher was me (Loren Coleman) and I didn’t use a magic marker in the 1970s (not the 1980s), I am honored by this cute passage, anyway.

Ben* goes on to notice the strange coincidences of his own area’s phenomena – in a rough shape configured with three towns named Lick on each corner. Then he coined the name The Big Lick Triangle.

His body of linking evidence shows he had fun, especially since his area is “roughly 2269.9 square miles of weird” compared to 200 square miles of the Bridgewater Triangle. He surprisingly found much more that was strange in this Triangle that he reckoned for, and he appears to have been overjoyed with his discoveries.

My personal favorite in The Big Lick Triangle – and one that I have mentioned in my books – is the green, 10-foot-tall monster with glowing red eyes, seen in March 1965, by teenagers in the woods south of French Lick, Indiana. It grew to be called “Fluorescent Freddie.” Unfortunately, it never became as famous as that other local tall native – Larry Bird.

*Update: “Ben” read this selection and got in contact. He identifies himself as Ben Schneider, and pointed out the fact “The Big Lick Triangle” has a curious name game to note. There is a “Bridgewater” name inside the configured area. It’s the Bridgewater Cemetery in Scottsburg, Indiana, a town near the northern border of the Big Lick Triangle. Quoting from Ben’s blog, the Bridgewater Cemetery is “haunted by an entity called ‘Old Red Eyes.’ It is often seen glowing at the back of the cemetery. A black form or object will often circle around cars, and handprints will appear on the windows. A white phantom horse sometimes chases gawkers away at night, and there is also the glowing tombstone of a man who awakens at night and guards the front gate.”

Ben’s comedic relief is apparent in his creation of this Triangle, but there’s no reason to leave it off the list of Triangles, even if we know he’s somewhat doing this exercise with his tongue firming in his cheek. He may have been hiding his Fortean wit behind his sarcasm, but the end result was pure satisfaction and enjoyment.

#7. The Nevada Triangle, Nevada and California

The disappearance of maverick aviator and daredevil entrepreneur Steve Fossett in 2007 brought into focus an area called The Nevada Triangle. Observers have documented more than 2,000 planes having crashed there in the past 60 years, including reports of UFOs and alien abduction, in the area that emcompasses Reno, Fresno, China Lake, Las Vegas, and Groom Lake, a/k/a Area 51. Any location with Area 51 appears destined to be an enigmatic area, right?

The Mystery of the Nevada Triangle was a 2010 Channel 4 (UK) production about the location and the disappearance of Steve Fossett. Several news outlets, such as Fox News, reported on The Nevada Triangle in 2010.

#8. The Alaska Triangle, Alaska

The Alaska Triangle is also called Alaska’s Devil’s Graveyard, because so many ships and airplanes have disappeared in there.
Planes go down, hikers go missing and Alaskan residents and tourists seem to vanish into the largely untouched backdrop.

The so-called Alaska Triangle slices through four of the state’s regions, from the southeastern wilderness and fjords to the interior tundra and up to the arctic mountain ranges. Its points include the large swath of land from Juneau and Yakutat in the southeast, the Barrow mountain range in the north, and Anchorage in the center of the state.

#9. The Little Egypt Triangle, Illinois

The Southern Triangle of Illinois forms an area also given the name “Little Egypt” or “Egypt.” The Triangle forms nicely from the southern third of the state of Illinois. With the area code 618, the southern part of Illinois is geographically, culturally, and economically distinct from the rest of the state. The region is bordered by the most voluminous rivers in the United States: the Wabash and Ohio rivers to the east and south, and the Mississippi River and its connecting Missouri River to the west.

Southern Illinois’ most populated city is currently Belleville (see The Bell Name) at 44,478. Other principal cities include Alton, Centralia, Collinsville, Edwardsville, O’Fallon, Harrisburg, Mt. Vernon, Marion, and Carbondale, where the main campus of Southern Illinois University is located. It also has a campus at Edwardsville. Residents travel to amenities in St. Louis and Cape Girardeau, Missouri; Memphis, Tennessee; Evansville, Indiana; and Paducah, Kentucky. The region is also home to a major military installation, Scott Air Force Base.

I completed my undergraduate studies in anthropology/zoology at SIU-C. While there, and often not going to classes, I would investigate many Fortean and cryptozoological wonders in this area, from Black Panthers (Shawnee National Forest) to small red apes (swamps around Mt. Vernon and other towns), large birds (especially in the Alton area) to stone walls (across the Triangle). Several passages in my books, especially in Mysterious America, are about the cases in The Little Egypt Triangle.
The name game is strong in Little Egypt, with Thebes, Karnak, New Memphis, Dongola, and Cairo having lexilinks to ancient Egypt. SIU-C’s students attending Little Egypt’s leading university readThe Daily Egyptian and call their athletic teams “The Salukis” (Egyptian hunting dogs). In nearby states are West Memphis and Memphis. Some have related these names to the strong Egyptian influences in the Supreme Council, 33°, Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Southern Jurisdiction, which had a sway over this area, technically south of the Mason/Dixon Line.
Little Egypt’s Fayville (see the Fayette Factor), Illinois, is an unincorporated community in Alexander County, Illinois, located along the Mississippi River south of Thebes.

#10. The Ossipee Triangle, New Hampshire

First appearing in print as “The Ossipee Triangle” in Info Journal, Vol 12-13, 1987, the label was inspired by The Bridgewater Triangle. The name was coined by investigator Ken Moak. The Ossipee Triangle includes most of Carrol County in eastern New Hampshire, and at the center is Ossipee Lake. The Ossipee Triangle is the home of Mystery Pond (now called Snake Pond), UFOs, Indian mounds, ghost stories, disappearances of boats and planes, and other oddities.

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More on The Bridgewater Triangle/America’s Bermuda Triangle.

Triangle Documentary to See National Audience

In October of 2013, The Bridgewater Triangle documentary premiered to a sell-out crowd of over 750 people at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. One year later, the exclusive US broadcast rights to the film were licensed to Discovery Communications’ Destination America network. The channel will air a 42-minute (broadcast hour) version of the documentary under the title, America’s Bermuda Triangle, a name which they hope will help to draw-in a broader national audience. The film will broadcast on Saturday September 5th at 10:00 PM Eastern Time. Viewers are encouraged to check with their local cable and satellite providers for availability and channel number. To celebrate the occasion, a free viewing party will be held that same night at Christopher’s Lounge at 1285 Broadway in Raynham, Massachusetts. The event is open to the public and will begin at 8:00 PM with a screening of the original 90-minute directors’ cut of The Bridgewater Triangle. At 10:00 PM, Christopher’s many televisions will be tuned in to Destination America as The Bridgewater Triangle(airing as America’s Bermuda Triangle) makes its debut on national television. A number of the film’s cast and crew members will be present at the event.

First named and defined, in 1978, by world-renown cryptozoologist and author Loren Coleman, the 200-square-mile Bridgewater Triangle sits within the Southeastern portion of Massachusetts, and includes a number of locations known for unexplained occurrences; the most prominent of which include the legendary Hockomock Swamp and the infamous Freetown-Fall River State Forest. The triangle’s traditional boarders are revealed by connecting the dots between the town of Abington to the North, the town of Freetown to the Southeast, and the town of Rehoboth to the Southwest. The area hosts an unusually high volume of reports involving strange happenings, baffling mysteries and sinister deeds. From ghostly hauntings and cryptid animal sightings, to UFO encounters and evidence of satanic ritual sacrifice, the Bridgewater Triangle serves as one of the world’s most diverse hotspots for paranormal activity. The first-ever feature-length documentary on the subject,The Bridgewater Triangle explores the history of this fascinating region. The film features a number of local residents providing first-hand accounts of unexplained occurrences. In addition, an all-star assembly of paranormal researchers, folklorists and authors provide expert analysis regarding the many mysteries of the triangle. Among the film’s on-screen personalities are Loren Coleman, and Ghost Adventures writer and author Jeff Belanger.

During its twenty-two month long run, the independently produced documentary, which was filmed entirely in Massachusetts, has been featured on the nationally-syndicated Coast to Coast AM radio show, on WCVB’s Chronicle, on Fox 25’s Zip Trips, and in a segment on WJAR in Providence. The film has also been covered in a number of publications including the nationally-distributed Rue Morgue magazine and the Boston Globe. On the festival circuit, the documentary received the Audience Award at the 2014 Terror Con Film Festival, in Providence, won Best Documentary at the Winter 2015 Macabre Faire Film Festival on Long Island, New York, and won Best Local at the 2015 Granite State Film Festival, in Manchester, New Hampshire. Reviews of the movie have been positive, including eight favorable write-ups from independent critics, and an 8.0 out of 10 stars rating on the Internet Movie Database. In late 2014, The Bridgewater Triangle became available on UltraFlix, NanoTech Entertainment’s 4k movie streaming service.

The film’s producers hope that a successful run on Destination America will lead to additional opportunities, including a chance to be shown on Discovery Communications’ flagship network, the Discovery Channel, and the possibility of generating an international interest in The Bridgewater Triangle with overseas broadcast and distribution deals. The producers will also retain the film’s exclusive Blu-ray, DVD and Internet On-Demand distribution rights, and the original 90-minute feature will remain available through their website.

This early 2000s map of the Bridgewater Triangle was created for a Boston Globe article about the area, and gave a decidedly more humanlike slant to the traditions.

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Do you know of more “Bridgewater Triangles” in America? If so, let me know.
In the meantime…watch….

The Charleston Massacre and the Name Game

By: twilight language

The name game and twilight language have been visible to readers of this blog for years. In the wake of the June 17, 2015, killing of nine in Charleston, South Carolina, the rest of the world seems to have been awakened to the symbols in their midst.

Dylann Storm Roof is the root of this awareness, in many ways, due to his overwhelming employment of overt items like the Confederate flags, Nazi-employed numbers (14, 88, 1488), and even the Othala rune.

 

Roof was apprehended on June 18, 2015, after a motorist spotted his black Hyundai Elantra, which displays an apartheid “Confederate States of America” license plate on the front bumper, while driving near Shelby, North Carolina.

On June 24, 2015, in a flash fire across the South, of breaking news alerts, one state after another, one business after another, talked of removing Confederate flags, directly due to them being used as symbols of racist and hate.

Dylann Storm Roof, alleged Charleston gunman
Adam Lanza, Newtown gunman
James Holmes, Aurora gunman
Jared Loughner, Tuscon gunman
Nidal Hasan, Fort Hood gunman

Symbols. Eyes of hate. Now names too are being mined for significance in the aftermath of the massacre. We have mentioned the names of streets for a long time. Now others are noticing, and it is enlightening to see how far afield this is going.

John C. Calhoun, 1849

In all the news coverage of the shooting at Emanuel AME Church, it’s rarely been mentioned* that it’s located at 110 Calhoun, a street named after John C. Calhoun.
That’s right: family members of those killed have to go to memorial services at Emanuel AME and look at street signs honoring one of the most rabid supporters of slavery in American history.
Calhoun was vice president from 1825 to 1832, during the administrations of John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson, and then became a powerful U.S. senator from South Carolina. Calhoun himself owned a plantation and lots of people. He pushed not just for the preservation of slavery but its expansion into new territories to the west. And he was a major advocate of 1850’s Fugitive Slave Act. Source.

The whole South is the grave of Calhoun. ”
— Yankee Soldier (1865)

*”Rarely mentioned”: In actual fact, several news sites have mentioned the address and talked about the unfortunate reality of the address for the Mother Emanuel Church being on Calhoun Street.

The examination of the use of the name even spread to a debate regarding Lake Calhoun in Minnesota, noted on June 23, 2015, in the Star-Tribune.

The perennial question of renaming Lake Calhoun has been revived with a new directive to Park Board staff to look into the issue again as an online petition against the name topped 1,700 signatures.
Park Board President Liz Wielinski announced at a special board meeting Monday that staff had been directed to report back to the board by its first September meeting on the issue on the naming process….
The petition was launched by Mike Spangenberg of Minneapolis after last week’s killings of nine people at a Charleston, S.C., church, He said the petition represents confronting the nation’s past and addressing systemic racism. Park Commissioner Brad Bourn also has advocated for a name change.
During his 30 years on the national stage as a lawmaker, vice president and secretary of war, John C. Calhoun argued that slavery was a positive good for those enslaved, and espoused such states rights doctrines as the ability of a state to nullify federal acts with which it disagreed.
His tie to the area now known as Minneapolis comes from his action as secretary of war to President James Monroe to establish Fort Snelling at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers. Source.

Calhoun is also linked to an early “going postal” event. On December 2, 1983, in Calhoun County, Alabama, James Brooks, 53, entered the Anniston, Alabama, post office with a .38 caliber pistol, killing the postmaster, and injuring his immediate supervisor. Subsequent to killing the postmaster, James Brooks ran up the stairs of the building pursuing his supervisor and shooting him twice.

Meanwhile, the bust of a Confederate general and leading figure in the early days of the Ku Klux Klan – Nathan Bedford Forrest – was being being proposed to be removed from the Tennessee statehouse, top Tennessee Democrats and the state Republican Party chairman said on June 23rd.

Some of the discussion has been extreme, such as CNN anchor Ashleigh Banfield questioning whether the Jefferson Memorial should be taken down because Jefferson owned slaves. “There is a monument to him in the capital city of the United States. No one ever asks for that to come down,” Banfield said.

Infowars blogger Paul Joseph Watson compared taking down the Jefferson Memorial to the logic of Islamic State terrorists “who have spent the last year tearing down historical statues and monuments because they offend their radical belief system.”

Anything taken out of context can be questioned. George Washington, Andrew Jackson and James Madison also owned slaves.

At the University of Texas, Austin, a public statue of Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederacy, was reportedly vandalized this week with the words “Black Lives Matter” and “Bump the Chumps.” Another Davis statue at the Statehouse in Frankfort, Ky., has come under scrutiny, with some calling for the work of art to be taken down.
One of those advocating for its removal is Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin, who was quoted in the Hill newspaper as saying, “It is important never to forget our history, but parts of our history are more appropriately displayed in museums, not on government property.”
Statues on the Austin campus of Robert E. Lee, who commanded the Confederate army, and Albert Sidney Johnston, a Confederate general who died during the Civil War, were also vandalized in recent days, according to reports. Source.

Are Jefferson, Madison, Forrest, and Lee some of the names we need to follow? Why haven’t we paid more attention to Calhoun?

The idea of the “name game” became very formalized with “the Fayette Factor?” It was first discovered by researcher William (Bill) Grimstad (a/k/a Jim Brandon), back in 1977, and written about in “Fateful Fayette,” Fortean Times, No. 25, Spring 1978.

Since Grimstad’s discovery, several items on this lexilink between Fayette (as well as its related forms – Lafayette, La Fayette, Fayetteville, Lafayetteville) and high strangeness have been published. In his book, Weird America (New York: EP Dutton, 1978), Grimstad mentions several “power name” hot spots but did not dwell on them.

Concurrently, I was writing of other name games. In 1978, I wrote and had published afterward, inFortean Times, no. 29, Summer 1979, my “Devil Names and Fortean Places.”

The Rebirth of Pan (1st edition, Firebird Press, 1983)
 
Mysterious America (1st edition, Faber & Faber, 1983).

In exchanges with Bill, a small group of Forteans discussed the Fayette Factor and name game privately throughout the late 1970s. It was not until Grimstad’s (now extremely rare) The Rebirth of Pan: Hidden Faces of the American Earth Spirit (Firebird Press, 1983) and Mysterious America(Boston: Faber and Faber, 1983) that more in-depth analyses of the name game “coincidences” seriously occurred. These examinations were followed by updates and other comments in Mysterious America (NY: Simon and Schuster, 2006), and another book of mine (NY: Paraview, 2002). Furthermore, the appearance of widely available material on the name game (including from John A. Keel) started routinely being posted online during the 1990s-2010s, including in this blog.

 

The idea was to raise awareness for the “twilight language” behind names – for example of the town you lived in, the street on which you lived, and those names heard on the news.

In The Rebirth of Pan: Hidden Faces of the American Earth Spirit, Grimstad writes, regarding the “name game”:

I’m not talking here of such spooky tongue-twisters as H.P. Lovecraft’s Yog-Sothoth or Arthur Machen’s Ishakshar, but of quite ordinary names like Bell, Beall and variants, Crowley, Francis, Grafton, Grubb, Magee/McGee, Mason, McKinney, Montpelier, Parsons, Pike, Shelby, Vernon, Watson/Watt, Williams/Williamson. I have others on file, but these are the ones which I have accumulated the most instances.

In my 1983 Mysterious America, I wrote:

Cryptologic or coincidence? Jim Brandon [Bill Grimstad] should be credited with calling attention to the name Watts/Watkins/Watson, and its entanglement with inexplicable things. Some other names involved in mysterious events pinpointed by Brandon are Bell, Mason, Parsons, Pike, Vernon, and Warren. The influence of such names as Mason, Pike, Warren, and Lafayette, for example, issues, in some cryptopolitical and occult way, from their ties to the Masonic tradition.

One of the missions of the abolitionist and Freemason John Brown during his raid of Harper’s Ferry, was the capturing of a Masonic sword. In 1859 he led a raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry. During the raid, he seized the armory; seven people were killed, and ten or more were injured. He intended to arm slaves with weapons from the arsenal, but the attack failed. Within 36 hours, Brown’s men had fled or been killed or captured by local pro-slavery farmers, militiamen, and U.S. Marines led by Robert E. Lee.

A concentration of attention in the past has been on the names of the Founding Fathers and their friends – Washington and Lafayette coming to the top of the list. Other names from the 1812 era, for example, like Stephen Decatur, surface too (see here).
Perhaps some attention will now be given to Civil War and Confederate names – like Calhoun, Albert Pike, and others – in the “name game.”