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Roye Shooting Has Historical Illuminati Links

 By: Twilight Language

 

Today’s, August 25, 2015 attack on a family in France has weird links to the past treatment of the Illuminati.

A gunman has killed three members of the same family – including a baby – and a police officer, during a shooting at a travellers’ camp in northeastern France.

The suspect, who is a member of the traveller community in the town of Roye, killed a six-month-old baby, a woman and a man believed to be a grandfather during the attack at 4:30 p.m. local time, near an Intermarche supermarket, according to police and a Paris prosecutor. Another child was injured.

Police who responded to the scene were greeted with gunfire. The shooter (allegedly drunk) seriously injured one 44-year-old officer – who later died – and slightly wounded another.

A police source said that the incident is understood to be a “criminal matter,” and not linked to terrorism.

Intriguingly, the camp’s location (shown above) is directly tied to the history of the Illuminati.

Roye is a commune in the Somme department in Picardie in northern France. In 1634, religious refugees from Seville, Spain, known as the illuministes tried to establish themselves in France – in Roye. They claimed to be inspired by celestial messages. Pierre Guérin, curate of Saint-Georges de Roye, was converted and himself created many disciples, called “les Guérinistes.” The Catholic Church sought out and executed all of them, by 1635.

Illuministes: Yes, we are talking about the Illuminati. See also, here.
Today’s allegedly unrelated August 25th French shooting in Roye follows closely – in time and space – that of the Thalys, France, train attack of August 21st. Here is the Wikipedia summary of that event:

At approximately 17:45 (5:45 p.m.) on 21 August, on Thalys train 9364 traveling from Amsterdam to Paris, a 26-year-old Moroccan man, reportedly identified as Ayoub El-Kahzzani, was exiting the toilets on train car No. 12, reportedly as soon as the train passed the border into France. He was shirtless and visibly armed with a Kalashnikov rifle, for which he had nine magazines of ammunition.
A 28-year-old French banker, only known as “Damien A.”, was heading to the toilet as the armed gunman was exiting. Damien A. attempted to restrain or disarm the gunman but in the ensuing struggle lost his balance and fell to the floor. A French and American academic working at the Sorbonne, 51-year-old Mark Moogalian, then attempted to wrest the rifle from the gunman, who then drew an automatic Luger pistol and shot Moogalian through the back of the neck. According to Agnès Ogier, the director of Thalys, another bullet grazed the train’s conductor. The assailant also tried to shoot his rifle, but it jammed.
The gunman was then tackled and subdued by a group of three American friends, two of them off-duty members of the U.S. Armed Forces. They were identified as 23-year-old United States Air Force Airman First Class Spencer Stone of the 65th Air Base Wing; 23-year-old Sacramento State senior Anthony Sadler; and Alek Skarlatos, a 22-year-old Oregon Army National Guard Specialist on holiday after deployment in Afghanistan.Sadler told CNN that when the gunman opened fire, Skarlatos yelled “Get him!” after which “Spencer immediately gets up to charge the guy, followed by Alek, then myself.” In an interview with Sky News, Skarlatos added that they had been lucky that the attacker’s rifle had jammed.
Stone was reportedly the first one to attack the gunman and was slashed multiple times while trying to subdue him, sustaining injuries at the head and neck. Stone put him in the chokehold, holding on though the assailant was cutting him with a box cutter, nearly severing his thumb. Skarlatos seized the assailant’s rifle and beat him in the head with the muzzle of it until he was unconscious. A British passenger, 62-year-old businessman Chris Norman, and an unidentified Frenchman came to their aid to hold the gunman down. They used Norman’s T-shirt to tie his arms behind his back. They then helped Moogalian, who was losing a lot of blood through his gunshot wound. Stone initially tried to wrap his shirt around the wound, despite having an injured hand and cut eye. However, he realized it was not going to work and instead stuck two of his fingers down Moogalian’s wound, found the carotid artery, and pushed down, which stopped the bleeding.
A video made with a cellphone shows the alleged perpetrator immobile, lying hogtied on the floor of the train, and blood visible on the windows and seats.
As the attack took place, the train, which was carrying 554 passengers, was passing Oignies in the Pas-de-Calais department. It was rerouted to the station of nearby Arras. Moogalian was airlifted to the University Hospital in Lille, while Stone later underwent surgery on his injured hand.
Further details on that event, see here.

Illuminati

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the secret society. For the film, see Illuminata (film). For the Muslim esoteric school, see Illuminationism. For other uses, see Illuminati (disambiguation).

Adam Weishaupt (1748–1830), founder of the Bavarian Illuminati

The Illuminati (plural of Latin illuminatus, “enlightened”) is a name given to several groups, both real and fictitious. Historically, the name refers to the Bavarian Illuminati, an Enlightenment-era secret society founded on May 1, 1776. The society’s goals were to opposesuperstition, obscurantism, religious influence over public life and abuses of state power. “The order of the day,” they wrote in their general statutes, “is to put an end to the machinations of the purveyors of injustice, to control them without dominating them.”[1] The Illuminati—along with Freemasonry and other secret societies—were outlawed through Edict, by the Bavarian ruler, Charles Theodore, with the encouragement of the Roman Catholic Church, in 1784, 1785, 1787 and 1790.[2] In the several years following, the group was vilified by conservative and religious critics who claimed that they continued underground and were responsible for the French Revolution.

In subsequent use, “Illuminati” refers to various organisations which claim or are purported to have links to the original Bavarian Illuminati or similar secret societies, though these links are unsubstantiated. They are often alleged to conspire to control world affairs, bymasterminding events and planting agents in government and corporations, in order to gain political power and influence and to establish a New World Order. Central to some of the most widely known and elaborate conspiracy theories, the Illuminati have been depicted as lurking in the shadows and pulling the strings and levers of power in dozens of novels, movies, television shows, comics, video games and music videos.

History

The Owl of Minerva perched on a book was an emblem used by the Bavarian Illuminati in their “Minerval” degree.

Adam Weishaupt (1748-1830) was a professor of Canon Law and Practical philosophy at the University of Ingolstadt. He was the only non-clerical professor at an institution run by Jesuits, whose order had been dissolved in 1773. The Jesuits of Ingolstadt, however, still retained the purse strings and some power at the University, which they continued to regard as their own. Constant attempts were made to frustrate and discredit non-clerical staff, especially when course material contained anything they regarded as liberal or Protestant. Weishaupt became deeply anti-clerical, resolving to spread the ideals of the Enlightenment (Aufklärung) through some sort of secret society of like-minded individuals.[3]

Finding Freemasonry to be expensive, and not open to his ideas, he founded his own society which was to have a gradal system based on Freemasonry, but his own agenda.[3] On 1 May 1776 Weishaupt and four students formed the Bund der Perfektibilisten, or Covenant of Perfectibility, taking the Owl of Minerva as their symbol.[4] The members were to use aliases within the society. Weishaupt becameSpartacus. Law students Massenhausen, Bauhof, Merz and Sutor became respectively Ajax, Agathon, Tiberius and Erasmus Roterodamus. Weishaupt later expelled Sutor for indolence.[5][6]

Illuminati members took a vow of secrecy and pledged obedience to their superiors. Members were divided into three main classes, each with several degrees, and many Illuminati chapters drew membership from existing Masonic lodges. The goals of the Illuminati were to eliminate superstition, prejudice and the domination of government, philosophy and science by the Roman Catholic Church, to reduce oppressive state abuses of power.[7] Weishaupt’s original plan was for the Order to be named the “Perfectibilists”.[3] The group has also been called the Bavarian Illuminati and its ideology “Illuminism”.

Many influential intellectuals and progressive politicians counted themselves as members, including Ferdinand of Brunswick and the diplomat Xavier von Zwack, who was the Order’s second-in-command.[8] The Order had branches in most European countries and reportedly had around 2,000 members over a span of ten years.[7] It attracted literary men such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe andJohann Gottfried Herder and the reigning dukes of Gotha and Weimar.

Fundamental changes occurred in the wake of the acceptance of Adolph Freiherr Knigge into the order. Knigge was a young author and Freemason who was steeped in the Western mystery traditions from an early age. On his admission to the order, in 1780, he was charged with recruiting in five areas in the German states, and was soon in charge of hundreds of pupils. Asking for admission to the higher degrees of the order, to teach them to his recruits, he discovered that these degrees only existed in Weishaupt’s mind. He was obliged (with Weishaupt’s full authority) to write them himself. When Weishaupt attempted to retroactively edit Knigge’s work, the two men fell out. Knigge left the order in 1783, depriving Weishaupt of his best theoretician, recruiter, and apologist.[9]

In 1777, Karl Theodor became ruler of Bavaria. He was a proponent of Enlightened Despotism and his government banned all secret societies including the Illuminati. Internal rupture and panic over succession preceded the society’s downfall.[7] A government edict dated March 2, 1785 “seems to have been deathblow to the Illuminati in Bavaria”. Weishaupt had fled and documents and internal correspondence, seized in 1786 and 1787, were subsequently published by the government in 1787.[10] Von Zwack’s home was searched and much of the group’s literature was disclosed.[8]

Barruel and Robison

Between 1797 and 1798, Augustin Barruel‘s Memoirs Illustrating the History of Jacobinism and John Robison‘s Proofs of a Conspiracy publicised the theory that the Illuminati had survived and represented an ongoing international conspiracy. This included the claim that it was behind the French Revolution. Both books proved to be very popular, spurring reprints and paraphrases by others.[11] A prime example of this is Proofs of the Real Existence, and Dangerous Tendency, Of Illuminism by Reverend Seth Payson, published in 1802.[12] Some of the response to this was critical, for example Jean-Joseph Mounier’s On the Influence Attributed to Philosophers, Free-Masons, and to the Illuminati on the Revolution of France.[13][14]

The works of Robison and Barruel made their way to the United States, and across New England, Reverend Jedidiah Morse and others gave sermons against the Illuminati. Their sermons were printed and the matter was followed in newspapers. Concern died down in the first decade of the 1800s, although it revived from time to time in the Anti-Masonic movement of the 1820s and 30s.[3]

Modern Illuminati

Several recent and present-day fraternal organisations claim to be descended from the original Bavarian Illuminati and openly use the name “Illuminati”. Some of these groups use a variation on the name “The Illuminati Order” in the name of their own organisations,[15][16] while others, such as the Ordo Templi Orientis, have “Illuminati” as a level within their organisation’s hierarchy. However, there is no evidence that these present-day groups have amassed significant political power or influence, and rather than trying to remain secret, they promote unsubstantiated links to the Bavarian Illuminati as a means of attracting membership.[7]

Popular culture

Modern conspiracy theory

The Illuminati did not long survive their suppression in Bavaria, and their further mischief and plottings in the work of Barruel and Robison must be considered as the invention of the writers.[3] However, writers such as Mark Dice,[17] David Icke, Texe Marrs, Jüri Lina and Morgan Gricar have argued that the Bavarian Illuminati have survived, possibly to this day.

Many modern conspiracy theories propose that world events are being controlled and manipulated by a secret society calling itself the Illuminati.[18][19] Conspiracy theorists have claimed that many notable people were or are members of the Illuminati. Presidents of the United States are a common target for such claims.[20][21]

Other theorists contend that a variety of historical events were orchestrated by the Illuminati, from the Battle of Waterloo, the French Revolution and President John F. Kennedy’s assassination to an alleged communist plot to hasten the New World Order by infiltrating the Hollywood film industry.[22][23]

Some conspiracy theorists claim that the Illuminati observe Satanic rituals.[24][25]