2018 Commonwealth Games

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
XXI Commonwealth Games
2018 Commonwealth Games.svg

Logo of 2018 Commonwealth Games
Host city Gold CoastQueensland
Country Australia
Motto Share the Dream
Nations participating 71 CommonwealthTeams
Athletes participating 4,426
Events 275 in 19 sports
Opening ceremony 4 April
Closing ceremony 15 April
Officially opened by Charles, Prince of Wales
Officially closed by Edward, Earl of Wessex
Athlete’s Oath Karen Murphy
Queen’s Baton Final Runner Sally Pearson
Main venue Carrara Stadium
Website GC2018.com
<  XX XXII  >

The 2018 Commonwealth Games, officially known as the XXI Commonwealth Games and commonly known as Gold Coast 2018, were an international multi-sport event for members of the Commonwealth that were held on the Gold CoastQueenslandAustralia, between 4 and 15 April 2018. It was the fifth time Australia had hosted the Commonwealth Games and the first time a major multi-sport event achieved gender equality by having an equal number of events for males and female atheletes.[1]

More than 4,400 athletes from 71 Commonwealth Games Associations took part including Gambia where were readmitted as a Commonwealth Games Federation member on 31 March 2018. With 275 sets of medals, the games featured 19 Commonwealth sports, including beach volleyballpara triathlon and women’s rugby sevens. These sporting events took place at 14 venues in the host city, two venues in Brisbane and one venue each in Cairns and Townsville.[2]

These were the first Commonwealth Games to take place under the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) presidency of Louise Martin, CBE.[3]The host city Gold Coast was announced at the CGF General Assembly in BasseterreSaint Kitts, on 11 November 2011.[4] Gold Coast became the seventh Oceanian city to host the Commonwealth Games. These were the eighth games to be held in Oceania and Southern Hemisphere.

The host nation Australia topped the medal table for the fourth time in the past five Commonwealth Games, winning the most golds (80) and most medals overall (198). England and India finished second and third respectively.[5]VanuatuCook IslandsSolomon IslandsBritish Virgin Islands and Dominicaeach won their first commonwealth games medals.

Host selection[edit]

Countdown clock at Surfers Paradise

On 22 August 2008, the Premier of QueenslandAnna Bligh, officially launched Gold Coast City’s bid to host the Commonwealth Games in 2018. On 7 April 2009, the ABCreported a land exchange deal between Gold Coast City and State of Queensland for Carrara Stadium. According to Mayor Ron Clarke, the land would aid a potential bid for the 2018 Commonwealth Games. The land exchanged would be used as the site of an aquatics centre. In the same article, Mayor Clarke raised the question of the Australian Federal Government’s commitment to a 2018 Commonwealth Games bid in light of the Government’s support for Australia’s 2018 FIFA World Cup Finals bid.[7]On 16 April 2009, Queensland Premier Anna Bligh told reporters that a successful Commonwealth Games bid by Gold Coast City could help the tourist strip win a role in hosting the World Cup.[8]

“Some of the infrastructure that would be built for the Commonwealth Games will be useful for Gold Coast City to get a World Cup game out of the soccer World Cup if we’re successful as a nation,” she said. However the decision on the venues for the 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cups were made eleven months prior to the bid decision for the 2018 Commonwealth Games, so the potential World Cup venues had already been chosen. On 3 June 2009, Gold Coast City was confirmed as Australia’s exclusive bidder vying for the 2018 Commonwealth Games.[9] “Should a bid proceed, Gold Coast City will have the exclusive Australian rights to bid as host city for 2018,” Bligh stated.

“Recently I met with the president and CEO of the Australian Commonwealth Games Association and we agreed to commission a full and comprehensive feasibility study into the potential for the 2018 Commonwealth Games,” she said. “Under the stewardship of Queensland Events new chair, Geoff Dixon, that study is now well advanced.” On 15 March 2010, it was announced that the Queensland Government will provide initial funding of A$11 million for the 2018 Commonwealth Games bid. The Premier of Queensland has indicated the Government’s support for the bid to the Australian Commonwealth Games Association.[10] On 31 March 2010, the Australian Commonwealth Games Association officially launched the bid to host the 2018 Commonwealth Games.[11] In October 2011, Gold Coast City Mayor Ron Clarke stated that the games would provide a strong legacy for the city after the games have ended.[12]

On 31 March 2010, a surprise bid was made for the 2018 Commonwealth Games by the Sri Lankan city of Hambantota. Hambantota was devastated by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, and is undergoing a major face lift. The first phase of the Port of Hambantota is nearing completion and it is funded by the government of China. The Mattala International Airport, which is the second international Airport of Sri Lanka is built close to Hambantota. A new Hambantota International Cricket Stadium had also been built, which had hosted matches in the 2011 Cricket World Cup.

On 10 November 2011, the Hambantota bidders claimed they had already secured enough votes to win the hosting rights.[13]However, on 11 November it was officially announced Gold Coast City had won the rights to host the games.[14][15]

2018 Commonwealth Games bidding results
City Country Votes
Gold Coast City Australia Australia 43
Hambantota Sri Lanka Sri Lanka 27

Administration[edit]

In February 2012, Mark Peters was appointed Chief Executive Officer of the Gold Coast City 2018 Commonwealth Games Corporation.[16] The Queensland Government Minister tasked with overseeing the Games was Kate Jones.[17]

Preparation[edit]

Venues[edit]

Concept image for Carrara Stadium and Carrara Sport and Leisure Centre

One of the key technical aspects of Gold Coast City’s successful bid was the fact that the city had 80 percent of the planned venues in place before the bidding deadline. The vast majority of venues were located within 20-minutes driving time of the Athletes Village in Parkwood and were broadly grouped into three areas; Central Gold Coast City, North Gold Coast City and South Gold Coast City. The only competitions held outside of Gold Coast City were track cycling and the preliminary rounds of Basketball which were held in Brisbane and Cairns or Townsvillerespectively, along with the shooting which was held in neighbouring Belmont.[18]

Athletes village[edit]

2018 Commonwealth Games Village

The 2018 Commonwealth Games Athletes Village provided accommodation and services to 6600 athletes and officials in 1252 permanent dwellings: 1170 one and two bedroom apartments and 82 three bedroom townhouses at Southport, Gold Coast.[19]

Queen’s baton relay[edit]

Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Baton

The Gold Coast 2018 Queen’s Baton Relay was launched on Commonwealth Day, 13 March 2017, on the historic forecourt at Buckingham Palace, signalling the official countdown to the start of the Games. Accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh and Prince Edward The Earl of Wessex, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II heralded the start of the relay by placing her ‘message to the Commonwealth and its athletes’ into the distinctive loop-design Queen’s Baton which then set off on its journey around the globe. It traveled for 388 days, spending time in every nation and territory of the Commonwealth. The Gold Coast 2018 Queen’s Baton Relay was the longest in Commonwealth Games history. Covering 230,000 km over 388 days, the baton made its way through the six Commonwealth regions of Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, Europe, Asia and Oceania.

The baton landed on Australian soil in December 2017 and then spent 100 days travelling through Australia, finishing its journey at the Opening Ceremony on 4 April 2018, where the message was removed from the Baton and read aloud by Charles, Prince of Wales.[20]

Transport[edit]

Gold Coast light rail extension at Helensvale

The Gold Coast light rail system, connected a number of the key games venues including the Gold Coast City Aquatic Centre, Broadwater Parklands and the Gold Coast Convention & Exhibition Centre with the major accommodation centres of Surfers Paradise and Broadbeach and the Athletes Village at Parklands. An extension to the system was announced in October 2015, connecting the then current terminus at Gold Coast University Hospital to the railway line to Brisbane at Helensvale. The extension opened in December 2017, in time for the games.[21]

Anti-doping[edit]

The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority conducted an anti-doping drive in the months prior to the games, covering around 2500 tests of Australian athletes, as well as 500 tests against international athletes. Three Australians failed drug tests in this process, along with around 20 international athletes, subject to appeal. The Commonwealth Games Federation conducted in-competition testing and, matching protocol at the Olympic Games, launched a sample storage initiative to allow for future testing of samples up to ten years later, should detection technology improve.[22]

Participating teams[edit]

There were 71 nations competing at 2018 Commonwealth Games.[23] Maldives were scheduled to participate, but in October 2016 they withdrew from the Commonwealth.[24] The Gambia returned to the Commonwealth Games after being readmitted as a Commonwealth Games Federation member on 31 March 2018.[25]

Nations expected to compete at the 2018 Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast

[hide]Participating Commonwealth Games Associations: country name (number of participants)

Number of athletes by team[edit]

Calendar[edit]

OC Opening ceremony Event competitions 1 Gold medal events CC Closing ceremony
April 4
Wed
5
Thu
6
Fri
7
Sat
8
Sun
9
Mon
10
Tue
11
Wed
12
Thu
13
Fri
14
Sat
15
Sun
Events
Ceremonies OC CC N/A
Aquatics Diving pictogram.svg Diving 3 2 3 2 10
Swimming pictogram.svgSwimming 7 9 8 8 9 9 50
Athletics pictogram.svg Athletics 5 6 8 7 10 9 9 4 58
Badminton pictogram.svg Badminton 1 5 6
Basketball pictogram.svg Basketball 1 1 2
Volleyball (beach) pictogram.svg Beach volleyball 2 2
Boxing pictogram.svg Boxing 16 16
Cycling
Cycling (mountain biking) pictogram.svgMountain biking 2 2
Cycling (road) pictogram.svg Road cycling 2 2 4
Cycling (track) pictogram.svg Track cycling 6 4 6 4 20
Gymnastics
Gymnastics (artistic) pictogram.svgArtistic 1 1 2 5 5 14
Gymnastics (rhythmic) pictogram.svgRhythmic 1 1 4 6
Field hockey pictogram.svg Hockey 2 2
Lawn bowls pictogram.svg Lawn bowls 2 2 1 2 3 10
Netball pictogram.svg Netball 1 1
Powerlifting pictogram (Paralympics).svg Powerlifting 4 4
Rugby union pictogram.svg Rugby sevens 2 2
Shooting pictogram.svg Shooting 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 19
Squash pictogram.svg Squash 2 1 2 5
Table tennis pictogram.svg Table tennis 1 1 1 4 2 9
Triathlon pictogram.svg Triathlon 2 3 5
Weightlifting pictogram.svg Weightlifting 3 3 3 3 4 16
Wrestling pictogram.svg Wrestling 4 4 4 12
Daily medal events 19 17 22 31 33 26 15 24 27 44 17 275
Cumulative total 19 36 58 89 122 148 163 187 214 258 275
April 4th
Wed
5th
Thu
6th
Fri
7th
Sat
8th
Sun
9th
Mon
10th
Tue
11th
Wed
12th
Thu
13th
Fri
14th
Sat
15th
Sun
Total events

Sports[edit]

The regulations stated that from the 26 approved sports administered by Commonwealth Governing Bodies, a minimum of ten core sports and maximum of seventeen sports must be included in any Commonwealth Games schedule. The approved sports included the 10 core sports: athleticsbadmintonboxinghockeylawn bowlsnetball (for women), rugby sevenssquashswimming and weightlifting. Integrated disabled competitions were also scheduled for the Games in nine sports: swimming, athletics, cycling, table tennis, powerlifting and lawn bowls. Along with these events for the first time EAD events in triathlon were held, with the medals added to the final tally for each nation. A record 38 para events were contested at these games.[26] On 8 March 2016, beach volleyball was announced as the 18th sport.[27]

The program was broadly similar to that of the 2014 Commonwealth Games, with the major changes being the dropping of judo, the reintroduction of basketball, the debut of women’s rugby sevens and beach volleyball.[28]

On 7 October 2016, it was announced seven new events for women were added to the sport program, meaning there are an equal number of events for men and women. This marks the first time in history that a major multi-sport event has equality in terms of events. In total 275 events in 18 sports are being contested.[29][30]

Numbers in parentheses indicate the number of medal events contested in each sport.

Opening ceremony[edit]

The opening ceremony was held at Carrara Stadium in the Gold Coast, Australia, between 20:00 and 22:40 AEST, on 4 April 2018. Tickets for the ceremony started at 100 Australian dollars with half price tickets available for children.[31] The Head of the Commonwealth, Queen Elizabeth II, was represented by her son, Charles, Prince of Wales.[32]

Parade of Nations[edit]

Following tradition, the host of the previous gamesScotland entered first, followed by the rest of the European countries competing.[33] Following this, all countries paraded in alphabetical order from their respective regions. After the European countries entered, countries from Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Caribbean, and lastly Oceania marched in. The host nation of Australia entered last. Each nation was preceded by a placard bearer carrying a sign with the country’s name.

Closing ceremony[edit]

The closing ceremony was held at Carrara Stadium and was produced by Jack Morton Worldwide at a cost of AU$30 million. Australian pop stars Guy SebastianSamantha JadeDami Im and The Veronicas were among the performers along with children’s entertainers, The Wiggles.[34]

Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, declared the Games closed and passed the Commonwealth Games flag to Birmingham, England which will host the 2022 Games.[35]

The organising committee decided to bring in the athletes before the start of the ceremony. This caused an uproar on social media as, contrary to public expectations, none of the athletes were shown entering the stadium during the ceremony. Broadcast rights holders Channel 7 complained on air about the decision and concluded that, “it hasn’t really lived up to expectations”. Many spectators and athletes left during the ceremony, resulting in a half-empty stadium for much of the event.[36] Following this, the ABC claimed that Channel 7 was briefed on the closing ceremony schedule,[37] a claim which Channel 7 later refuted.[38]

Medal table[edit]

Only the top ten successful nations are displayed here.

The ranking in this table is consistent with International Olympic Committee convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won (in this context, a “nation” is an entity represented by a Commonwealth Games Association). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals. If nations are still tied, equal ranking is given and they are listed alphabetically by their three-letter country code. Australia tops the medal table rank with 80 gold, second England with 45 gold and third India with 26 gold.

Key

*   Host nation (Australia)

2018 Commonwealth Games medal table
Rank CGA Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Australia (AUS)* 80 59 59 198
2  England (ENG) 45 45 46 136
3  India (IND) 26 20 20 66
4  Canada (CAN) 15 40 27 82
5  New Zealand (NZL) 15 16 15 46
6  South Africa (RSA) 13 11 13 37
7  Wales (WAL) 10 12 14 36
8  Scotland (SCO) 9 13 22 44
9  Nigeria (NGR) 9 9 6 24
10  Cyprus (CYP) 8 1 5 14
Total (43 CGAs) 275 276 289 840

Marketing[edit]

Borobi

Motto[edit]

The official motto for the 2018 Commonwealth Games was “Share the Dream”. It was chosen to highlight the dreams and experience at the games that were shared by participants of the games, ranging from athletes to volunteers and the host country Australia to the world including the Commonwealth nations.[39]

Emblem[edit]

The emblem of the 2018 Commonwealth Games was a silhouette of the skyline and landscape of Gold Coast, the host city of the games.[40]

Mascot[edit]

Borobi was named as the mascot of the 2018 Commonwealth Games in 2016. Borobi is a blue koala, with indigenous markings on its body. The term “borobi” means koala in the Yugambeh language, spoken by the indigenous Yugambeh peopleof the Gold Coast and surrounding areas.[41]

Medals[edit]

At a charity gala held on 4 November 2017, the medals for the games were officially unveiled. Australian Indigenous artist Delvene Cockatoo-Collins designed the medals, while they were produced by the Royal Australian Mint. The design of the medals was inspired by the coastline of Gold Coast along with Indigenous culture.[42] Furthermore, Cockatoo-Collins mentioned, “the medal design represents soft sand lines which shift with every tide and wave, also symbolic of athletic achievement, The continual change of tide represents the evolution in athletes who are making their mark, Records are made and special moments of elation are celebrated”. Approximately 1,500 medals were created to be distributed to the medallists and each measures approximately 63 millimetres in diameter. The medals weigh between 138 and 163 grams.[43]

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Curling at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Curling

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Curling, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venue Gangneung Gymnasium
Dates 8–25 February
No. of events 3 (1 men, 1 women, 1 mixed)
Competitors 116 from 13 nations
← 2014
2022 →

The curling competition at the 2018 Winter Olympics was held between 8 and 25 February 2018 at the Gangneung Curling Centre.[1] This was the seventh time that curling is on the Olympic program. In each of the men’sand women’s competitions, ten nations competed. As decided in 2015, a third competition, mixed doubles curling, has graduated from a spectator sport to a full medal competition. Teams consisted of one woman and one man. There were eight participating countries in the mixed competition.[2]

Qualification[edit]

Qualification to the curling tournaments at the Winter Olympics was determined through two methods. Nations could qualify teams by earning qualification points from performances at the 2016 and 2017 World Curling Championships. Teams could also qualify through an Olympic qualification event which was held in December 2017. Seven nations qualified teams via World Championship qualification points, while two nations qualified through the qualification event. As host nation, South Korea qualified teams automatically, thus making a total of ten teams per gender in the curling tournaments. For the mixed doubles competition the top seven ranked teams earning qualification points from performances at the 2016 and 2017 World Mixed Doubles Curling Championship qualified along with hosts South Korea.[3]

Competition schedule[edit]

Curling competitions started the day before the Opening Ceremony and finish on the last day of the games, meaning the sport was the only one to have a competition every day of the games.[4] The following was the competition schedule for the curling competitions:

RR Round robin SF Semifinals B 3rd place play-off F Final
Date
Event
Thu 8 Fri 9 Sat 10 Sun 11 Mon 12 Tue 13 Wed 14 Thu 15 Fri 16 Sat 17 Sun 18 Mon 19 Tue 20 Wed 21 Thu 22 Fri 23 Sat 24 Sun 25
Men’s tournament RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR SF B F
Women’s tournament RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR SF B F
Mixed doubles RR RR RR RR SF B F

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Sweden (SWE) 1 1 0 2
2  Canada (CAN) 1 0 0 1
 United States (USA) 1 0 0 1
4  Switzerland (SUI) 0 1 1 2
5  South Korea (KOR) 0 1 0 1
6  Japan (JPN) 0 0 1 1
 Norway (NOR) 0 0 1 1
Total 3 3 3 9

Medal events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men
details
 United States (USA)
John Shuster
Tyler George
Matt Hamilton
John Landsteiner
Joe Polo
 Sweden (SWE)
Niklas Edin
Oskar Eriksson
Rasmus Wranå
Christoffer Sundgren
Henrik Leek
 Switzerland (SUI)
Benoît Schwarz
Claudio Pätz
Peter de Cruz
Valentin Tanner
Dominik Märki
Women
details
 Sweden (SWE)
Anna Hasselborg
Sara McManus
Agnes Knochenhauer
Sofia Mabergs
Jennie Wåhlin
 South Korea (KOR)
Kim Eun-jung
Kim Kyeong-ae
Kim Seon-yeong
Kim Yeong-mi
Kim Cho-hi
 Japan (JPN)
Satsuki Fujisawa
Chinami Yoshida
Yumi Suzuki
Yurika Yoshida
Mari Motohashi
Mixed doubles
details
 Canada (CAN)
Kaitlyn Lawes
John Morris
 Switzerland (SUI)
Jenny Perret
Martin Rios
 Norway (NOR)1
Kristin Skaslien
Magnus Nedregotten
Notes
  1. ^ The Olympic Athletes from Russia team originally won the mixed doubles bronze medal, but were disqualified after Alexander Krushelnitskiy tested positive for meldonium.[5]

Results summary[edit]

Men’s tournament[edit]

Round robin[edit]

Standings

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Teams to tiebreaker
Country

Skip W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 Sweden Niklas Edin 7 2 62 43 34 28 13 8 87%
 Canada Kevin Koe 6 3 56 46 36 34 14 8 87%
 United States John Shuster 5 4 67 63 37 39 4 6 80%
 Great Britain Kyle Smith 5 4 55 60 40 37 8 7 82%
 Switzerland Peter de Cruz 5 4 60 55 39 37 10 6 83%
 Norway Thomas Ulsrud 4 5 45 54 32 36 6 6 82%
 South Korea Kim Chang-min 4 5 54 59 40 41 7 8 82%
 Japan Yusuke Morozumi 4 5 48 56 33 35 13 5 81%
 Italy Joël Retornaz 3 6 50 56 37 38 15 7 81%
 Denmark Rasmus Stjerne 2 7 53 70 36 39 12 5 83%
Results
Team

Canada Denmark Great Britain Italy Japan Norway South Korea Sweden Switzerland United States Record
 Canada 8–3 6–4 5–3 8–4 7–4 7–6 2–5 6–8 7–9 6–3
 Denmark 3–8 6–7 6–4 4–6 8–10 9–8 5–9 7–9 5–9 2–7
 Great Britain 4–6 7–6 7–6 6–5 10–3 5–11 6–8 6–5 4–10 5–4
 Italy 3–5 4–6 6–7 5–6 6–4 6–8 3–7 7–4 10–9 3–6
 Japan 4–8 6–4 5–6 6–5 6–4 4-10 4–11 5–6 8–2 4–5
 Norway 4–7 10–8 3–10 4–6 4–6 7–5 7–2 5–7 8–5 4–5
 South Korea 6–7 8–9 11–5 8–6 10-4 5–7 2–7 8–7 7–11 4–5
 Sweden 5–2 9–5 8–6 7–3 11–4 2–7 7–2 3–10 10–4 7–2
 Switzerland 8–6 9–7 5–6 4–7 6–5 7–5 7–8 10–3 4–8 5–4
 United States 9–7 9–5 10–4 9–10 2–8 5–8 11–7 4–10 8–4 5–4

Playoffs[edit]

Semifinals Gold medal game
1  Sweden 9
4  Switzerland 3
1  Sweden 7
3  United States 10
2  Canada 3
3  United States 5 Bronze medal game
2  Canada 5
4  Switzerland 7

Women’s tournament[edit]

Round robin[edit]

Standings

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Teams to tiebreaker
Country

Skip W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 South Korea Kim Eun-jung 8 1 75 44 41 34 5 15 79%
 Sweden Anna Hasselborg 7 2 64 48 42 34 14 13 83%
 Great Britain Eve Muirhead 6 3 61 56 39 38 12 6 79%
 Japan Satsuki Fujisawa 5 4 59 55 38 36 10 13 75%
 China Wang Bingyu 4 5 57 65 35 38 12 5 78%
 Canada Rachel Homan 4 5 68 59 40 36 10 12 81%
 Switzerland Silvana Tirinzoni 4 5 60 55 34 37 12 7 78%
 United States Nina Roth 4 5 56 65 38 39 7 6 78%
 Olympic Athletes from Russia Victoria Moiseeva 2 7 45 76 34 40 8 6 76%
 Denmark Madeleine Dupont 1 8 50 72 32 41 10 6 73%
Results
Team

Canada China Denmark Great Britain Japan Olympic Athlete From Russia South Korea Sweden Switzerland United States Record
 Canada 5–7 8–9 5–6 8–3 9–8 6–8 6–7 10–8 11–3 4–5
 China 7–5 10–7 7–8 7–6 6–7 5–12 4–8 7–2 4–10 4–5
 Denmark 9–8 7–10 6–7 5–8 7–8 3–9 3–9 4–6 6–7 1–8
 Great Britain 6–5 8–7 7–6 8–6 10–3 4–7 6–8 8–7 4–7 6–3
 Japan 3–8 6–7 8–5 6–8 10–5 7–5 5–4 4–8 10–5 5–4
 Olympic Athletes from Russia 8–9 7–6 8–7 3–10 5–10 2–11 4–5 2–11 6–7 2–7
 South Korea 8–6 12–5 9–3 7–4 5–7 11–2 7–6 7–5 9–6 8–1
 Sweden 7–6 8–4 9–3 8–6 4–5 5–4 6–7 8–7 9–6 7–2
 Switzerland 8–10 2–7 6–4 7–8 8–4 11–2 5–7 7–8 6–5 4–5
 United States 3–11 10–4 7–6 7–4 5–10 7–6 6–9 6–9 5–6 4–5

Playoffs[edit]

Semifinals Gold medal game
1  South Korea 8
4  Japan 7
1  South Korea 3
2  Sweden 8
2  Sweden 10
3  Great Britain 5 Bronze medal game
3  Great Britain 3
4  Japan 5

Mixed doubles[edit]

Round robin[edit]

Standings

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Teams to tiebreaker
Country

Athletes W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 Canada Kaitlyn Lawes / John Morris 6 1 52 26 28 20 0 9 80%
 Switzerland Jenny Perret / Martin Rios 5 2 45 40 29 26 0 10 71%
 Olympic Athletes from Russia Anastasia Bryzgalova / Alexander Krushelnitskiy 4 3 36 44 26 27 1 7 67%
 China Wang Rui / Ba Dexin 4 3 47 42 27 27 1 6 72%
 Norway Kristin Skaslien / Magnus Nedregotten 4 3 39 43 26 25 1 8 74%
 South Korea Jang Hye-ji / Lee Ki-jeong 2 5 40 40 23 29 1 7 67%
 United States Rebecca Hamilton / Matt Hamilton 2 5 37 43 26 25 0 9 74%
 Finland Oona Kauste / Tomi Rantamäki 1 6 35 53 23 29 0 6 67%
Results
Team

Canada China Finland Norway Olympic Athlete From Russia South Korea Switzerland United States of America Record
 Canada 10–4 8–2 6–9 8–2 7–3 7–2 6–4 6–1
 China 4–10 10–5 9–3 5–6 8–7 5–7 6–4 4–3
 Finland 2–8 5–10 6–7 5–7 4–9 6–7 7–5 1–6
 Norway 9–6 3–9 7–6 3–4 8–3 6–5 3–10 4–3
 Olympic Athletes from Russia 2–8 6–5 7–5 4–3 6–5 8–9 3–9 4–3
 South Korea 3–7 7–8 9–4 3–8 5–6 4–6 9–1 2–5
 Switzerland 2–7 7–5 7–6 5–6 9–8 6–4 9–4 5–2
 United States 4–6 4–6 5–7 10–3 9–3 1–9 4–9 2–5

Playoffs[edit]

Semifinals Gold medal game
1  Canada 8
4  Norway 4
1  Canada 10
2  Switzerland 3
2  Switzerland 7
3  Olympic Athletes from Russia 5 Bronze medal game
3  Olympic Athletes from Russia (DSQ) L
4  Norway W

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 113 athletes from 13 nations (including the IOC’s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate (the numbers of athletes are shown in parentheses). Some curlers competed in both the 4-person and mixed doubles tournament, therefore the numbers included on this list are the total athletes sent by each NOC to the Olympics, not how many athletes they qualified.

References

Ski jumping at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ski jumping

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Ski Jumping, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venue Alpensia Ski Jumping Stadium
Dates 8–19 February
No. of events 4 (3 men, 1 women)
Competitors 100 from 21 nations
← 2014
2022 →

Ski jumping at the 2018 Winter Olympics was scheduled to take place between 8 and 19 February 2018. A total of four ski jumping events were held.[1]

Qualification[edit]

A maximum of 100 athletes (65 male and 35 female) were allowed to qualify for the ski jumping events. The quotas were allocated using the Olympic Quota Allocation List, which is calculated using the FIS World Cup standings and Continental Cup Standings from seasons 2016–17 and 2017–18 added together.[1]

Competition schedule[edit]

The following was the competition schedule for the four ski jumping events.[2]

All times are (UTC+9).

Date Time Event
8 February 21:30 Men’s individual normal hill qualification
10 February 21:35 Men’s individual normal hill
12 February 21:50 Women’s individual normal hill
16 February 21:30 Men’s individual large hill qualification
17 February 21:30 Men’s individual large hill
19 February 21:30 Men’s team large hill

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Norway (NOR) 2 1 2 5
2  Germany (GER) 1 3 0 4
3  Poland (POL) 1 0 1 2
4  Japan (JPN) 0 0 1 1
Total 4 4 4 12

Events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Normal hill individual[3]
details
Andreas Wellinger
 Germany
259.1 Johann André Forfang
 Norway
250.9 Robert Johansson
 Norway
249.7
Large hill individual[4]
details
Kamil Stoch
 Poland
285.7 Andreas Wellinger
 Germany
282.3 Robert Johansson
 Norway
275.3
Large hill team[5]
details
 Norway (NOR)
Daniel-André Tande
Andreas Stjernen
Johann André Forfang
Robert Johansson
1098.5  Germany (GER)
Karl Geiger
Stephan Leyhe
Richard Freitag
Andreas Wellinger
1075.7  Poland (POL)
Maciej Kot
Stefan Hula
Dawid Kubacki
Kamil Stoch
1072.4
Women’s[6]
details
Maren Lundby
 Norway
264.6 Katharina Althaus
 Germany
252.6 Sara Takanashi
 Japan
243.8

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 100 athletes from 21 nations (including the IOC’s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate. The number of athletes from each nation are shown in parentheses.[7]

References

Figure skating at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Figure Skating

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Figure Skating, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venue Gangneung Ice Arena
Dates 9–23 February
No. of events 5 (1 men, 1 women, 3 mixed)
Competitors 153 (76 men, 77 women) from 32 nations
← 2014
2022 →

Figure skating at the 2018 Winter Olympics was held at the Gangneung Ice Arena in GangneungSouth Korea. The five events were scheduled to take place between 9 and 23 February 2018.[1]

Qualification[edit]

A total of 148 quota spots were available to athletes to compete at the games. Each NOC could enter a maximum of 18 athletes, with a maximum of nine men or nine women. An additional six quota spots were made available for the team event. A further ten team trophy quotas (two in each discipline) were distributed to countries who qualified for the team event but not the discipline itself. This meant up to a maximum of 158 athletes could participate.[2]

Competition schedule[edit]

The following was the competition schedule for all five events.[3] Sessions that included the event finals are shown in bold.

All times are (UTC+9).

Date Time Event
9 February 10:00 Team event (men’s short)
Team event (pair short)
11 February 10:00 Team event (ice dance short)
Team event (ladies’ short)
Team event (pair free)
12 February 10:00 Team event (men’s free)
Team event (ladies’ free)
Team event (ice dance free)
14 February 10:00 Pair skating (short)
15 February 10:30 Pair skating (free)
16 February 10:00 Men’s singles (short)
17 February 10:00 Men’s singles (free)
19 February 10:00 Ice dance (short)
20 February 10:00 Ice dance (free)
21 February 10:00 Ladies’ singles (short)
23 February 10:00 Ladies’ singles (free)
25 February 9:30 Gala exhibition

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Canada (CAN) 2 0 2 4
2  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR) 1 2 0 3
3  Japan (JPN) 1 1 0 2
4  Germany (GER) 1 0 0 1
5  China (CHN) 0 1 0 1
 France (FRA) 0 1 0 1
7  United States (USA) 0 0 2 2
8  Spain (ESP) 0 0 1 1
Total 5 5 5 15

Events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men’s singles[4]
details
Yuzuru Hanyu
 Japan
317.85 Shoma Uno
 Japan
306.90 Javier Fernández
 Spain
305.24
Ladies’ singles[5]
details
Alina Zagitova
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
239.57 Evgenia Medvedeva
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
238.26 Kaetlyn Osmond
 Canada
231.02
Pair skating[6]
details
Aliona Savchenko / Bruno Massot
 Germany
235.90 Sui Wenjing / Han Cong
 China
235.47 Meagan Duhamel / Eric Radford
 Canada
230.15
Ice dance[7]
details
Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir
 Canada
206.07 WR Gabriella Papadakis / Guillaume Cizeron
 France
205.28 Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani
 United States
192.59
Team[8]
details
 Canada (CAN)
Patrick Chan
Kaetlyn Osmond*
Gabrielle Daleman**
Meagan Duhamel / Eric Radford
Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir
73  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR)
Mikhail Kolyada
Evgenia Medvedeva*
Alina Zagitova**
Evgenia Tarasova / Vladimir Morozov*
Natalia Zabiiako / Alexander Enbert**
Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev
66  United States (USA)
Nathan Chen*
Adam Rippon**
Bradie Tennell*
Mirai Nagasu**
Alexa Scimeca KnierimChris Knierim
Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani
62

* Skaters who only competed in the short program/dance.
** Skaters who only competed in the free program/dance.

Entries[edit]

Countries began announcing their entries in 2017. The International Skating Union published the complete list on 30 January 2018.

Country Men[9] Ladies[10] Pairs[11] Ice dance[12]
 Australia[13] Brendan Kerry Kailani Craine Ekaterina AlexandrovskayaHarley Windsor
 Austria[14] Miriam Ziegler / Severin Kiefer
 Belgium[15] Jorik Hendrickx Loena Hendrickx
 Brazil[16] Isadora Williams
 Canada[17] Patrick Chan
Keegan Messing
Larkyn Austman
Gabrielle Daleman
Kaetlyn Osmond
Megan Duhamel / Eric Radford
Kirsten Moore-Towers / Michael Marinaro
Julianne Séguin / Charlie Bilodeau
Piper Gilles / Paul Poirier
Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir
Kaitlyn Weaver / Andrew Poje
 China Jin Boyang[18]
Yan Han[19]
Li Xiangning[20] Peng Cheng / Jin Yang
Sui Wenjing / Han Cong[18]
Yu Xiaoyu / Zhang Hao
Wang Shiyue / Liu Xinyu[21]
 Czech Republic[22] Michal Březina Anna Dušková / Martin Bidař Cortney Mansour / Michal Češka
 Finland[23] Emmi Peltonen
 France[24][25] Chafik Besseghier Maé-Bérénice Méité Vanessa James / Morgan Ciprès Gabriella Papadakis / Guillaume Cizeron
Marie-Jade Lauriault / Romain Le Gac
 Georgia[26] Moris Kvitelashvili
 Germany[27] Paul Fentz Nicole Schott Annika Hocke / Ruben Blommaert
Aliona Savchenko / Bruno Massot
Kavita Lorenz / Joti Polizoakis
 Great Britain[28] Penny Coomes / Nicholas Buckland
 Hungary[29] Ivett Tóth
 Israel[30] Oleksii Bychenko
Daniel Samohin
Aimee Buchanan(team event only)[31] Paige Conners / Evgeni Krasnopolski Adel Tankova / Ronald Zilberberg
 Italy[32] Matteo Rizzo Carolina Kostner
Giada Russo
Nicole Della Monica / Matteo Guarise
Valentina Marchei / Ondrej Hotarek
Anna Cappellini / Luca Lanotte
Charlene Guignard / Marco Fabbri
 Japan[33] Yuzuru Hanyu
Keiji Tanaka
Shoma Uno
Satoko Miyahara
Kaori Sakamoto
Miu Suzaki / Ryuichi Kihara Kana Muramoto / Chris Reed
 Kazakhstan[34] Denis Ten Aiza Mambekova
Elizabet Tursynbayeva
 Latvia[35] Deniss Vasiļjevs Diāna Ņikitina
 Malaysia[36] Julian Yee
 North Korea[37] Ryom Tae-ok / Kim Ju-sik
 Olympic Athletes from Russia[38][39] Mikhail Kolyada
Dmitri Aliev
Alina Zagitova
Evgenia Medvedeva
Maria Sotskova
Kristina Astakhova / Alexei Rogonov
Evgenia Tarasova / Vladimir Morozov
Natalia Zabiiako / Alexander Enbert
Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev
Tiffany Zahorski / Jonathan Guerreiro
 Philippines[40] Michael Christian Martinez
 Poland[41] Natalia Kaliszek / Maksym Spodyriev
 Slovakia[42] Nicole Rajičová Lucie Myslivečková / Lukáš Csölley
 South Korea[43] Cha Jun-hwan Choi Da-bin
Kim Ha-nul
Kim Kyu-eun / Alex Kangchan Kam Yura Min / Alexander Gamelin
 Spain[44] Javier Fernández
Felipe Montoya
Sara Hurtado / Kirill Khaliavin
 Sweden[45] Anita Östlund
 Switzerland[46] Alexia Paganini
 Turkey[47] Alisa Agafonova / Alper Uçar
 Ukraine[48] Yaroslav Paniot Anna Khnychenkova Oleksandra Nazarova / Maksym Nikitin
 United States[49] Nathan Chen
Adam Rippon
Vincent Zhou
Karen Chen
Mirai Nagasu
Bradie Tennell
Alexa Scimeca Knierim / Chris Knierim Madison Chock / Evan Bates
Madison Hubbell / Zachary Donahue
Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani
 Uzbekistan Misha Ge[50]

Records and firsts[edit]

The following new ISU best scores were set during this competition.

Event Date Component Skater(s) Country Score Ref
Team event 11 February Short program Evgenia Medvedeva  Olympic Athletes from Russia 81.06 [55]
Pair skating 15 February Free skating Aliona Savchenko / Bruno Massot  Germany 159.31 [56]
Ice dance 19 February Short dance Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir  Canada 83.67 [57]
20 February Free dance Gabriella Papadakis / Guillaume Cizeron  France 123.35 [58]
20 February Combined total Gabriella Papadakis / Guillaume Cizeron  France 205.28 [59]
20 February Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir  Canada 206.07 [58]
Ladies’ singles 21 February Short program Evgenia Medvedeva  Olympic Athletes from Russia 81.61
21 February Alina Zagitova  Olympic Athletes from Russia 82.92

Participating nations[edit]

The following National Olympic Committees earned spots to compete. 153 athletes from 32 nations were expected to participate, with number of athletes in parentheses. Malaysia made their Olympic debuts in the sport.[60][61][62][63]

References

Freestyle skiing at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Freestyle skiing

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Freestyle Skiing Aerials, Pyeongchang 2018.svgFreestyle Skiing Halfpipe, Pyeongchang 2018.svgFreestyle Skiing Moguls, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Freestyle Skiing Ski Cross, Pyeongchang 2018.svgFreestyle Skiing Slopestyle, Pyeongchang 2018.svg

Clockwise from top left, the pictograms for Aerials, Halfpipe, Moguls, Slopestyle, and Ski Cross events
Venue Bogwang Phoenix Park
Dates 9–23 February
No. of events 10 (5 men, 5 women)
Competitors 270 from 27 nations
← 2014
2022 →

Freestyle skiing at the 2018 Winter Olympics was held at the Bogwang Phoenix Park in PyeongchangSouth Korea. The events were scheduled to take place between 9 and 23 February 2018. A total of ten freestyle skiing events were held.[1]

Qualification[edit]

A maximum of 282 quota spots were available to athletes at the games. A maximum of 30 athletes could be entered by a National Olympic Committee, with a maximum of 16 men or 16 women. Each event had a specific quota amount allocated to it.[2]

Competition schedule[edit]

The following was the competition schedule for all ten events.[3]

Sessions that included the event finals are shown in bold.

All times are (UTC+9).

Date Time Event
9 February 10:00 Women’s moguls
11:45 Men’s moguls
11 February 19:30 Women’s moguls
12 February 19:30 Men’s moguls
15 February 20:00 Women’s aerials
16 February 20:00 Women’s aerials
17 February 10:00 Women’s ski slopestyle
20:00 Men’s aerials
18 February 10:00 Men’s ski slopestyle
20:00 Men’s aerials
19 February 10:00 Women’s ski halfpipe
20 February 10:30 Women’s ski halfpipe
13:15 Men’s ski halfpipe
21 February 11:30 Men’s ski cross
22 February 10:00 Women’s ski cross
11:30 Men’s ski halfpipe
23 February 10:00 Women’s ski cross

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Canada (CAN) 4 2 1 7
2  Switzerland (SUI) 1 2 1 4
 United States (USA) 1 2 1 4
4  France (FRA) 1 1 0 2
5  Belarus (BLR) 1 0 0 1
 Norway (NOR) 1 0 0 1
 Ukraine (UKR) 1 0 0 1
8  China (CHN) 0 2 1 3
9  Australia (AUS) 0 1 0 1
10  Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR) 0 0 2 2
11  Great Britain (GBR) 0 0 1 1
 Japan (JPN) 0 0 1 1
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) 0 0 1 1
 New Zealand (NZL) 0 0 1 1
Total 10 10 10 30

Men’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Aerials[4]
details
Oleksandr Abramenko
 Ukraine
128.51 Jia Zongyang
 China
128.05 Ilya Burov
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
122.17
Halfpipe[5]
details
David Wise
 United States
97.20 Alex Ferreira
 United States
96.40 Nico Porteous
 New Zealand
94.80
Moguls[6]
details
Mikaël Kingsbury
 Canada
86.63 Matt Graham
 Australia
82.57 Daichi Hara
 Japan
82.19
Ski cross[7]
details
Brady Leman
 Canada
Marc Bischofberger
 Switzerland
Sergey Ridzik
 Olympic Athletes from Russia
Slopestyle[8]
details
Øystein Bråten
 Norway
95.00 Nick Goepper
 United States
93.60 Alex Beaulieu-Marchand
 Canada
92.40

Women’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Aerials[9]
details
Hanna Huskova
 Belarus
96.14 Zhang Xin
 China
95.52 Kong Fanyu
 China
70.14
Halfpipe[10]
details
Cassie Sharpe
 Canada
95.80 Marie Martinod
 France
92.60 Brita Sigourney
 United States
91.60
Moguls[11]
details
Perrine Laffont
 France
78.65 Justine Dufour-Lapointe
 Canada
78.56 Yuliya Galysheva
 Kazakhstan
77.40
Ski cross[12]
details
Kelsey Serwa
 Canada
Brittany Phelan
 Canada
Fanny Smith
 Switzerland
Slopestyle[13]
details
Sarah Höfflin
 Switzerland
91.20 Mathilde Gremaud
 Switzerland
88.00 Isabel Atkin
 Great Britain
84.60

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 270 athletes from 27 nations (including the IOC‘s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate[14] (the numbers of athletes are shown in parentheses).

References

Biathlon at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Biathlon

at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Biathlon, Pyeongchang 2018.svg
Venue Alpensia Biathlon Centre
Dates 9–23 February 2018
No. of events 11 (5 men, 5 women, 1 mixed)
Competitors 219 from 28 nations
← 2014
2022 →

Biathlon at the 2018 Winter Olympics was held at the Alpensia Biathlon CentreDaegwallyeong-myeonPyeongchang-gun, Gangwon-doSouth Korea. There were eleven events contested: men and women competed in each of sprint, pursuit, individual, mass start, and relay; there was also a mixed relay event.[1] The eleven events were scheduled to take place between 9 and 23 February 2018.[2]

Qualification[edit]

A total of 230 quota spots were available to athletes to compete at the games (115 men and 115 women). Countries were assigned quotas using a combination of the Nation Cup scores of their top three athletes in the individual, sprint, and relay competitions, during the 2016–17 Biathlon World Cup season. The final twelve quota spots were available the following season.[3]

Competition schedule[edit]

The following was the competition schedule for all eleven events.[4]

Notes
  • Women’s 15 km individual was postponed due to high winds from 14 February to 15 February.[5]

All times are (UTC+9).

Date Time Event
10 February 20:15 Women’s 7.5 km sprint
11 February 20:15 Men’s 10 km sprint
12 February 19:10 Women’s 10 km pursuit
21:00 Men’s 12.5 km pursuit
15 February 17:15 Women’s 15 km individual
20:20 Men’s 20 km individual
17 February 20:15 Women’s 12.5 km mass start
18 February 20:15 Men’s 15 km mass start
20 February 20:15 Mixed 2 x 6 km / 2 x 7.5 km relay
22 February 20:15 Women’s 4 x 6 km relay
23 February 20:15 Men’s 4 x 7.5 km relay

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Germany (GER) 3 1 3 7
2  France (FRA) 3 0 2 5
3  Sweden (SWE) 2 2 0 4
4  Norway (NOR) 1 3 2 6
5  Slovakia (SVK) 1 2 0 3
6  Belarus (BLR) 1 1 0 2
7  Czech Republic (CZE) 0 1 1 2
8  Slovenia (SLO) 0 1 0 1
9  Italy (ITA) 0 0 2 2
10  Austria (AUT) 0 0 1 1
Total 11 11 11 33

Men’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Individual[6]
details
Johannes Thingnes Bø
 Norway
48:03.8 Jakov Fak
 Slovenia
48:09.3 Dominik Landertinger
 Austria
48:18.0
Sprint[7]
details
Arnd Peiffer
 Germany
23:38.8 Michal Krčmář
 Czech Republic
23:43.2 Dominik Windisch
 Italy
23:46.5
Pursuit[8]
details
Martin Fourcade
 France
32:51.7 Sebastian Samuelsson
 Sweden
33:03.7 Benedikt Doll
 Germany
33:06.8
Mass start[9]
details
Martin Fourcade
 France
35:47.3 Simon Schempp
 Germany
35:47.3 Emil Hegle Svendsen
 Norway
35:58.5
Relay[10]
details
 Sweden (SWE)
Peppe Femling
Jesper Nelin
Sebastian Samuelsson
Fredrik Lindström
1:15:16.5  Norway (NOR)
Lars Helge Birkeland
Tarjei Bø
Johannes Thingnes Bø
Emil Hegle Svendsen
1:16:12.0  Germany (GER)
Erik Lesser
Benedikt Doll
Arnd Peiffer
Simon Schempp
1:17:23.6

Women’s events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Individual[11]
details
Hanna Öberg
 Sweden
41:07.2 Anastasiya Kuzmina
 Slovakia
41:31.9 Laura Dahlmeier
 Germany
41:48.4
Sprint[12]
details
Laura Dahlmeier
 Germany
21:06.2 Marte Olsbu
 Norway
21:30.4 Veronika Vítková
 Czech Republic
21:32.0
Pursuit[13]
details
Laura Dahlmeier
 Germany
30:35.3 Anastasiya Kuzmina
 Slovakia
31:04.7 Anaïs Bescond
 France
31:04.9
Mass start[14]
details
Anastasiya Kuzmina
 Slovakia
35:23.0 Darya Domracheva
 Belarus
35:41.8 Tiril Eckhoff
 Norway
35:50.7
Relay[15]
details
 Belarus (BLR)
Nadezhda Skardino
Iryna Kryuko
Dzinara Alimbekava
Darya Domracheva
1:12.03.4  Sweden (SWE)
Linn Persson
Mona Brorsson
Anna Magnusson
Hanna Öberg
1:12.14.1  France (FRA)
Anaïs Chevalier
Marie Dorin Habert
Justine Braisaz
Anaïs Bescond
1:12.21.0

Mixed event[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Relay[16]
details
 France (FRA)
Marie Dorin Habert
Anaïs Bescond
Simon Desthieux
Martin Fourcade
1:08.34.3  Norway (NOR)
Marte Olsbu
Tiril Eckhoff
Johannes Thingnes Bø
Emil Hegle Svendsen
1:08.55.2  Italy (ITA)
Lisa Vittozzi
Dorothea Wierer
Lukas Hofer
Dominik Windisch
1:09.01.2

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 219 athletes from 28 nations (including the IOC‘s designation of Olympic Athletes from Russia) were scheduled to participate[17] (the numbers of athletes are shown in parentheses).

References