Governor signs first California groundwater rules

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will no longer be the last Western state with a pump-as-you-please approach to groundwater.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation on Tuesday overhauling the state’s management of its groundwater supply, bringing it in line with other states that have long regulated their wells.

Groundwater makes up nearly 60 percent of California’s water use during dry years. But it is not monitored and managed the same way as water from reservoirs and rivers.

Supporters of the legislation say the worst drought in a generation inspired them to rethink the state’s hands-off approach to tapping wells, which has led to sinking land and billions of dollars in damage to aquifers, roads and canals.

“This is a big deal,” Brown said at the signing ceremony in his office. “It has been known about for decades that underground water has to be managed and regulated in some way.”

The package signed into law requires some local governments and water districts to begin managing their wells, and it authorizes state water agencies to intervene if necessary. It also allows for water metering and fines to monitor and enforce restrictions.

SB1168, SB1319 and AB1739 by Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento, and Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills, passed in the final days of the legislative session over objections from Republican lawmakers and Central Valley Democrats.

The opposition was driven by agricultural interests that are increasingly dependent on pumping from wells as reservoirs dry up and government water allocations plunge in the drought. They say the legislation was rushed and punishes well-managed agencies while infringing on property rights.

“While there is legitimate concern about the over-drafting of some groundwater basins, this massive expansion of state authority will not solve the problem,” said Assembly Minority Leader Connie Conway, R-Tulare.

Brown said in a signing message he would push for legislation next year to streamline resolutions in disputes over groundwater rights.

Unlike other states that treat groundwater as a shared resource, California property owners have been entitled to tap water beneath their land since the Gold Rush days.

Lawmakers supporting the groundwater overhaul say the existing system pits farmers against each other in a costly race to dig the deepest wells, resulting in depleted aquifers.

Brown cautioned that years of disagreements and arguments are ahead in regulating groundwater.

The new laws, which take effect in January, target areas where groundwater basins are being depleted faster than they are being replenished to be sustainable by 2040. It gives local land planners two years to create a groundwater sustainability agency, which in turn has up to five years to develop a plan for managing wells and pumping.

The state Water Resources Control Board would step in and develop plans for communities that fail to abide by these rules.

“It isn’t all about laws and bills,” Brown said. “It’s about actually implementing the laws we have on the books.”

the water police

 

detroit-waterThe globalists murdered Detroit through the various free trade agreements consisting of NAFTA, GATT, and CAFTA. And now, their Agenda 21 minions are coming for your water, your homes and your children. 

There are several parts to this story. First, there is the human interest story of corrupt city forces who are abusing people from a bankrupt city who are down on their luck and are reveling in the joy of bringing misery to the downtrodden. Second, we see CPS rearing their ugly faces as they are attempting to take advantage of a crisis situation by placing more children under their control. Third, we are witnessing the attempted installation of the “Building One America Plan” which will force all suburban residents into densely populated stack and pack cities through the regionalization of the control of water supplies. This article examines the dangers posed to American communities through an examination of these three areas related to water control and what it could potentially mean for all US citizens.

“We Are Coming for Your Homes”

As of a week ago, any Detroit resident who is more than 60 days late on the payment of their water bill will be eligible to have a property tax lien placed on their property which could result in the foreclosure and forfeiture of their home, declared the Detroit Water and Sewage Board (DWSB). The DWSB has created a financial incentive by making it more difficult for people to pay their bills. The financial motive to the DWSB is apparent.

The department is gearing up for an aggressive campaign to shut off service to 1,500-3,000 delinquent water accounts according to Darryl Latimer, DWBS’ deputy director. Latimer insists that “Usually folks will then come in and make some kind of arrangement,” and that not paying your water bill has long lasting consequences. How well does this “get tough” policy work when it comes to a city that graduates less than half of it students, in a city where homes can be bought for a $100 and the median price of a home in Detroit is only $9,000, the estimated REAL unemployment rate is approaching 40%, and the police station only stays open for public business eight hours per day? By the way, Detroit residents are now only allowed a one time “adjustment” in their payment obligations for their water bills. I wonder where Mr. Latimer thinks that money is going to come from with regard to the destitute of Detroit?

Are Detroit officials waiting to gobble up these $9,000 homes? It would seem so, because extra contractors have been hired to shut off the water, as I write these words.

As this plot unfolds, it strongly appears that Detroit city officials have been shown how they can make money through the rigid enforcement of their water collection policies and this opens the door for more nefarious Agenda 21 forces to gain a bigger foothold in Detroit.

Is CPS Waiting in the Wings to Profit From This Crisis?

In a disturbing development, The Detroit News is reporting that residents that cannot pay their water bills don’t necessarily have to move out according to Latimer. Latimer is now talking out of both sides of his mouth. On one hand a delinquent water user is told that they will lose their home if one cannot pay their water bill and simultaneously he is saying that  if you have kids, you don’t have to move, but you could lose your kids to CPS.

It is hard to not read these two contradictory statements and conclude that Latimer is telling parents, we only want your homes if you have no kids. But if you have kids and cannot pay your bill, we want your kids and you can keep your home.

Latimer is quite clear on this point as he made both statements, in the same article to the Detroit News. He warns that if there are children in these households with water that has been shut off, the Department of Social Services will arrive on the scene and will remove the children from their parents.

To some people, the move to remove children under these conditions would seem prudent. Most sheep will not smell a rat. However, this development should raise red flags for all of those researchers who have followed the CPS practices of abducting children and then having many of these children mysteriously disappear, while in the custody of CPS. In circumstances, such as these, the fate of children is not the only thing to be worried about. Just take a look at the fate of the late State Senator from Georgia, the late Nancy Schaefer who exposed these abuses.

Detroit Entities & Suburbs Are Struggling to Pay Their Bills

The Detroit area is broke and I am not only referring to the people that cannot pay their bills. The cities are broke as are the schools. Thus, this is a spreading problem that has not even begun to peak.

1. The Detroit Public Schools owed $12 million dollars in 2012.

2. The city of Highland Park has accrued $17.4 million in sewerage bills and $1.6 million in water bills

3. The city of Melvindale also has an overdue balance of nearly $1.1 million in water and sewerage bills.

All three entities and more (e.g. city of Redford, Dearborn, etc) risk going into receivership in the same manner as bankrupt Detroit and the debt often begins with their unpaid DWSB bill. This is ominous because so many communities across America are going through this same kind of scenario. As bad as this may be, the worst is yet to come.

The number of insolvent cities is growing by leaps and bounds. What steps will they take to remain a viable entity? How much abuse lies in our future over this issue?

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