Curling at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Curling

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Curling, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venue Gangneung Gymnasium
Dates 8–25 February
No. of events 3 (1 men, 1 women, 1 mixed)
Competitors 116 from 13 nations
← 2014
2022 →

The curling competition at the 2018 Winter Olympics was held between 8 and 25 February 2018 at the Gangneung Curling Centre.[1] This was the seventh time that curling is on the Olympic program. In each of the men’sand women’s competitions, ten nations competed. As decided in 2015, a third competition, mixed doubles curling, has graduated from a spectator sport to a full medal competition. Teams consisted of one woman and one man. There were eight participating countries in the mixed competition.[2]

Qualification[edit]

Qualification to the curling tournaments at the Winter Olympics was determined through two methods. Nations could qualify teams by earning qualification points from performances at the 2016 and 2017 World Curling Championships. Teams could also qualify through an Olympic qualification event which was held in December 2017. Seven nations qualified teams via World Championship qualification points, while two nations qualified through the qualification event. As host nation, South Korea qualified teams automatically, thus making a total of ten teams per gender in the curling tournaments. For the mixed doubles competition the top seven ranked teams earning qualification points from performances at the 2016 and 2017 World Mixed Doubles Curling Championship qualified along with hosts South Korea.[3]

Competition schedule[edit]

Curling competitions started the day before the Opening Ceremony and finish on the last day of the games, meaning the sport was the only one to have a competition every day of the games.[4] The following was the competition schedule for the curling competitions:

RR Round robin SF Semifinals B 3rd place play-off F Final
Date
Event
Thu 8 Fri 9 Sat 10 Sun 11 Mon 12 Tue 13 Wed 14 Thu 15 Fri 16 Sat 17 Sun 18 Mon 19 Tue 20 Wed 21 Thu 22 Fri 23 Sat 24 Sun 25
Men’s tournament RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR SF B F
Women’s tournament RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR SF B F
Mixed doubles RR RR RR RR SF B F

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Sweden (SWE) 1 1 0 2
2  Canada (CAN) 1 0 0 1
 United States (USA) 1 0 0 1
4  Switzerland (SUI) 0 1 1 2
5  South Korea (KOR) 0 1 0 1
6  Japan (JPN) 0 0 1 1
 Norway (NOR) 0 0 1 1
Total 3 3 3 9

Medal events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men
details
 United States (USA)
John Shuster
Tyler George
Matt Hamilton
John Landsteiner
Joe Polo
 Sweden (SWE)
Niklas Edin
Oskar Eriksson
Rasmus Wranå
Christoffer Sundgren
Henrik Leek
 Switzerland (SUI)
Benoît Schwarz
Claudio Pätz
Peter de Cruz
Valentin Tanner
Dominik Märki
Women
details
 Sweden (SWE)
Anna Hasselborg
Sara McManus
Agnes Knochenhauer
Sofia Mabergs
Jennie Wåhlin
 South Korea (KOR)
Kim Eun-jung
Kim Kyeong-ae
Kim Seon-yeong
Kim Yeong-mi
Kim Cho-hi
 Japan (JPN)
Satsuki Fujisawa
Chinami Yoshida
Yumi Suzuki
Yurika Yoshida
Mari Motohashi
Mixed doubles
details
 Canada (CAN)
Kaitlyn Lawes
John Morris
 Switzerland (SUI)
Jenny Perret
Martin Rios
 Norway (NOR)1
Kristin Skaslien
Magnus Nedregotten
Notes
  1. ^ The Olympic Athletes from Russia team originally won the mixed doubles bronze medal, but were disqualified after Alexander Krushelnitskiy tested positive for meldonium.[5]

Results summary[edit]

Men’s tournament[edit]

Round robin[edit]

Standings

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Teams to tiebreaker
Country

Skip W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 Sweden Niklas Edin 7 2 62 43 34 28 13 8 87%
 Canada Kevin Koe 6 3 56 46 36 34 14 8 87%
 United States John Shuster 5 4 67 63 37 39 4 6 80%
 Great Britain Kyle Smith 5 4 55 60 40 37 8 7 82%
 Switzerland Peter de Cruz 5 4 60 55 39 37 10 6 83%
 Norway Thomas Ulsrud 4 5 45 54 32 36 6 6 82%
 South Korea Kim Chang-min 4 5 54 59 40 41 7 8 82%
 Japan Yusuke Morozumi 4 5 48 56 33 35 13 5 81%
 Italy Joël Retornaz 3 6 50 56 37 38 15 7 81%
 Denmark Rasmus Stjerne 2 7 53 70 36 39 12 5 83%
Results
Team

Canada Denmark Great Britain Italy Japan Norway South Korea Sweden Switzerland United States Record
 Canada 8–3 6–4 5–3 8–4 7–4 7–6 2–5 6–8 7–9 6–3
 Denmark 3–8 6–7 6–4 4–6 8–10 9–8 5–9 7–9 5–9 2–7
 Great Britain 4–6 7–6 7–6 6–5 10–3 5–11 6–8 6–5 4–10 5–4
 Italy 3–5 4–6 6–7 5–6 6–4 6–8 3–7 7–4 10–9 3–6
 Japan 4–8 6–4 5–6 6–5 6–4 4-10 4–11 5–6 8–2 4–5
 Norway 4–7 10–8 3–10 4–6 4–6 7–5 7–2 5–7 8–5 4–5
 South Korea 6–7 8–9 11–5 8–6 10-4 5–7 2–7 8–7 7–11 4–5
 Sweden 5–2 9–5 8–6 7–3 11–4 2–7 7–2 3–10 10–4 7–2
 Switzerland 8–6 9–7 5–6 4–7 6–5 7–5 7–8 10–3 4–8 5–4
 United States 9–7 9–5 10–4 9–10 2–8 5–8 11–7 4–10 8–4 5–4

Playoffs[edit]

Semifinals Gold medal game
1  Sweden 9
4  Switzerland 3
1  Sweden 7
3  United States 10
2  Canada 3
3  United States 5 Bronze medal game
2  Canada 5
4  Switzerland 7

Women’s tournament[edit]

Round robin[edit]

Standings

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Teams to tiebreaker
Country

Skip W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 South Korea Kim Eun-jung 8 1 75 44 41 34 5 15 79%
 Sweden Anna Hasselborg 7 2 64 48 42 34 14 13 83%
 Great Britain Eve Muirhead 6 3 61 56 39 38 12 6 79%
 Japan Satsuki Fujisawa 5 4 59 55 38 36 10 13 75%
 China Wang Bingyu 4 5 57 65 35 38 12 5 78%
 Canada Rachel Homan 4 5 68 59 40 36 10 12 81%
 Switzerland Silvana Tirinzoni 4 5 60 55 34 37 12 7 78%
 United States Nina Roth 4 5 56 65 38 39 7 6 78%
 Olympic Athletes from Russia Victoria Moiseeva 2 7 45 76 34 40 8 6 76%
 Denmark Madeleine Dupont 1 8 50 72 32 41 10 6 73%
Results
Team

Canada China Denmark Great Britain Japan Olympic Athlete From Russia South Korea Sweden Switzerland United States Record
 Canada 5–7 8–9 5–6 8–3 9–8 6–8 6–7 10–8 11–3 4–5
 China 7–5 10–7 7–8 7–6 6–7 5–12 4–8 7–2 4–10 4–5
 Denmark 9–8 7–10 6–7 5–8 7–8 3–9 3–9 4–6 6–7 1–8
 Great Britain 6–5 8–7 7–6 8–6 10–3 4–7 6–8 8–7 4–7 6–3
 Japan 3–8 6–7 8–5 6–8 10–5 7–5 5–4 4–8 10–5 5–4
 Olympic Athletes from Russia 8–9 7–6 8–7 3–10 5–10 2–11 4–5 2–11 6–7 2–7
 South Korea 8–6 12–5 9–3 7–4 5–7 11–2 7–6 7–5 9–6 8–1
 Sweden 7–6 8–4 9–3 8–6 4–5 5–4 6–7 8–7 9–6 7–2
 Switzerland 8–10 2–7 6–4 7–8 8–4 11–2 5–7 7–8 6–5 4–5
 United States 3–11 10–4 7–6 7–4 5–10 7–6 6–9 6–9 5–6 4–5

Playoffs[edit]

Semifinals Gold medal game
1  South Korea 8
4  Japan 7
1  South Korea 3
2  Sweden 8
2  Sweden 10
3  Great Britain 5 Bronze medal game
3  Great Britain 3
4  Japan 5

Mixed doubles[edit]

Round robin[edit]

Standings

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Teams to tiebreaker
Country

Athletes W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 Canada Kaitlyn Lawes / John Morris 6 1 52 26 28 20 0 9 80%
 Switzerland Jenny Perret / Martin Rios 5 2 45 40 29 26 0 10 71%
 Olympic Athletes from Russia Anastasia Bryzgalova / Alexander Krushelnitskiy 4 3 36 44 26 27 1 7 67%
 China Wang Rui / Ba Dexin 4 3 47 42 27 27 1 6 72%
 Norway Kristin Skaslien / Magnus Nedregotten 4 3 39 43 26 25 1 8 74%
 South Korea Jang Hye-ji / Lee Ki-jeong 2 5 40 40 23 29 1 7 67%
 United States Rebecca Hamilton / Matt Hamilton 2 5 37 43 26 25 0 9 74%
 Finland Oona Kauste / Tomi Rantamäki 1 6 35 53 23 29 0 6 67%
Results
Team

Canada China Finland Norway Olympic Athlete From Russia South Korea Switzerland United States of America Record
 Canada 10–4 8–2 6–9 8–2 7–3 7–2 6–4 6–1
 China 4–10 10–5 9–3 5–6 8–7 5–7 6–4 4–3
 Finland 2–8 5–10 6–7 5–7 4–9 6–7 7–5 1–6
 Norway 9–6 3–9 7–6 3–4 8–3 6–5 3–10 4–3
 Olympic Athletes from Russia 2–8 6–5 7–5 4–3 6–5 8–9 3–9 4–3
 South Korea 3–7 7–8 9–4 3–8 5–6 4–6 9–1 2–5
 Switzerland 2–7 7–5 7–6 5–6 9–8 6–4 9–4 5–2
 United States 4–6 4–6 5–7 10–3 9–3 1–9 4–9 2–5

Playoffs[edit]

Semifinals Gold medal game
1  Canada 8
4  Norway 4
1  Canada 10
2  Switzerland 3
2  Switzerland 7
3  Olympic Athletes from Russia 5 Bronze medal game
3  Olympic Athletes from Russia (DSQ) L
4  Norway W

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 113 athletes from 13 nations (including the IOC’s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate (the numbers of athletes are shown in parentheses). Some curlers competed in both the 4-person and mixed doubles tournament, therefore the numbers included on this list are the total athletes sent by each NOC to the Olympics, not how many athletes they qualified.

References

Ski jumping at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ski jumping

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Ski Jumping, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venue Alpensia Ski Jumping Stadium
Dates 8–19 February
No. of events 4 (3 men, 1 women)
Competitors 100 from 21 nations
← 2014
2022 →

Ski jumping at the 2018 Winter Olympics was scheduled to take place between 8 and 19 February 2018. A total of four ski jumping events were held.[1]

Qualification[edit]

A maximum of 100 athletes (65 male and 35 female) were allowed to qualify for the ski jumping events. The quotas were allocated using the Olympic Quota Allocation List, which is calculated using the FIS World Cup standings and Continental Cup Standings from seasons 2016–17 and 2017–18 added together.[1]

Competition schedule[edit]

The following was the competition schedule for the four ski jumping events.[2]

All times are (UTC+9).

Date Time Event
8 February 21:30 Men’s individual normal hill qualification
10 February 21:35 Men’s individual normal hill
12 February 21:50 Women’s individual normal hill
16 February 21:30 Men’s individual large hill qualification
17 February 21:30 Men’s individual large hill
19 February 21:30 Men’s team large hill

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Norway (NOR) 2 1 2 5
2  Germany (GER) 1 3 0 4
3  Poland (POL) 1 0 1 2
4  Japan (JPN) 0 0 1 1
Total 4 4 4 12

Events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Normal hill individual[3]
details
Andreas Wellinger
 Germany
259.1 Johann André Forfang
 Norway
250.9 Robert Johansson
 Norway
249.7
Large hill individual[4]
details
Kamil Stoch
 Poland
285.7 Andreas Wellinger
 Germany
282.3 Robert Johansson
 Norway
275.3
Large hill team[5]
details
 Norway (NOR)
Daniel-André Tande
Andreas Stjernen
Johann André Forfang
Robert Johansson
1098.5  Germany (GER)
Karl Geiger
Stephan Leyhe
Richard Freitag
Andreas Wellinger
1075.7  Poland (POL)
Maciej Kot
Stefan Hula
Dawid Kubacki
Kamil Stoch
1072.4
Women’s[6]
details
Maren Lundby
 Norway
264.6 Katharina Althaus
 Germany
252.6 Sara Takanashi
 Japan
243.8

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 100 athletes from 21 nations (including the IOC’s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate. The number of athletes from each nation are shown in parentheses.[7]

References

Figure skating at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Figure Skating

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Figure Skating, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venue Gangneung Ice Arena
Dates 9–23 February
No. of events 5 (1 men, 1 women, 3 mixed)
Competitors 153 (76 men, 77 women) from 32 nations
← 2014
2022 →

Figure skating at the 2018 Winter Olympics was held at the Gangneung Ice Arena in GangneungSouth Korea. The five events were scheduled to take place between 9 and 23 February 2018.[1]

Qualification[edit]

A total of 148 quota spots were available to athletes to compete at the games. Each NOC could enter a maximum of 18 athletes, with a maximum of nine men or nine women. An additional six quota spots were made available for the team event. A further ten team trophy quotas (two in each discipline) were distributed to countries who qualified for the team event but not the discipline itself. This meant up to a maximum of 158 athletes could participate.[2]

Competition schedule[edit]

The following was the competition schedule for all five events.[3] Sessions that included the event finals are shown in bold.

All times are (UTC+9).

Date Time Event
9 February 10:00 Team event (men’s short)
Team event (pair short)
11 February 10:00 Team event (ice dance short)
Team event (ladies’ short)
Team event (pair free)
12 February 10:00 Team event (men’s free)
Team event (ladies’ free)
Team event (ice dance free)
14 February 10:00 Pair skating (short)
15 February 10:30 Pair skating (free)
16 February 10:00 Men’s singles (short)
17 February 10:00 Men’s singles (free)
19 February 10:00 Ice dance (short)
20 February 10:00 Ice dance (free)
21 February 10:00 Ladies’ singles (short)
23 February 10:00 Ladies’ singles (free)
25 February 9:30 Gala exhibition

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Canada (CAN) 2 0 2 4
2  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR) 1 2 0 3
3  Japan (JPN) 1 1 0 2
4  Germany (GER) 1 0 0 1
5  China (CHN) 0 1 0 1
 France (FRA) 0 1 0 1
7  United States (USA) 0 0 2 2
8  Spain (ESP) 0 0 1 1
Total 5 5 5 15

Events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men’s singles[4]
details
Yuzuru Hanyu
 Japan
317.85 Shoma Uno
 Japan
306.90 Javier Fernández
 Spain
305.24
Ladies’ singles[5]
details
Alina Zagitova
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
239.57 Evgenia Medvedeva
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
238.26 Kaetlyn Osmond
 Canada
231.02
Pair skating[6]
details
Aliona Savchenko / Bruno Massot
 Germany
235.90 Sui Wenjing / Han Cong
 China
235.47 Meagan Duhamel / Eric Radford
 Canada
230.15
Ice dance[7]
details
Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir
 Canada
206.07 WR Gabriella Papadakis / Guillaume Cizeron
 France
205.28 Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani
 United States
192.59
Team[8]
details
 Canada (CAN)
Patrick Chan
Kaetlyn Osmond*
Gabrielle Daleman**
Meagan Duhamel / Eric Radford
Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir
73  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR)
Mikhail Kolyada
Evgenia Medvedeva*
Alina Zagitova**
Evgenia Tarasova / Vladimir Morozov*
Natalia Zabiiako / Alexander Enbert**
Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev
66  United States (USA)
Nathan Chen*
Adam Rippon**
Bradie Tennell*
Mirai Nagasu**
Alexa Scimeca KnierimChris Knierim
Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani
62

* Skaters who only competed in the short program/dance.
** Skaters who only competed in the free program/dance.

Entries[edit]

Countries began announcing their entries in 2017. The International Skating Union published the complete list on 30 January 2018.

Country Men[9] Ladies[10] Pairs[11] Ice dance[12]
 Australia[13] Brendan Kerry Kailani Craine Ekaterina AlexandrovskayaHarley Windsor
 Austria[14] Miriam Ziegler / Severin Kiefer
 Belgium[15] Jorik Hendrickx Loena Hendrickx
 Brazil[16] Isadora Williams
 Canada[17] Patrick Chan
Keegan Messing
Larkyn Austman
Gabrielle Daleman
Kaetlyn Osmond
Megan Duhamel / Eric Radford
Kirsten Moore-Towers / Michael Marinaro
Julianne Séguin / Charlie Bilodeau
Piper Gilles / Paul Poirier
Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir
Kaitlyn Weaver / Andrew Poje
 China Jin Boyang[18]
Yan Han[19]
Li Xiangning[20] Peng Cheng / Jin Yang
Sui Wenjing / Han Cong[18]
Yu Xiaoyu / Zhang Hao
Wang Shiyue / Liu Xinyu[21]
 Czech Republic[22] Michal Březina Anna Dušková / Martin Bidař Cortney Mansour / Michal Češka
 Finland[23] Emmi Peltonen
 France[24][25] Chafik Besseghier Maé-Bérénice Méité Vanessa James / Morgan Ciprès Gabriella Papadakis / Guillaume Cizeron
Marie-Jade Lauriault / Romain Le Gac
 Georgia[26] Moris Kvitelashvili
 Germany[27] Paul Fentz Nicole Schott Annika Hocke / Ruben Blommaert
Aliona Savchenko / Bruno Massot
Kavita Lorenz / Joti Polizoakis
 Great Britain[28] Penny Coomes / Nicholas Buckland
 Hungary[29] Ivett Tóth
 Israel[30] Oleksii Bychenko
Daniel Samohin
Aimee Buchanan(team event only)[31] Paige Conners / Evgeni Krasnopolski Adel Tankova / Ronald Zilberberg
 Italy[32] Matteo Rizzo Carolina Kostner
Giada Russo
Nicole Della Monica / Matteo Guarise
Valentina Marchei / Ondrej Hotarek
Anna Cappellini / Luca Lanotte
Charlene Guignard / Marco Fabbri
 Japan[33] Yuzuru Hanyu
Keiji Tanaka
Shoma Uno
Satoko Miyahara
Kaori Sakamoto
Miu Suzaki / Ryuichi Kihara Kana Muramoto / Chris Reed
 Kazakhstan[34] Denis Ten Aiza Mambekova
Elizabet Tursynbayeva
 Latvia[35] Deniss Vasiļjevs Diāna Ņikitina
 Malaysia[36] Julian Yee
 North Korea[37] Ryom Tae-ok / Kim Ju-sik
 Olympic Athletes from Russia[38][39] Mikhail Kolyada
Dmitri Aliev
Alina Zagitova
Evgenia Medvedeva
Maria Sotskova
Kristina Astakhova / Alexei Rogonov
Evgenia Tarasova / Vladimir Morozov
Natalia Zabiiako / Alexander Enbert
Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev
Tiffany Zahorski / Jonathan Guerreiro
 Philippines[40] Michael Christian Martinez
 Poland[41] Natalia Kaliszek / Maksym Spodyriev
 Slovakia[42] Nicole Rajičová Lucie Myslivečková / Lukáš Csölley
 South Korea[43] Cha Jun-hwan Choi Da-bin
Kim Ha-nul
Kim Kyu-eun / Alex Kangchan Kam Yura Min / Alexander Gamelin
 Spain[44] Javier Fernández
Felipe Montoya
Sara Hurtado / Kirill Khaliavin
 Sweden[45] Anita Östlund
 Switzerland[46] Alexia Paganini
 Turkey[47] Alisa Agafonova / Alper Uçar
 Ukraine[48] Yaroslav Paniot Anna Khnychenkova Oleksandra Nazarova / Maksym Nikitin
 United States[49] Nathan Chen
Adam Rippon
Vincent Zhou
Karen Chen
Mirai Nagasu
Bradie Tennell
Alexa Scimeca Knierim / Chris Knierim Madison Chock / Evan Bates
Madison Hubbell / Zachary Donahue
Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani
 Uzbekistan Misha Ge[50]

Records and firsts[edit]

The following new ISU best scores were set during this competition.

Event Date Component Skater(s) Country Score Ref
Team event 11 February Short program Evgenia Medvedeva  Olympic Athletes from Russia 81.06 [55]
Pair skating 15 February Free skating Aliona Savchenko / Bruno Massot  Germany 159.31 [56]
Ice dance 19 February Short dance Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir  Canada 83.67 [57]
20 February Free dance Gabriella Papadakis / Guillaume Cizeron  France 123.35 [58]
20 February Combined total Gabriella Papadakis / Guillaume Cizeron  France 205.28 [59]
20 February Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir  Canada 206.07 [58]
Ladies’ singles 21 February Short program Evgenia Medvedeva  Olympic Athletes from Russia 81.61
21 February Alina Zagitova  Olympic Athletes from Russia 82.92

Participating nations[edit]

The following National Olympic Committees earned spots to compete. 153 athletes from 32 nations were expected to participate, with number of athletes in parentheses. Malaysia made their Olympic debuts in the sport.[60][61][62][63]

References

Freestyle skiing at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Freestyle skiing

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Freestyle Skiing Aerials, Pyeongchang 2018.svgFreestyle Skiing Halfpipe, Pyeongchang 2018.svgFreestyle Skiing Moguls, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Freestyle Skiing Ski Cross, Pyeongchang 2018.svgFreestyle Skiing Slopestyle, Pyeongchang 2018.svg

Clockwise from top left, the pictograms for Aerials, Halfpipe, Moguls, Slopestyle, and Ski Cross events
Venue Bogwang Phoenix Park
Dates 9–23 February
No. of events 10 (5 men, 5 women)
Competitors 270 from 27 nations
← 2014
2022 →

Freestyle skiing at the 2018 Winter Olympics was held at the Bogwang Phoenix Park in PyeongchangSouth Korea. The events were scheduled to take place between 9 and 23 February 2018. A total of ten freestyle skiing events were held.[1]

Qualification[edit]

A maximum of 282 quota spots were available to athletes at the games. A maximum of 30 athletes could be entered by a National Olympic Committee, with a maximum of 16 men or 16 women. Each event had a specific quota amount allocated to it.[2]

Competition schedule[edit]

The following was the competition schedule for all ten events.[3]

Sessions that included the event finals are shown in bold.

All times are (UTC+9).

Date Time Event
9 February 10:00 Women’s moguls
11:45 Men’s moguls
11 February 19:30 Women’s moguls
12 February 19:30 Men’s moguls
15 February 20:00 Women’s aerials
16 February 20:00 Women’s aerials
17 February 10:00 Women’s ski slopestyle
20:00 Men’s aerials
18 February 10:00 Men’s ski slopestyle
20:00 Men’s aerials
19 February 10:00 Women’s ski halfpipe
20 February 10:30 Women’s ski halfpipe
13:15 Men’s ski halfpipe
21 February 11:30 Men’s ski cross
22 February 10:00 Women’s ski cross
11:30 Men’s ski halfpipe
23 February 10:00 Women’s ski cross

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Canada (CAN) 4 2 1 7
2  Switzerland (SUI) 1 2 1 4
 United States (USA) 1 2 1 4
4  France (FRA) 1 1 0 2
5  Belarus (BLR) 1 0 0 1
 Norway (NOR) 1 0 0 1
 Ukraine (UKR) 1 0 0 1
8  China (CHN) 0 2 1 3
9  Australia (AUS) 0 1 0 1
10  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR) 0 0 2 2
11  Great Britain (GBR) 0 0 1 1
 Japan (JPN) 0 0 1 1
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) 0 0 1 1
 New Zealand (NZL) 0 0 1 1
Total 10 10 10 30

Men’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Aerials[4]
details
Oleksandr Abramenko
 Ukraine
128.51 Jia Zongyang
 China
128.05 Ilya Burov
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
122.17
Halfpipe[5]
details
David Wise
 United States
97.20 Alex Ferreira
 United States
96.40 Nico Porteous
 New Zealand
94.80
Moguls[6]
details
Mikaël Kingsbury
 Canada
86.63 Matt Graham
 Australia
82.57 Daichi Hara
 Japan
82.19
Ski cross[7]
details
Brady Leman
 Canada
Marc Bischofberger
 Switzerland
Sergey Ridzik
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
Slopestyle[8]
details
Øystein Bråten
 Norway
95.00 Nick Goepper
 United States
93.60 Alex Beaulieu-Marchand
 Canada
92.40

Women’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Aerials[9]
details
Hanna Huskova
 Belarus
96.14 Zhang Xin
 China
95.52 Kong Fanyu
 China
70.14
Halfpipe[10]
details
Cassie Sharpe
 Canada
95.80 Marie Martinod
 France
92.60 Brita Sigourney
 United States
91.60
Moguls[11]
details
Perrine Laffont
 France
78.65 Justine Dufour-Lapointe
 Canada
78.56 Yuliya Galysheva
 Kazakhstan
77.40
Ski cross[12]
details
Kelsey Serwa
 Canada
Brittany Phelan
 Canada
Fanny Smith
 Switzerland
Slopestyle[13]
details
Sarah Höfflin
 Switzerland
91.20 Mathilde Gremaud
 Switzerland
88.00 Isabel Atkin
 Great Britain
84.60

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 270 athletes from 27 nations (including the IOC‘s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate[14] (the numbers of athletes are shown in parentheses).

References

Biathlon at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Biathlon

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Biathlon, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venue Alpensia Biathlon Centre
Dates 9–23 February 2018
No. of events 11 (5 men, 5 women, 1 mixed)
Competitors 219 from 28 nations
← 2014
2022 →

Biathlon at the 2018 Winter Olympics was held at the Alpensia Biathlon CentreDaegwallyeong-myeonPyeongchang-gun, Gangwon-doSouth Korea. There were eleven events contested: men and women competed in each of sprint, pursuit, individual, mass start, and relay; there was also a mixed relay event.[1] The eleven events were scheduled to take place between 9 and 23 February 2018.[2]

Qualification[edit]

A total of 230 quota spots were available to athletes to compete at the games (115 men and 115 women). Countries were assigned quotas using a combination of the Nation Cup scores of their top three athletes in the individual, sprint, and relay competitions, during the 2016–17 Biathlon World Cup season. The final twelve quota spots were available the following season.[3]

Competition schedule[edit]

The following was the competition schedule for all eleven events.[4]

Notes
  • Women’s 15 km individual was postponed due to high winds from 14 February to 15 February.[5]

All times are (UTC+9).

Date Time Event
10 February 20:15 Women’s 7.5 km sprint
11 February 20:15 Men’s 10 km sprint
12 February 19:10 Women’s 10 km pursuit
21:00 Men’s 12.5 km pursuit
15 February 17:15 Women’s 15 km individual
20:20 Men’s 20 km individual
17 February 20:15 Women’s 12.5 km mass start
18 February 20:15 Men’s 15 km mass start
20 February 20:15 Mixed 2 x 6 km / 2 x 7.5 km relay
22 February 20:15 Women’s 4 x 6 km relay
23 February 20:15 Men’s 4 x 7.5 km relay

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Germany (GER) 3 1 3 7
2  France (FRA) 3 0 2 5
3  Sweden (SWE) 2 2 0 4
4  Norway (NOR) 1 3 2 6
5  Slovakia (SVK) 1 2 0 3
6  Belarus (BLR) 1 1 0 2
7  Czech Republic (CZE) 0 1 1 2
8  Slovenia (SLO) 0 1 0 1
9  Italy (ITA) 0 0 2 2
10  Austria (AUT) 0 0 1 1
Total 11 11 11 33

Men’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Individual[6]
details
Johannes Thingnes Bø
 Norway
48:03.8 Jakov Fak
 Slovenia
48:09.3 Dominik Landertinger
 Austria
48:18.0
Sprint[7]
details
Arnd Peiffer
 Germany
23:38.8 Michal Krčmář
 Czech Republic
23:43.2 Dominik Windisch
 Italy
23:46.5
Pursuit[8]
details
Martin Fourcade
 France
32:51.7 Sebastian Samuelsson
 Sweden
33:03.7 Benedikt Doll
 Germany
33:06.8
Mass start[9]
details
Martin Fourcade
 France
35:47.3 Simon Schempp
 Germany
35:47.3 Emil Hegle Svendsen
 Norway
35:58.5
Relay[10]
details
 Sweden (SWE)
Peppe Femling
Jesper Nelin
Sebastian Samuelsson
Fredrik Lindström
1:15:16.5  Norway (NOR)
Lars Helge Birkeland
Tarjei Bø
Johannes Thingnes Bø
Emil Hegle Svendsen
1:16:12.0  Germany (GER)
Erik Lesser
Benedikt Doll
Arnd Peiffer
Simon Schempp
1:17:23.6

Women’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Individual[11]
details
Hanna Öberg
 Sweden
41:07.2 Anastasiya Kuzmina
 Slovakia
41:31.9 Laura Dahlmeier
 Germany
41:48.4
Sprint[12]
details
Laura Dahlmeier
 Germany
21:06.2 Marte Olsbu
 Norway
21:30.4 Veronika Vítková
 Czech Republic
21:32.0
Pursuit[13]
details
Laura Dahlmeier
 Germany
30:35.3 Anastasiya Kuzmina
 Slovakia
31:04.7 Anaïs Bescond
 France
31:04.9
Mass start[14]
details
Anastasiya Kuzmina
 Slovakia
35:23.0 Darya Domracheva
 Belarus
35:41.8 Tiril Eckhoff
 Norway
35:50.7
Relay[15]
details
 Belarus (BLR)
Nadezhda Skardino
Iryna Kryuko
Dzinara Alimbekava
Darya Domracheva
1:12.03.4  Sweden (SWE)
Linn Persson
Mona Brorsson
Anna Magnusson
Hanna Öberg
1:12.14.1  France (FRA)
Anaïs Chevalier
Marie Dorin Habert
Justine Braisaz
Anaïs Bescond
1:12.21.0

Mixed event[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Relay[16]
details
 France (FRA)
Marie Dorin Habert
Anaïs Bescond
Simon Desthieux
Martin Fourcade
1:08.34.3  Norway (NOR)
Marte Olsbu
Tiril Eckhoff
Johannes Thingnes Bø
Emil Hegle Svendsen
1:08.55.2  Italy (ITA)
Lisa Vittozzi
Dorothea Wierer
Lukas Hofer
Dominik Windisch
1:09.01.2

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 219 athletes from 28 nations (including the IOC‘s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate[17] (the numbers of athletes are shown in parentheses).

References

Cross-country skiing at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cross-country skiing

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Cross-Country Skiing, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venue Alpensia Cross-Country Centre
Dates 10–25 February
No. of events 12 (6 men, 6 women)
Competitors 313 from 65 nations
← 2014
2022 →

Cross-country skiing at the 2018 Winter Olympics was held at the Alpensia Cross-Country Centre in PyeongchangSouth Korea.[1] The twelve events took place between 10 to 25 February 2018.

Qualification[edit]

A maximum of 310 quota spots were available to athletes to compete at the games. A maximum of 20 athletes could be entered by a National Olympic Committee, with a maximum of 12 men or 12 women. There were two qualification standards for the games: an A standard and a B standard.[2]

Competition schedule[edit]

The following was the competition schedule for all twelve events.[3]

All times are (UTC+9).

Date Time Event
10 February 16:15 Women’s skiathlon
11 February 15:15 Men’s skiathlon
13 February 17:30 Men’s & women’s individual sprint qualification classical
13 February 20:00 Men’s & women’s individual sprint finals classical
15 February 15:30 Women’s 10 km freestyle
16 February 15:00 Men’s 15 km freestyle
17 February 18:30 Women’s 4 x 5 km relay
18 February 15:15 Men’s 4 x 10 km relay
21 February 17:00 Women’s team sprint freestyle
21 February 19:00 Men’s team sprint freestyle
24 February 14:00 Men’s 50 km mass start classical
25 February 15:15 Women’s 30 km mass start classical

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Norway (NOR) 7 4 3 14
2  Sweden (SWE) 2 3 1 6
3  Finland (FIN) 1 1 2 4
4  Switzerland (SUI) 1 0 0 1
 United States (USA) 1 0 0 1
6  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR) 0 3 5 8
7  Italy (ITA) 0 1 0 1
8  France (FRA) 0 0 2 2
Total 12 12 13 37

Men’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
15 kilometre freestyle[4]
details
Dario Cologna
 Switzerland
33:43.9 Simen Hegstad Krüger
 Norway
34:02.2 Denis Spitsov
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
34:06.9
30 kilometre skiathlon[5]
details
Simen Hegstad Krüger
 Norway
1:16:20.0 Martin Johnsrud Sundby
 Norway
1:16:28.0 Hans Christer Holund
 Norway
1:16:29.9
50 kilometre classical[6]
details
Iivo Niskanen
 Finland
2:08:22.1 Aleksandr Bolshunov
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
2:08:40.8 Andrey Larkov
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
2:10:59.6
4 x 10 kilometre relay[7]
details
 Norway (NOR)
Didrik Tønseth
Martin Johnsrud Sundby
Simen Hegstad Krüger
Johannes Høsflot Klæbo
1:33:04.9  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR)
Andrey Larkov
Aleksandr Bolshunov
Aleksey Chervotkin
Denis Spitsov
1:33:14.3  France (FRA)
Jean-Marc Gaillard
Maurice Manificat
Clément Parisse
Adrien Backscheider
1:33:41.8
Sprint classical[8]
details
Johannes Høsflot Klæbo
 Norway
3:05.75 Federico Pellegrino
 Italy
3:07.09 Aleksandr Bolshunov
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
3:07.11
Team sprint freestyle[9]
details
 Norway (NOR)
Martin Johnsrud Sundby
Johannes Høsflot Klæbo
15:56.26  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR)
Denis Spitsov
Aleksandr Bolshunov
15:57.97  France (FRA)
Maurice Manificat
Richard Jouve
15:58.28

Women’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
10 kilometre freestyle[10]
details
Ragnhild Haga
 Norway
25:00.5 Charlotte Kalla
 Sweden
25:20.8 Marit Bjørgen
 Norway


Krista Pärmäkoski
 Finland

25:32.4
15 kilometre skiathlon[11]
details
Charlotte Kalla
 Sweden
40:44.9 Marit Bjørgen
 Norway
40:52.7 Krista Pärmäkoski
 Finland
40:55.0
30 kilometre classical[12]
details
Marit Bjørgen
 Norway
1:22:17.6 Krista Pärmäkoski
 Finland
1:24:07.1 Stina Nilsson
 Sweden
1:24:16.5
4 x 5 kilometre relay[13]
details
 Norway (NOR)
Ingvild Flugstad Østberg
Astrid Uhrenholdt Jacobsen
Ragnhild Haga
Marit Bjørgen
51:24.3  Sweden (SWE)
Anna Haag
Charlotte Kalla
Ebba Andersson
Stina Nilsson
51:26.3  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR)
Natalia Nepryaeva
Yulia Belorukova
Anastasia Sedova
Anna Nechaevskaya
52:07.6
Sprint classical[14]
details
Stina Nilsson
 Sweden
3:03.84 Maiken Caspersen Falla
 Norway
3:06.87 Yulia Belorukova
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
3:07.21
Team sprint freestyle[15]
details
 United States (USA)
Kikkan Randall
Jessica Diggins
15:56.47  Sweden (SWE)
Charlotte Kalla
Stina Nilsson
15:56.66  Norway (NOR)
Marit Bjørgen
Maiken Caspersen Falla
15:59.44

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 313 athletes from 65 nations (including the IOC‘s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate[16] (the numbers of athletes are shown in parentheses).

References

Ice hockey at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ice hockey

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Ice Hockey, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venues Gangneung Hockey Centre
Kwandong Hockey Centre
Dates 10–25 February 2018
No. of events 2 (1 men, 1 women)
Competitors 496 from 14 nations
← 2014
2022 →

The ice hockey competitions of the 2018 Winter Olympics were played at two venues within the Gangneung Coastal Cluster in GangneungSouth Korea. The Gangneung Hockey Centre, which seats 10,000, and the Kwandong Hockey Centre, which seats 6,000, were both originally scheduled to be completed in 2016 but appear to have been completed in early 2017.[1][2][3][4] Both venues contain Olympic-sized rinks (60 by 30 m (196.85 by 98.43 ft)).

Twelve teams competed in the men’s tournament, which was to be held from 14 to 25 February, while eight teams competed in the women’s tournament, from 10 to 22 February.[5] In a historic deal, the women’s tournament featured a combined Korean team with an expanded roster.[6]

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR) 1 0 0 1
 United States (USA) 1 0 0 1
3  Canada (CAN) 0 1 1 2
4  Germany (GER) 0 1 0 1
5  Finland (FIN) 0 0 1 1
Total 2 2 2 6

Events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men’s
details
 Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR)  Germany (GER)  Canada (CAN)
Women’s
details
 United States (USA)  Canada (CAN)  Finland (FIN)

Men’s tournament[edit]

The tournament featured 12 countries, eight qualifying through the IIHF World Ranking, 3 through subsequent qualifying tournaments, and the host South Korea men’s national ice hockey team.[7] The format were the same as 2010 and 2014; three groups of four competed in three games to determine seeding, each playing every other team in their group, followed by four rounds of elimination games. Each group winner received a bye into the second round, along with the highest ranked of the remaining teams. The remaining eight teams played an eliminating qualification game to advance to the quarter-final round. Each quarter-final winner advanced to the semi-finals with the winners playing for the gold medal and the losers playing for the bronze.[8]

Qualification[edit]

Qualification was determined by the IIHF World Ranking following the 2015 Men’s World Ice Hockey Championships.[8] The top eight teams in the World Ranking receive automatic berths into the Olympics, the host received an automatic berth, and the remaining teams competed to qualify for the remaining three spots. In April 2014 René Fasel indicated that the Koreans would need a ranking of 18th or better[9] but in September of the same year the policy was apparently changed to guarantee the host a position.[10]

On 3 April 2017, the National Hockey League announced that its players would not be made available for selection for the national teams in the 2018 Winter Olympics. While it was “open to hearing from any of the other parties who might have an interest in the issue”, the NHL “confirmed that it has no interest or intention of engaging in any discussion that might make Olympic participation more attractive to the Clubs” and that it would not schedule a break for the Olympics in the 2017–18 season; to compensate, the NHL scheduled its all-star game and league-wide bye week for January, a month before the Olympics.[11] The primary disagreement between the NHL, IIHF, and IOC appears to have been over who would pay to insure players.[12] The IOC agreed to insure the players for the 2014 Olympics at a cost of $14 million, but was unwilling to pay again.[11] IOC appeared concerned that if it continued to cover the costs of NHL players, other professional bodies would demand similar treatment.[13] NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman noted that the NHL does not directly profit from their presence in the Olympics and that the IOC’s ambush marketing rules make it difficult for the league to capitalize on its players’ participation, adding that, “in fact, we kind of disappear for two weeks because historically the IOC hasn’t even let us join in promoting our participation in the Olympics”.[12]

The American Hockey League—a minor professional league that has largely acted as a development league for the NHL, stated that it would allow its players to be loaned to national teams for the duration of the Olympics (although like the NHL, there will not be a break in the season for the Games). CBC Sports reported that AHL players under two-way contracts with NHL affiliates would still be prohibited from attending, but deputy commissioner Bill Daly denied the claim.[14][15] Two weeks later, Daly reversed that position and stated that AHL players on two-way contracts would indeed be prohibited from the Olympics.

Unlike NHL, vast majority of European leagues will accommodate an Olympic break, headlined by Russia-based KHL‘s 33-days break,[16] Sweden-based Swedish Hockey League‘s 14-days break,[17] Switzerland-based National League‘s 25-days break,[18] German-based Deutsche Eishockey Liga‘s 26-days break,[19] Czech Republic-based Extraliga‘s 18-days break and Slovakia-based Tipsport liga‘s 14-days break.[20] Conversely, Finland-based SM-liiga will not accommodate a break, but will allow its top players leave the clubs and participate in the Olympics.[21]

Women’s tournament[edit]

The women’s tournament will run from 10 to 22 February. Eight nations will compete. The format will be the same as 2014. The top 4 seeded teams play in group A and the next four in group B. The top two seeds from group A will receive a bye from the quarterfinal round. The bottom two group A teams will play the top two group B teams in the quarterfinal round. The winner of these two games will play the top two group A teams in the semifinal round. The winners of the semifinal round will play for the gold medal and the losers will play for the bronze.[8]

Qualification[edit]

Qualification was determined by the IIHF World Ranking following the 2016 IIHF Women’s World Championship. The top five teams in the World Ranking receive automatic berths into the Olympics. South Korea gained direct entry by being host and all other teams competed to qualify for the remaining two spots.[8]

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 496 athletes from 14 nations (including the IOC’s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate (the numbers of athletes are shown in parentheses). The IOC initially admitted 13 men’s or women’s teams to compete. Later, North Korean athletes were rostered to participate in the women’s tournament alongside South Korean athletes in a combined women’s Korean team. Men’s rosters can be made up of 25 players, while women’s rosters can consist of up to 23. The Czech, German, Norwegian, Slovakian, and Slovenian teams entered only the men’s competition, while the Japanese team alone entered only the women’s competition. All other teams played in both tournaments.

References[edit]