Reagan-Thatcher 2.0? President Trump & UK PM May Joint Press Conference – Live Feed

Following his first face-to-face meeting with a foreign leader, President Trump and UK Prime Minister Theresa May will hold a joint press conference to discuss establishing stronger economic and strategic ties having vowed to revive the closeness of their countries during the Reagan-Thatcher years.

As USA Today noted, many are comparing Trump and May to Reagan and Thatcher…

He was a skilled communicator and a celebrity. She was strong-willed and shared his disdain for big government.

 

They were the power political couple of the 1980s: Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher. Now a similar pairing is emerging three decades later in President Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May, who meet at the White House on Friday.

Here are five key points that The Hill believes will be top-of-mind during the meeting and the press conference…

U.S.-U.K. trade deal

Trump has said that he wants a trade agreement between the United States and Britain “very quickly,” and May has expressed a similar eagerness to forge a deal. But the United Kingdom must complete negotiations to leave the European Union before it can sign any new trade agreements. That process is expected to begin in March and could take upward of two years to complete. The U.S. and the U.K. can hold discussions and lay the groundwork parallel to the Brexit process so they are prepared to move quickly.  May has said in recent days that she wants the relationship between the United Kingdom and the EU to remain strong.  “I’m confident we can look at areas even in advance of being able to sign a formal trade deal,” she said, according to media reports.

 

Here is MEP Daniel Hannan offering a brief overview of what could be possible…

 

The future of NATO

The long-standing alliance is a top priority for May, who is expected to challenge Trump over his lack of support for the 28-member treaty.  Trump sent mixed messages in a recent interview with two European publications — The Times of London and Bild, a German newspaper — calling NATO  “obsolete” while at the same time saying the alliance “is very important to me.” The president has criticized members for failing to pay their bills and leaving the United States holding the check. But newly confirmed Secretary of Defense James Mattis pledged during his confirmation hearing to “maintain the strongest possible relationship with NATO.” NATO leaders will meet for a major summit in Belgium this summer. Whether Trump will choose to attend remains to be seen, but his decision either way will send a strong message throughout the world.  For her part, May argues that NATO must “evolve to be able to effectively counter the biggest threats of the day, in particular terrorism and cyberattacks.” So expect the British prime minister to not only try to clear up any confusion about where Trump stands but to work to win his support for keeping NATO running at full speed. During her remarks to congressional Republicans, May said, “America’s leadership role in NATO, supported by Britain, must be the central element around which the alliance is built.”

 

The battle against terrorism

Trump made defeating the ISIS and fighting terrorism a central tenet of his campaign.  May told congressional Republicans on Thursday that she joins the U.S. in its “determination to take on and defeat Daesh and the ideology of Islamic extremism that inspires them and many other terrorist groups in the world today,” using another name for ISIS. “It is in both our national interests to do so.”  She said it would require intelligence gathering and “military might” to defeat ISIS.  “But it also demands a wider effort because one of the lessons of fighting terrorism in the last 15 years or so is that yes, killing terrorists can save innocent lives, but until we kill the idea that drives them, the ideology, we will always have to live with this threat.”  In that vein, May is expected to challenge Trump over his widely condemned remarks that the U.S. would consider renewing the use of torture to gather intelligence. During her trip to the U.S., May told reporters: “We condemn torture and my view on that won’t change, whether I am talking to you or talking to the president.”  Top congressional lawmakers have said that they don’t support the legalization of waterboarding or other methods.

 

Conflict in Syria

May said that defeating ISIS hinges on a “secure a political solution in Syria and challenging the alliance between the Syrian regime and its backers in Tehran.” “We must employ all of the diplomatic means at our disposal,” May told Republican lawmakers.  But the situation in Syria, and the two countries’ approach, is in flux. U.K. Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said Thursday that Syrian leader Bashar Assad could remain in power if a peace accord is reached, a big shift from the previous demand that he step down. And Trump has signaled a willingness to work more closely with Russia, which is backing Assad’s regime. Johnson said the U.K. needs to get a clearer picture on where the U.S. stands. “We need to understand exactly where the White House is coming from,” Johnson said on the eve of the Trump-May meeting. “We need to understand how they see the end game here and we need to help shape that conversation.”  Trump is suspending new visas for Syrians and asking the Pentagon and State Department to craft a plan for setting up safe zones for civilians inside war-torn Syria, a move that Russian officials on Thursday said should be thoroughly evaluated. The Obama administration previously had ruled out the move.

 

Relations with Russia

Trump has spoken warmly about Russian President Vladimir Putin, a position that has created unease in the U.S. and around the world.  The new president has said he hopes to make a deal with Putin to reduce nuclear weapons stockpiles that would ease tensions and lead to the lifting of economic sanctions against Moscow. But May warned on Thursday that when it comes to Russia and talks with Putin, her advice is to “engage but beware.” “There is nothing inevitable about conflict between Russia and the West,” she told lawmakers. “And nothing unavoidable about retreating to the days of the Cold War.” “But we should engage with Russia from a position of strength. And we should build the relationships, systems and processes that make cooperation more likely than conflict — and that, particularly after the illegal annexation of Crimea, give assurance to Russia’s neighboring states that their security is not in question,” she said.

List of presidents

 The last 7 Presidents in 42 Years Reveals 7 Headed Beast That Rules 42 Months in Revelation!

Two Presidents Have Died on December 26th

https://zeitgeist77.wordpress.com/2015/01/09/two-presidents-have-died-on-december-26th/

President Took office Left office Party Term
[n 1]
Previous office Vice President
1 George Washington
(1732–1799)
[11][12][13]
April 30, 1789
[n 2]
March 4, 1797 n/a[14] 1
(1789)
Commander-in-Chiefof the Continental Army
(1775–1783)
John Adams
2
(1792)
2 John Adams
(1735–1826)
[15][16][17]
March 4, 1797 March 4, 1801
[n 3]
Federalist 3
(1796)
Vice President Thomas Jefferson
3 Thomas Jefferson
(1743–1826)
[18][19][20]
March 4, 1801 March 4, 1809 Democratic-
Republican
4
(1800)
Vice President Aaron Burr
March 4, 1801March 4, 1805
5
(1804)
George Clinton[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1805April 20, 1812
4 James Madison
(1751–1836)
[21][22][23]
March 4, 1809 March 4, 1817 Democratic-
Republican
6
(1808)
Secretary of State
(1801–1809)
Vacant[n 6]
April 20, 1812March 4, 1813
7
(1812)
Elbridge Gerry[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1813November 23, 1814
Vacant[n 6]
November 23, 1814March 4, 1817
5 James Monroe
(1758–1831)
[24][25][26]
March 4, 1817 March 4, 1825 Democratic-
Republican
8
(1816)
Secretary of State
(1811–1817)
Daniel D. Tompkins
9
(1820)
6 John Quincy Adams
(1767–1848)
[27][28][29]
March 4, 1825 March 4, 1829
[n 3]
Democratic-
Republican
10
(1824)
Secretary of State
(1817–1825)
John C. Calhoun[n 7]
March 4, 1825December 28, 1832
7 Andrew Jackson
(1767–1845)
[30][31][32]
March 4, 1829 March 4, 1837 Democratic 11
(1828)
U.S. Senator from Tennessee
(1823–1825)
Vacant[n 6]
December 28, 1832March 4, 1833
12
(1832)
Martin Van Buren
March 4, 1833March 4, 1837
8 Martin Van Buren
(1782–1862)
[33][34][35]
March 4, 1837 March 4, 1841
[n 3]
Democratic 13
(1836)
Vice President Richard Mentor Johnson
9 William Henry Harrison
(1773–1841)
[36][37][38]
March 4, 1841 April 4, 1841
[n 5][n 4]
Whig 14
(1840)
Minister to Colombia
(1828–1829)
John Tyler
10 John Tyler
(1790–1862)
[39][40][41]
April 4, 1841 March 4, 1845 Whig
April 4, 1841September 13, 1841
Vice President
[n 8]
Vacant[n 6]
Independent[n 9]
September 13, 1841March 4, 1845
11 James K. Polk
(1795–1849)
[42][43][44]
March 4, 1845 March 4, 1849 Democratic 15
(1844)
Governor of Tennessee
(1839–1841)
George M. Dallas
12 Zachary Taylor
(1784–1850)
[45][46][47]
March 4, 1849 July 9, 1850
[n 5][n 4]
Whig 16
(1848)
U.S. Army Major generalfrom the 1st Infantry Regiment
(1846–1849)
Millard Fillmore
13 Millard Fillmore
(1800–1874)
[48][49][50]
July 9, 1850 March 4, 1853
[n 10]
Whig Vice President Vacant[n 6]
14 Franklin Pierce
(1804–1869)
[51][52][53]
March 4, 1853 March 4, 1857 Democratic 17
(1852)
U.S. Army Brigadier generalfrom the 9th Infantry Regiment
(1847–1848)
William R. King[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1853April 18, 1853
Vacant[n 6]
April 18, 1853March 4, 1857
15 James Buchanan
(1791–1868)
[54][55][56]
March 4, 1857 March 4, 1861 Democratic 18
(1856)
Minister to the United Kingdom
(1853–1856)
John C. Breckinridge
16 Abraham Lincoln
(1809–1865)
[57][58][59]
March 4, 1861 April 15, 1865
[n 5][n 11]
Republican 19
(1860)
U.S. Representativefrom Illinois
(1847–1849)
Hannibal Hamlin
March 4, 1861March 4, 1865
Republican
National Union[n 12]
20
(1864)
Andrew Johnson
March 4, 1865April 15, 1865
17 Andrew Johnson
(1808–1875)
[60][61][62]
April 15, 1865 March 4, 1869 Democratic
National Union[n 12]
Independent[n 13]
Vice President Vacant
[n 6]
18 Ulysses S. Grant
(1822–1885)
[63][64][65]
March 4, 1869 March 4, 1877 Republican 21
(1868)
Commanding Generalof the U.S. Army
(1864–1869)
Schuyler Colfax
March 4, 1869March 4, 1873
22
(1872)
Henry Wilson[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1873November 22, 1875
Vacant[n 6]
November 22, 1875March 4, 1877
19 Rutherford B. Hayes
(1822–1893)
[66][67][68]
March 4, 1877 March 4, 1881 Republican 23
(1876)
Governor of Ohio
(1868–1872, 1876–1877)
William A. Wheeler
20 James A. Garfield
(1831–1881)
[69][70][71]
March 4, 1881 September 19, 1881
[n 5][n 11]
Republican 24
(1880)
U.S. Representative from Ohio
(1863–1881)
Chester A. Arthur
21 Chester A. Arthur
(1829–1886)
[72][73][74]
September 19, 1881 March 4, 1885 Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
22 Grover Cleveland
(1837–1908)
[75][76]
March 4, 1885 March 4, 1889
[n 3]
Democratic 25
(1884)
Governor of New York
(1883–1885)
Thomas A. Hendricks[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1885November 25, 1885
Vacant[n 6]
November 25, 1885March 4, 1889
23 Benjamin Harrison
(1833–1901)
[77][78][79]
March 4, 1889 March 4, 1893
[n 3]
Republican 26
(1888)
U.S. Senator from Indiana
(1881–1887)
Levi P. Morton
24 Grover Cleveland
(1837–1908)
[75][76]
March 4, 1893 March 4, 1897 Democratic 27
(1892)
President
(1885–1889)
Adlai Stevenson
25 William McKinley
(1843–1901)
[80][81][82]
March 4, 1897 September 14, 1901
[n 5][n 11]
Republican 28
(1896)
Governor of Ohio
(1892–1896)
Garret Hobart[n 4]
March 4, 1897November 21, 1899
Vacant[n 6]
November 21, 1899March 4, 1901
29
(1900)
Theodore Roosevelt
March 4, 1901September 14, 1901
26 Theodore Roosevelt
(1858–1919)
[83][84][85]
September 14, 1901 March 4, 1909
[n 10]
Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
September 14, 1901March 4, 1905
30
(1904)
Charles W. Fairbanks
March 4, 1905March 4, 1909
27 William Howard Taft
(1857–1930)
[86][87][88]
March 4, 1909 March 4, 1913
[n 3]
Republican 31
(1908)
Secretary of War
(1904–1908)
James S. Sherman[n 4][n 5]
March 4, 1909October 30, 1912
Vacant[n 6]
October 30, 1912March 4, 1913
28 Woodrow Wilson
(1856–1924)
[89][90][91]
March 4, 1913 March 4, 1921 Democratic 32
(1912)
Governor of New Jersey
(1911–1913)
Thomas R. Marshall
33
(1916)
29 Warren G. Harding
(1865–1923)
[92][93][94]
March 4, 1921 August 2, 1923
[n 5][n 4]
Republican 34
(1920)
U.S. Senator from Ohio
(1915–1921)
Calvin Coolidge
30 Calvin Coolidge
(1872–1933)
[95][96][97]
August 2, 1923 March 4, 1929 Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
August 2, 1923March 4, 1925
35
(1924)
Charles G. Dawes
March 4, 1925March 4, 1929
31 Herbert Hoover
(1874–1964)
[98][99][100]
March 4, 1929 March 4, 1933
[n 3]
Republican 36
(1928)
Secretary of Commerce
(1921–1928)
Charles Curtis
32 Franklin D. Roosevelt
(1882–1945)
[101][102][103]
March 4, 1933 April 12, 1945
[n 5][n 4]
Democratic 37
(1932)
[n 14]
Governor of New York
(1929–1932)
John Nance Garner
March 4, 1933January 20, 1941
38
(1936)
39
(1940)
Henry A. Wallace
January 20, 1941January 20, 1945
40
(1944)
Harry S. Truman
January 20, 1945April 12, 1945
33 Harry S. Truman
(1884–1972)
[104][105][106]
April 12, 1945 January 20, 1953 Democratic Vice President Vacant[n 6]
April 12, 1945January 20, 1949
41
(1948)
Alben W. Barkley
January 20, 1949January 20, 1953
34 Dwight D. Eisenhower
(1890–1969)
[107][108][109]
January 20, 1953 January 20, 1961
[n 15]
Republican 42
(1952)
Supreme Allied Commander Europe
(1949–1952)
Richard Nixon
43
(1956)
35 John F. Kennedy
(1917–1963)
[110][111][112]
January 20, 1961 November 22, 1963
[n 5][n 11]
Democratic 44
(1960)
U.S. Senatorfrom Massachusetts
(1953–1960)
Lyndon B. Johnson
36 Lyndon B. Johnson
(1908–1973)
[113][114]
November 22, 1963 January 20, 1969 Democratic Vice President Vacant[n 6]
November 22, 1963January 20, 1965
45
(1964)
Hubert Humphrey
January 20, 1965January 20, 1969
37 Richard Nixon
(1913–1994)
[115][116][117]
January 20, 1969 August 9, 1974
[n 7]
Republican 46
(1968)
Vice President
(1953–1961)
Spiro Agnew[n 7]
January 20, 1969October 10, 1973
47
(1972)
Vacant[n 6]
October 10, 1973December 6, 1973
Gerald Ford
December 6, 1973August 9, 1974
38 Gerald Ford
(1913–2006)
[118][119][120]
August 9, 1974 January 20, 1977
[n 16]
Republican Vice President Vacant[n 6]
August 9, 1974December 19, 1974
Nelson Rockefeller
December 19, 1974January 20, 1977
39 Jimmy Carter
(born 1924)
[121][122][123]
January 20, 1977 January 20, 1981
[n 3]
Democratic 48
(1976)
Governor of Georgia
(1971–1975)
Walter Mondale
40 Ronald Reagan
(1911–2004)
[124][125][126]
January 20, 1981 January 20, 1989 Republican 49
(1980)
Governor of California
(1967–1975)
George H. W. Bush
50
(1984)
41 George H. W. Bush
(born 1924)
[127][128][129]
January 20, 1989 January 20, 1993
[n 3]
Republican 51
(1988)
Vice President Dan Quayle
42 Bill Clinton
(born 1946)
[130][131][132]
January 20, 1993 January 20, 2001 Democratic 52
(1992)
Governor of Arkansas
(1979–1981, 1983–1992)
Al Gore
53
(1996)
43 George W. Bush
(born 1946)
[133][134][135]
January 20, 2001 January 20, 2009 Republican 54
(2000)
Governor of Texas
(1995–2000)
Dick Cheney
55
(2004)
44 Barack Obama
(born 1961)
[136][137][138]
January 20, 2009 Incumbent Democratic 56
(2008)
U.S. Senator from Illinois
(2005–2008)
Joe Biden
57
(2012)

Living former presidents

As of January 2015, there are four living former presidents:

President Term of office Date of birth
Jimmy Carter 1977–1981 October 1, 1924 (age 90)
George H. W. Bush 1989–1993 June 12, 1924 (age 90)
Bill Clinton 1993–2001 August 19, 1946 (age 68)
George W. Bush 2001–2009 July 6, 1946 (age 68)